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Brand-New: Summit 54

The lines on the Summit 54 are both modern and classic.
The lines on the Summit 54 are both modern and classic. (Courtesy Summit Motoryachts/)

The Summit Motoryachts 54 was designed for life on the water. The vessel is an excellent choice for boaters who enjoy longer journeys and who “really use their boat.”

Stepping aboard the yacht, you will find a teak sole matched with a teak dining settee at the transom. A two-stool bar setup is forward and to port, while teak steps lead up to the flying bridge. A part of that bridge deck extends aft to lend shade to the entire area. A Fusion sound system floods the deck with tunes.

Another outdoor entertainment area on the main deck is the sun lounge on the foredeck. Twin sunpads are aft of a bench seat for three. A canopy shades most of this area making it both a great place for some privacy, or, if you’re feeling tired, for a nap. The forepeak is a teak-soled workspace for crew.

The cockpit has a teak sole and teak steps leading to the flybridge.
The cockpit has a teak sole and teak steps leading to the flybridge. (Courtesy Summit Motoryachts/)

Up top, on the flying bridge, there is another sun lounge all the way forward, with an adjacent bridge so you can wet your whistle while bronzing up. Aft of that are two helm chairs, slightly offset to starboard. The lines of sight up here are very good and this vantage point should be useful for docking. The after end of the flying bridge will most likely be used for tender stowage, as it has a hydraulic crane.

The Summit 54 has a top speed of 26 knots and cruises at 23 knots.
The Summit 54 has a top speed of 26 knots and cruises at 23 knots. (Courtesy Summit Motoryachts/)

The yacht interior is equally well designed. Walnut wood and horizontal lines reign supreme in the salon, where wraparound windows let in lots of natural light. Silestone countertops in the galley offer a stylish look. A breakfast nook to starboard is served by a collapsible teak table.

Down below there is a spacious amidships master, a forepeak VIP and a third cabin, for guests.

This yacht has twin 542 hp Cummins QSB6.7s that can get her up to a top hop of 26 knots and have her cruising for 330 nautical miles at 23 knots.

Twin helm chairs on the flying bridge means the captain won’t be lonely.
Twin helm chairs on the flying bridge means the captain won’t be lonely. (Courtesy Summit Motoryachts/)

All told, this is a versatile vessel that will keep her passengers comfortable and happy, while providing pleasing performance numbers and lots of onboard design details to love.

For more information, visit: summitmotoryachts.com

Burger 50 Cruiser

The Burger 50 Cruiser is constructed with marine-grade aluminum and has Volvo Penta IPS powerplants.
The Burger 50 Cruiser is constructed with marine-grade aluminum and has Volvo Penta IPS powerplants. (Courtesy Burger Boat Co./)

The Burger 50 Cruiser is a couple-sized yacht with classic lines and a slippery hull bottom.

Burger worked with Vripack—using the naval architect’s patented Slide Hull design planing hull form—to create the 50 Cruiser’s running surface. Powered with twin 600 hp Volvo Penta IPS800s, the yacht has a 26-knot cruise speed and a 31-knot top-end, according to the builder.

Interior design is by Luiz de Basto.
Interior design is by Luiz de Basto. (Courtesy Burger Boat Co./)

The builder also says the hull design has 14-percent less hydrodynamic resistance when compared to a standard planing hull form. The end result should be a more fuel-efficient yacht. The design carries the beam forward, increasing real estate belowdecks.

Combine the planing hull design with Volvo Penta Interceptors, the builder says the 50 Cruiser comes onto plane without measurable bowrise. The Interceptors automatically adjust for trim and list.

The forepeak VIP's queen berth can be split into singles.
The forepeak VIP's queen berth can be split into singles. (Courtesy Burger Boat Co./)

The helm, forward and to starboard on the main deck, has Volvo Penta’s glass-bridge system with two 17-inch displays, a joystick for close-quarters maneuvering and dynamic positioning system.

Abaft the helm is a galley with two-burner cooktop, refrigerator/freezer and microwave/convection oven and a dishwasher. Across from the galley is a U-shaped dinette for all-weather dining. There is also an L-shaped settee with table in the cockpit for al fresco meals.

Note how the extended hardtop helps protect the teak-clad cockpit.
Note how the extended hardtop helps protect the teak-clad cockpit. (Courtesy Burger Boat Co./)

Built with marine-grade aluminum, Burger offers a lifetime warranty on the 50 Cruiser’s hull structure and a five-year warranty against blisters.

This 50-footer has classic motoryacht lines with high bulwarks and a straight sheerline from the bow to end of the house. The raked front windshield, flowing hardtop, eyebrow-shaped side windows in the superstructure and sheerline drop where the house meets the cockpit, work together to create a sporty profile.

Light bathes the full-beam master stateroom in natural light.
Light bathes the full-beam master stateroom in natural light. (Courtesy Burger Boat Co./)

Accommodations for the 50 Cruiser includes two staterooms and two heads. The owner’s stateroom is amidships and full beam with a queen-size berth, en suite head and sitting area. The room is kept bright via hullside windows. The forepeak VIP stateroom, also en suite, can have a queen berth or be split into two singles, and like the master, benefits from hull side windows as well as hatch overhead.

The extensive use of glass ensures unobstructed ocean views from almost anywhere in the salon.
The extensive use of glass ensures unobstructed ocean views from almost anywhere in the salon. (Courtesy Burger Boat Co./)

Owners can personalize the interior with their choice of woods, finishes and fabrics. Some other notable features are teak soles for the exterior, 11 kW Kohler genset, ice maker, central vacuum system and washer/dryer, to name a few.

Fore more information, visit: burgerboat.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 49′8″
  • Maximum Beam: 15′2″
  • Draft: 4′3″
  • Fuel Capacity: 565 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 135 Gal.

Auction Dates Change for 3 Available Boats

This 86-foot, 2003 Hatteras was refitted in 2018. Original list price was $2,850,000. Bidding starts at $1 million.
This 86-foot, 2003 Hatteras was refitted in 2018. Original list price was $2,850,000. Bidding starts at $1 million. (Courtesy Boathouse Auctions/)

Connecticut-based Boathouse Auctions, in response to the evolving coronavirus crisis, has changed the dates of auctions for three boats that remain available.

Bidding will now take place from April 17-20 for an 86-foot Hatteras sportfisherman, an 87-foot West Bay enclosed bridge, and an 80-foot Sunseeker.

The Hatteras is a 2003 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She has a custom paint scheme on her hull and an original list price of $2,850,000. Bidding starts at $1 million.

This 2005 87 West Bay was originally listed at $2.4 million. Bidding opens at $1.3 million.
This 2005 87 West Bay was originally listed at $2.4 million. Bidding opens at $1.3 million. (Courtesy Boathouse Auctions/)

The West Bay is a 2005 build designed by Jack Sarin. Her name is Dream Weaver, and she’s listed as being in “meticulous condition.” She was originally listed at $2.4 million. Bidding opens at $1.3 million.

The Sunseeker is a 2011 build listed as having “low hours” and “light use” with berths for 10 guests in four staterooms. Her name is Morningstar, and her description includes new electronics, new engine displays, a new generator and more. She was originally listed at $2,399,000. Bidding opens at $1.1 million.

This 80-foot 2011 Sunseeker was originally listed at $2,399,000. Bidding opens at $1.1 million.
This 80-foot 2011 Sunseeker was originally listed at $2,399,000. Bidding opens at $1.1 million. (Courtesy Boathouse Auctions/)

What is the two-second rule? At Boathouse Auctions, when bids are placed within the final two minutes of an auction, the clock is automatically reset to two minutes—to deter last-second bidding and give each bidder another chance.

For more information. visit: boathouseauctions.com

Dual Purpose: Coastal Craft 33 Express

With optional twin 400 hp Mercury Verado outboards, the Coastal Craft 33 Express has a reported 45-knot top-end speed. Twin 350 hp Verados are standard. Top speed: 41 knots.
With optional twin 400 hp Mercury Verado outboards, the Coastal Craft 33 Express has a reported 45-knot top-end speed. Twin 350 hp Verados are standard. Top speed: 41 knots. (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)

Canadian builder Coastal Craft has launched the 33 Express, a design intended to allow the elements inside on nice cruising days while protecting the skipper and guests if the weather turns rough.

The sunroof can be opened or closed, as can double rear doors. With everything open, Coastal Craft says, the 33 Express feels much like a runabout with the handling of a yacht. With everything closed, the temperature-controlled salon becomes a haven from wind and rain.

Built in aluminum, the Coastal Craft 33 Express comes standard with twin 350-horsepower Mercury Verado outboards. According to the builder, they allow for a top speed of 41 knots and a cruising speed of 32 knots. With optional 400-horsepower Verados, the cruising speed is 35 knots and the top hop is 45 knots.

Features at the helm include a SeaStar hydraulic power steering wheel, outboard electronic engine controls, and an outboard digital gauge display with a contoured switching panel.

Fuel capacity is 330 gallons, and the vessel has a 330-nautical-mile range, according to the builder. A single stateroom and head are part of the design, for overnights on the hook while cruising.

The 33 Express' interior is high-gloss black walnut with teak soles.
The 33 Express' interior is high-gloss black walnut with teak soles. (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)The sunroof can be opened entirely or opened with a screen.
The sunroof can be opened entirely or opened with a screen. (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)Note the galley aft with two-burner cooktop and fridge/freezer.
Note the galley aft with two-burner cooktop and fridge/freezer. (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)Glass above and around the superstructure brings light into the main deck.
Glass above and around the superstructure brings light into the main deck. (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)

What kind of finishing is aboard the Coastal Craft 33 Express? The interior is black walnut with teak soles. The cockpit is built with UltraDeck.

For more information, visit: coastalcraft.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 41′
  • Maximum Beam: 11′
  • Draft: 2′
  • Fuel Capacity: 330 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 66 Gal.

Hello, Galeon 425 HTS

The Galeon Yachts 425 HTS is powered with twin 370 hp Volvo Penta IPS500 diesels. Top speed: 32 knots.
The Galeon Yachts 425 HTS is powered with twin 370 hp Volvo Penta IPS500 diesels. Top speed: 32 knots. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)

The Galeon Yachts 425 HTS is a two-stateroom, two-head express cruiser with admirable performance and clever flourishes.

The Galeon 425 HTS is an all-weather cruiser with a retractable hardtop and nearly 360 degrees of glass in the superstructure. Close up the hardtop's roof, salon door and window aft to keep the main deck dry and warm. Or cool. The yacht is standard with 32,000-Btu Dometic air conditioning. Open the sunroof, salon door and windows to create an open-boat feeling.

For entertaining, the cockpit layout has a sun pad over the transom garage for catching rays on the hook. A cockpit table with opposing settees is the place for an alfresco lunch. There is also a foredeck sun pad for a couple. The salon has an L-shaped settee and table to starboard, and just flip up the salon window aft to keep guests inside and outside within earshot.

The yacht's helm station is forward to starboard on the main deck and it has a double-wide, bolster-style seat, single-lever controls, joystick and Zipwake trim system control. A Raymarine electronics package with A127 chart plotter and fishfinder, 4 kW radar with radome, VHF with AIS and autopilot, is optional.

On the performance side, the 425 HTS is powered with twin 370 hp Volvo Penta IPS500 diesels and it has a 28-knot cruise speed and a 32-knot top hop, according to the builder.

For meal prep, the 425 HTS's galley is equipped with a two-burner cooktop, Corian countertops, Isotherm refrigerator/freezer and a microwave.

When it comes to weekend or longer cruises with the family or friends, the yacht has a two-stateroom, two-head layout, including a full-beam master stateroom amidships with a queen-size berth and en suite head. There is also a forepeak VIP with a queen-size berth and en suite head.

The master stateroom is full beam (12'10
The master stateroom is full beam (12'10") and and has a queen-size berth. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)The galley is down with a two-burner electric cooktop, microwave and refrigerator/freezer.
The galley is down with a two-burner electric cooktop, microwave and refrigerator/freezer. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)The main deck can be closed up for climate control.
The main deck can be closed up for climate control. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)Open the salon door and window aft to connect the inside and outside spaces.
Open the salon door and window aft to connect the inside and outside spaces. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)Note the one-piece windshield.
Note the one-piece windshield. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)The foredeck sun pad for two is optional.
The foredeck sun pad for two is optional. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/)

There are several wood options to personalize the 425 HTS, and they include dark walnut cabinetry in a matte finish or gloss walnut. Beach wood grey is also an option. The soles can be striped walnut, misty grey or marbled grey oak. Upholstery can be beige or white.

Some other options include Samsung LED Smart TVs, teak cockpit, carpet runners, cockpit refrigerator and Cablemaster, to name a few.

For more information, visit: galeonyachts.us

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 44′
  • Maximum Beam: 12′10″
  • Draft: 3′5″
  • Fuel Capacity: 251 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 119 Gal.
  • Power: 2/370 hp Volvo Penta IPS500 diesels

Zipwake Ups the Ante

Yachts the size of this Azimut 78 now have the option of installing Zipwake interceptors.
Yachts the size of this Azimut 78 now have the option of installing Zipwake interceptors. (Courtesy Imtra/)

It has been three years since Massachusetts-based Imtra took over the Zipwake line of interceptors, and during that time, the team has been thinking big. In 2017, the Series S that Zipwake offered was for boats from 20 to 50 feet length overall. Now, Imtra has unveiled Series E, which expands the pitch-and-roll-controlling technology to yachts as large as 100 feet.

“The major restriction is the amount of lift generation you can get out of a unit,” says Jamie Simmons, Imtra’s product manager for Zipwake. “The Series S has a millimeter stroke on it. You have the blade going straight up and down in the water column to generate lift. When it was down, that blade was only 30 millimeters from top to bottom. You can only generate so much lift with a blade that size.”

Previous versions of Imtra’s Zipwake interceptors would have been too small for this Hatteras GT65. Series E is plenty big.
Previous versions of Imtra’s Zipwake interceptors would have been too small for this Hatteras GT65. Series E is plenty big. (Courtesy Imtra/)

The new Series E, by contrast, has a 60 mm stroke.

“The blade that comes down goes farther than on the Series S,” he says. “It gives you more lift generation, and the units are larger on the transom. The construction is more heavy-duty. It’s a larger blade, bigger moving parts—it just has to be more robust.”

Imtra now makes three different sizes of Series E Zipwake interceptors for vessels that have propeller tunnels. “You can utilize that tunnel space,” says Jamie Simmons, Imtra’s product manager for Zipwake. “The interceptor will go right over the tunnel.”
Imtra now makes three different sizes of Series E Zipwake interceptors for vessels that have propeller tunnels. “You can utilize that tunnel space,” says Jamie Simmons, Imtra’s product manager for Zipwake. “The interceptor will go right over the tunnel.” (Courtesy Imtra/)

The Series E components are part of the expanding line of Zipwake products that Imtra now offers. The company has been adding components that fit with different types of underwater hull shapes, such as chines and prop tunnels. Series E includes three straight, three tunnel and two chine interceptors. The three tunnel models (R500, R600 and R800) have different radii for prop tunnels of different sizes, while straight and intermediate blades can address different engine configurations, such as multiple outboards. Switching from a straight to a rounded blade between outboards, for instance, reduces the cavitational zone.

Skippers who are particularly finicky about the way their hull rides through the water can use the control pad to manually adjust a boat’s pitch and roll, but Imtra’s Zipwake product manager says that the majority of yachtsmen set the system to auto, which lets it do all the adjusting on its own.
Skippers who are particularly finicky about the way their hull rides through the water can use the control pad to manually adjust a boat’s pitch and roll, but Imtra’s Zipwake product manager says that the majority of yachtsmen set the system to auto, which lets it do all the adjusting on its own. (Courtesy Imtra/)

“With the straight edge, that zone was much larger,” Simmons says. “When you round the blade off, it brings that zone in.”

Going forward, he adds, Imtra’s goal is to have a wide range of Zipwake options. “We’re trying to have a solution for most every boat,” he says. “There will always be odd situations, but up to about 100 feet now with the Series E, more than likely, we can come up with a solution.”

The Riviera 505 SUV is an ‘Alfresco Entertainer’

The Riviera 505 SUV is designed to be equally at home cruising with family as its is for water sports fun, spearfishing and more.
The Riviera 505 SUV is designed to be equally at home cruising with family as its is for water sports fun, spearfishing and more. (Courtesy Riviera/)

Riviera Yachts in Australia has added the 505 SUV to its five-model lineup in the SUV series, which starts with a 395 SUV and goes up to a 575 SUV.

The 505 SUV has a new hull from the keel up, along with raised mezzanine seating inspired by a similar feature aboard the Riviera 64 Sports Motor Yacht. The entertainment area is covered for rain and sun protection.

Another relaxation zone is at the foredeck, which has a pathway from port to starboard so nobody has to step over the sun pads.

Onboard standard equipment includes a stainless-steel Ultra Anchor along with 164 feet of chain; dual transom doors for access to the hydraulic swim platform; and a barbecue, wet bar and fridge/freezer in the nearly 110-square-foot cockpit.

Standard power is a pair of 600-horsepower Volvo Penta D8-IPS800s. Optional engines are 725-horsepower Volvo Penta D11-IPS950s.

On the main deck, the U-shaped galley is aft and to port, positioned to serve the mezzanine as well as the indoor dinette. An L-shaped lounge is adjacent to the galley and extends to the helm station, which is also to starboard. That station has twin pedestal seats, a guest lounge to port and a sliding sunroof overhead. There are joystick engine controls and twin 16-inch Volvo Penta Glass Bridge displays.

Overnight accommodations are for six guests in three staterooms with two heads. The master stateroom spans the yacht’s full beam.

The galley aft setup lets the chef easily serve guests in the salon, mezzanine and cockpit.
The galley aft setup lets the chef easily serve guests in the salon, mezzanine and cockpit. (Courtesy Riviera/)The foredeck lounge maximizes available al fresco real estate.
The foredeck lounge maximizes available al fresco real estate. (Courtesy Riviera/)The mezzanine seating arrangement, inspired by the Australian builder's 64 Sports Motor Yacht, creates outdoor dining in a protected environment.
The mezzanine seating arrangement, inspired by the Australian builder's 64 Sports Motor Yacht, creates outdoor dining in a protected environment. (Courtesy Riviera/)When you combine the 360 degrees of glass, the sunroof and sliding doors, the 505 SUV feels like an open boat.
When you combine the 360 degrees of glass, the sunroof and sliding doors, the 505 SUV feels like an open boat. (Courtesy Riviera/)The master stateroom view onboard the 505 SUV.
The master stateroom view onboard the 505 SUV. (Courtesy Riviera/)

“Boating enthusiasts are really going to love the new 505 SUV,” Riviera owner Rodney Longhurst stated in a press release. “She perfectly complements our growing SUV range and, coupled with IPS performance, economy and ease of use, offers so much for families looking to put fun and freedom back into their weekends.”

How many SUV yachts has Riviera launched? More than 120, according to the builder.

For more information, visit: rivieraaustralia.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length overall: 60′8”
  • Max. beam: 16’10”
  • Draft: 4’5”
  • Fuel capacity: 1,057 Gal.
  • Freshwater capacity: 198 Gal.

Stay Safe Out There

Helmsmen should view FarSounder’s Argos 350 forward-looking sonar as a tool in the safety-first toolbox.
Helmsmen should view FarSounder’s Argos 350 forward-looking sonar as a tool in the safety-first toolbox. (Tim Marshall/)

My first trip through deception pass unfurled at almost 40 knots and likely shaved off some years of my life. This aptly named pass separates the northern reaches of Washington state’s Whidbey Island from Fidalgo Island’s southern shores and is home to underwater rocks, strong currents and an often-piping wind. Fortunately, our skipper threaded the needle just so, but this didn’t stop me from silently wishing for a powerful forward-looking sonar that would buy him significantly better situational awareness and greater reaction time than our bow-mounted lookout (me) could afford.

Now, nine years later, FarSounder’s Argos 350 system stands ready to help yachtsmen thread all sorts of nautical needles (but still not at 40 knots).

The desire to peer beneath the waves ahead of one’s vessel is ancient and obvious, and it’s one that modern technology is enabling. Much like a regular sonar, forward-looking sonar transmits acoustic energy (pings) through the water, except the transducers face forward. Given the nature of sound propagation, these pings also reflect off the ocean’s bottom, giving users information about objects in the water column and about the upcoming seafloor.

FarSounder has long offered forward-looking-sonar products, but its Argos 350 system brings exploration-level sonar to the leisure-marine market. It gives owners of displacement and semidisplacement yachts from about 60 to 130 feet length overall greater situational awareness and collision-avoidance information. It works at a range of up to 1,150 feet and at speeds up to 18 knots in open waters.

The Argos 350 system (call for pricing) employs a transducer module, a power module, custom and Ethernet cabling, a processing computer, and FarSounder’s SonaSoft software. The gear delivers FLS imagery to the yacht’s Ethernet network, allowing it to be viewed on third-party-compatible displays. Additionally, FarSounder’s software-developer kit allows some third-party equipment, such as an autopilot, to leverage the information.

Like all FLS, the Argos 350 has range that’s limited by the laws of physics when it comes to bottom mapping, however, these limitations are fewer when it comes to detecting water-column dangers.

“Our systems see eight times the water depth in front of the vessel—and often more—for bottom mapping, but they can also see out to the system’s full range for detecting obstacles in the water column,” says Cheryl M. Zimmerman, FarSounder’s CEO. “It’s able to show the distance to the obstacle, but not its depth, until the yacht comes into the bottom-mapping range. Our system ensonifies the whole volume and then reflects these soundings back to the transducer module via thousands of beams, and [they are] then sent to the processing computer.”

To skirt range-limiting issues such as signal interference, shallow-water operation, surface effects and vessel motion, Argos systems’ hardware and software collect and process FLS data in three dimensions.

“Without 3D capability, FLS are unable to easily compensate for roll and pitch without large amounts of expensive hardware,” Zimmerman says. “Even then, 2D roll-and-pitch compensation is marginal at best. FarSounder’s technology is capable of compensating for roll and pitch entirely in software in conjunction with an advanced sensor. All Argos systems have fast refresh rates and deliver a wide field of view with every single ping, and each deal with multipath and water-depth challenges.”

FarSounder’s Argos 350 can be installed during a yacht’s construction process or during a refit. “The Argos 350 has been designed to fit into a
standard 10-inch-diameter sea chest via a hoist, in addition to the standard through-hull installation option,” says Cheryl M. Zimmerman, FarSounder’s CEO.
FarSounder’s Argos 350 can be installed during a yacht’s construction process or during a refit. “The Argos 350 has been designed to fit into a standard 10-inch-diameter sea chest via a hoist, in addition to the standard through-hull installation option,” says Cheryl M. Zimmerman, FarSounder’s CEO. (Courtesy Farsounder/)

Once installed, the Argos 350 system delivers a 90-degree field of view out to 1,150 feet and typically displays this information as a split screen, with one side showing the vessel and its FLS cone overlaid atop cartography. The other side depicts a large 3D rendering and a smaller 2D rendering of the same scene. Additionally, the system displays heading, GPS data, and course- and speed-over-ground information.

And should an Argos system detect a threat, it’s not reticent.

“There’s an audible and/or visual alarm system that is user-defined,” Zimmerman says, adding that users can set warning parameters such as maximum and minimum ranges and depths. “One important parameter involves setting the sensitivity of the system alarm, with the user determining how many pings should be detected before setting off the alarm, in order to minimize false alarms.”

The system uses color coding to draw a user’s attention to loud—or dense—objects. “We offer both color coding that’s matched to signal strength, which refers to how ‘loud’ an object is, as well as color coding that’s mapped to depth,” Zimmerman says. “A multicolor, uniform luminance gradient color map is used to indicate depth, while an orange-copper color map is used to indicate signal level. The operator can switch between signal strength and depth, depending on their needs.”

This setup gives navigators an at-a-glance way to differentiate between the seafloor and dangerous water-column targets and—for gunkholing or exploration—a way to determine if there’s enough water to safely proceed.

Conveniently, the setup also helps to determine where to throw hooks, both large and small. “For finding a good anchorage, you may want to look at the signal strength in order to determine the bottom composition,” Zimmerman says. Anglers can also leverage this information to identify fish habitats.

An Argos 350 system does have limitations. Given that the maximum range for full bottom mapping and FLS capabilities is 1,150 feet, or approximately one-fifth of a nautical mile, and given that the maximum safe navigable speed in open water is 18 knots, an Argos 350 system will provide up to 38 seconds of warning at 18 knots before a vessel strikes calamity.

Granted, 38 seconds isn’t much time to let a skipper react, but the cost-free solution to that problem involves throttle discretion.

“In areas of ice and other potential hazards, I would advise a [to] yacht slow down and operate in a cautious manner,” Zimmerman says. At 12 knots, a yacht would ply the same waters in 57 seconds, while cutting speed to 5 knots would deliver 2 minutes, 16 seconds of reaction time.

So, while a yet-to-be-invented Argos 350 system would have quelled my fears the first time I transited Deception Pass, our skipper still would have needed to exercise some throttle discretion to leverage the safety margin the system affords.

And that latter bit, of course, is a whole different story.

New Electronics

Underwater Luminosity
Underwater Luminosity (Courtesy OceanLED/)

OceanLED’s E7 (call for pricing) underwater light kicks out up to 11,000 lumens and comes in two color schemes: midnight blue/ultra-white or multicolor. E7 lights have a 90-degree top beam and 20-degree side beam, and are available with 10- to 50-degree angle options. Additional features include strobe-light mode, dynamic-audio mode, a rectangular beam pattern and multiple controller types. Check it out, at oceanled.com.

Integrated Glass
Integrated Glass (Courtesy Garmin/)

Garmin’s line of GPSMap Plus multifunction displays are available with 7-, 9- and 12-inch screens ($900 to $2,900) and have full navigational capabilities. They also have much deeper engine integration than standard MFDs thanks to J1939 connectivity. GPSMap Plus MFDs also deliver Garmin’s OneHelm compatibility, which brings control of third-party systems onto the MFD’s user-friendly interface. Check it out, at garmin.com.

Digital Translator
Digital Translator (Courtesy Yacht Devices/)

Navigating on a personal computer requires a gateway device so the PC can access a yacht’s NMEA 0183 and/or NMEA 2000 networks. Yacht Devices’ NMEA 2000 Ethernet Gateway ($190) gives third-party navigation and routing-software access to, for example, AIS data. It’s easily configured and updated via a built-in web server. Ethernet connectivity ensures compatibility with NMEA’s OneNet protocol. Check it out, at yachtd.com.

The Azimut Atlantis 45 Debuts

The Azimut Atlantis 45 is a family-size express cruiser with two staterooms standard. A third berth is available.
The Azimut Atlantis 45 is a family-size express cruiser with two staterooms standard. A third berth is available. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Azimut Yachts in Italy is celebrating the debut of the Atlantis 45, which, at a length overall just shy of 48 feet, is the largest model in the builder’s Atlantis series.

Neo Design worked with Azimut on the exteriors and interior, including the two staterooms. One has twin berths that convert to a double, in case two couples are cruising together. (A third berth can be added upon request.) Also for couples overnighting on the hook, the Atlantis 45 has two heads with separate showers.

Power is a pair of 440-horsepower Volvo Penta IPS600s, with a reported top speed of 33 knots. The yacht’s design has characteristics similar to those of the Azimut Atlantis 51, with the upper part of the stem rising vertically and stretching forward to boost dynamics.

Fuel capacity is 264 gallons, and the yacht carries 93 gallons of water. Aft, there’s a garage that can handle an 8-foot tender.

Twin 440 hp Volvo Penta IPS600 diesel give the 45 Atlantis a reported top speed of of 33 knots.
Twin 440 hp Volvo Penta IPS600 diesel give the 45 Atlantis a reported top speed of of 33 knots. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)Al fresco dining space is shaded by the 45 Atlantis' hardtop.
Al fresco dining space is shaded by the 45 Atlantis' hardtop. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)Retracting the hardtop lets guest at the portside bridge-deck lounge catch some rays.
Retracting the hardtop lets guest at the portside bridge-deck lounge catch some rays. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)A sun pad over the transom garage adds to fun-in-the-sun real estate.
A sun pad over the transom garage adds to fun-in-the-sun real estate. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)For rainy days, there is dining belowdecks too. Drop the table and add a filler for an extra berth.
For rainy days, there is dining belowdecks too. Drop the table and add a filler for an extra berth. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)The U-shaped dinette settee with a filler cushion creates a third berth.
The U-shaped dinette settee with a filler cushion creates a third berth. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)These berths slide together for couples.
These berths slide together for couples. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Does the Atlantis 45 replace the Atlantis 43 in the Azimut lineup? Yes it does. In the past four years, according to Azimut, more than 140 hulls of the 43 were delivered.

For more information, visit: azimutyachts.it

Quick Specs:

  • Length overall: 47′11”
  • Max. beam: 13’11”
  • Draft: 3’7”
  • Fuel capacity: 264 Gal.
  • Freshwater capacity: 93 Gal.
  • Power: 2/440 hp Volvo Penta IPS600 diesels

Garmin’s Marq Signature Set

The five Marq watches in the collection, each for a different activity, are the Driver, Aviator, Captain, Adventurer and Athlete.
The five Marq watches in the collection, each for a different activity, are the Driver, Aviator, Captain, Adventurer and Athlete. (Courtesy Garmin/)

About a year ago, in celebration of the company’s 30th anniversary, Garmin introduced its Marq series of watches. Marketed as “luxury modern tools,” each watch is made of titanium with built-in smart features for different activities. The Marq Captain, for instance, is for boaters, with a regatta-timer bezel, coastal charts, tack assist, port conditions, and current wind speed, temperature and tide information. It also has a unique Jacquard weave strap from the south of France for use in saltwater environments. The other four Marq models—Driver, Aviator, Adventurer and Athlete—are similarly equipped for racing, flying, exploring and sports performance.

Now, Garmin has put all five of the Marq watches together into the Signature Set. Only 100 of the numbered sets are available, each priced at $10,000. (Individually, each watch is priced at $1,500 to $2,500.)

A built-in altimeter, barometer and compass are among this watch’s features, along with ClimbPro.
A built-in altimeter, barometer and compass are among this watch’s features, along with ClimbPro. (Courtesy Garmin/)A recovery-time scale is on this watch’s bezel, allowing for a quick-glance performance snapshot.
A recovery-time scale is on this watch’s bezel, allowing for a quick-glance performance snapshot. (Courtesy Garmin/)Pre-loaded with 250 racetracks and a track timer, this watch is built for Auto Lap splits and live delta time.
Pre-loaded with 250 racetracks and a track timer, this watch is built for Auto Lap splits and live delta time. (Courtesy Garmin/)This watch shows pilots two time zones in addition to the current time and comes with aviation maps.
This watch shows pilots two time zones in addition to the current time and comes with aviation maps. (Courtesy Garmin/)This watch face displays wind speed, temperature and tide information. Coastal charts are inside.
This watch face displays wind speed, temperature and tide information. Coastal charts are inside. (Courtesy Garmin/)

“Those who wear Marq wear the exploits of countless pilots, sailors, adventurers and athletes who have trusted our products with their lives in the most challenging places on Earth,” Garmin president and CEO Cliff Pemble states in a letter of authenticity that comes with each set. “Simply stated, Marq is an indelible stamp of credibility.”

The Signature Set, which became available this past December, comes in a handmade solid-walnut box. Each watch has a sapphire-crystal lens for durability; an always-on, sunlight-readable display with GPS; and built-in music storage, Garmin Pay, wrist-based heart rate sensor and pulse oximeter, and more. Each of the watches is also compatible with Garmin’s QuickFit solution for swapping out straps, should any boater grow tired of the Jacquard weave with the Marq Captain.

The Grand Banks 54 Debuts

The yacht features the classic lines typical of Grand Banks builds.
The yacht features the classic lines typical of Grand Banks builds. (Courtesy Grand Banks/)

Grand Banks has long been known for sweetly lined boats with sure-running hulls. And some of their models have become immediately recognizable classics. Surely that is the aim with the new 54, which would have debuted at the Palm Beach International Boat Show.

The 54 comes in both skylounge and flybridge versions, depending on the climes in which owners prefer to use their vessel. Notably, two galley layouts are available, one up and one down, depending how much privacy the owner desires when preparing food and dining. Most of the interior is finished in golden, blended teak sourced from renewable sources.

The yacht can have a galley up, or down, as seen above.
The yacht can have a galley up, or down, as seen above. (Courtesy Grand Banks/)

The 54 has a warped semi-displacement shape that is modeled after the hulls seen on ocean-racing sailboats. The fine entry splits rough seas with ease, while soft curves at the midsection usher water away with little slapping of the hull. There is also only 8 degrees of deadrise at the transom. This hullform is remarkable for the size of the wake it leaves behind, which, even at high speeds, is quite small. And this hullform is very efficient too. At a respectable 25-knot cruise speed the Grand Banks 54 burns 57 gph.

Seating to both port and starboard in the salon keeps passengers comfortable.
Seating to both port and starboard in the salon keeps passengers comfortable. (Courtesy Grand Banks/)

A good place to enjoy that 25-knot cruise is at the bridge helm which features twin Stidd helm chairs, options for navigational equipment and excellent sightlines. Aft of the helm is wetbar, electric barbecue and seating for passengers. There is also a davit that can handle 1,000 pounds, and a 10-foot-long, outboard-powered tender that rests on a custom cradle.

The yacht features the classic lines typical of Grand Banks builds.
The yacht features the classic lines typical of Grand Banks builds. (Courtesy Grand Banks/)

When the Grand Banks 54 does make her actual debut, we expect that she will be just as seaworthy and well loved as many of Grand Banks’ other fine offerings.

For more information, visit: grandbanks.com

FLIR’s New Cameras

All M300 Series cameras are designed to play nicely with third-party multifunction displays.
All M300 Series cameras are designed to play nicely with third-party multifunction displays. (Courtesy FLIR/)

"Man overboard!”

The words still ring in my ears, irrespective of the fact that the MOB wasn’t among our crew that day on Washington state’s Puget Sound. Unfortunately, we were too far away to decipher the situation with our eyes, and by the time we had a pair of binoculars on deck, another crew had rescued the MOB.

While the situation ended happily, it’s easy to wonder what could have happened if this incident hadn’t unfurled near a crowded mark rounding or, worse, if no one had spotted the MOB at all.

Fortunately, today’s technology can help. FLIR Systems’ latest-generation M300 Series fixed-mount cameras employ better optics, advanced image processing, improved target tracking and more-sensitive thermal cores than previous models, giving users better situational awareness, increased confidence and a menu of video-output options.

Sharp-eyed readers will notice that the M300 Series cameras use similar-looking but larger gimbals than FLIR’s previous-generation cameras. The extra space affords bigger optical zooms. Jim McGowan, Raymarine’s ­Americas ­marketing ­manager, notes that M300 ­cameras ­represent a ground-up ­effort between FLIR and Raymarine (FLIR ­acquired ­Raymarine in 2010). M300 ­cameras use FLIR’s ­Boson ­thermal-imaging cores, which are a significant improvement from FLIR’s previous-generation Tau 2 cores.

M300 Series cameras are available in five configurations, all of which sport two-axis gyrostabilization, IPX6 protection ­ratings, and the ability to withstand 100-knot winds. The product lineup starts with the M300C ($6,500): a high-definition, long-range, daylight-only camera with 360-degree continuous pan and plus or minus 90-degree tilt movements. The M300C has a 30x optical zoom backed up by a 12x digital zoom (for a maximum combined optical/electronic zoom of 360x), variable fields of view, and a Sony-built visible-light camera core that delivers high-end resolution and low-light ­capabilities.

FLIR’s M332 ($8,500) swaps out the daylight-only camera for a Boson 320 core with 320-by-256 thermal-image resolution and a 24-by-18-degree FOV. The M332 has a fixed optical focus of 12 feet to infinity, a 4x digital zoom, and the ­ability to pan through 360 degrees and tilt through plus or minus 90 degrees.

The M364 ($14,200) has the same technical specifications as the M332, but its upgraded Boson 640 thermal-imaging core ­delivers 640-by-512 image ­resolution and an 8x digital zoom.

Yachtsmen ­seeking dual daylight- and thermal-imaging payloads should consider the M364C ($20,500), which pairs the M300C’s high-definition, visible-light camera with the M364’s Boson 640 thermal-imaging core. Additionally, the M364C has FLIR’s Color Thermal Vision and Multispectral Dynamic Imaging technologies. CTV blends imagery from the daylight camera with imagery from the thermal-imaging camera and overlays the hybrid imagery with colors for better identification.

“The M364C pulls imagery off of its ­visible-light camera, reduces this down to hues and applies it on top of thermal imagery in real time,” McGowan says. “You can see the color return of the [buoy] flash.”

Additionally, FLIR’s MSX technology embeds image details such as edges and outlines from the camera’s visible-light sensor onto its thermal imagery.

“If you see a sailboat through a thermal camera, it will be a triangle, but if you see it with MSX, you’ll see the edges of sails, the mast and rigging—details that otherwise would have been lost.”
“If you see a sailboat through a thermal camera, it will be a triangle, but if you see it with MSX, you’ll see the edges of sails, the mast and rigging—details that otherwise would have been lost.” (Courtesy FLIR/)

“It fools the eyes and brain and helps solidify the image,” McGowan says, adding that the MSX layer makes faint edges become crisp. “If you see a sailboat through a thermal camera, it will be a triangle, but if you see it with MSX, you’ll see the edges of sails, the mast and rigging—details that otherwise would have been lost.”

The M364C LR ($29,500) is the final camera in the M300 lineup and is identical to the M364C, except that it features an 18-by-13.5-degree FOV (hence it’s “long-range” moniker).

“That’s the only difference,” McGowan says, explaining that the M364C LR is better suited for ships, as its narrower FOV exaggerates vessel motion.

All M300 Series cameras are fitted with an attitude and heading reference system sensor, which works with the camera’s horizontal and vertical stabilizer motors to remove vessel motion from the camera’s displayed video feed.

“For situational awareness, wider FOVs are better,” he says, adding that the M364C is typically the better choice for vessels shy of superyacht status.

In addition to AHRS sensors, all M300 Series cameras allow users to track AIS or radar targets using FLIR’s slew-to-cue tracking. Users select any AIS or radar target, and the camera automatically aims its unblinking eye on the scene.

“In a MOB emergency, the camera can automatically track the situation if someone pushes the MFD’s MOB button,” McGowan says, adding that the camera pulls the vessel’s position information at the time of the MOB incident from the multifunction display. “The camera remains [fixed on the target] while the boat moves under it.”

Thermal-image-enabled M300 ­cameras also have infrared-image-detection ­capabilities in their Boson cores, ­allowing the ­cameras to differentiate between water and nonwater objects in daylight or thermal scenes. And for anyone who cruises with Raymarine Axiom MFDs, the functionality also lets the cameras work with Raymarine’s ClearCruise augmented reality system.

M300 cameras also play nicely with Furuno, Garmin and Simrad displays. “Each manufacturer has access to [FLIR’s] software-developer kits and can build their own interfaces,” McGowan says, adding that users can control their cameras via their display’s touchscreen interface or add an ­optional FLIR-built joystick to their helm.

M300 cameras also provide user-friendly ­video-output options. “Our older cameras only had an analog-out signal, so they were ­restricted to ­standard-definition [video], and it was hard to see the camera’s feed in ­multiple places,” McGowan says. “In the new ­cameras, the analog-out signal is still there, but we’ve added a video-over-IP—or Ethernet streaming and ­high-definition [video].”

Users can simultaneously share the camera’s output with multiple screens by plugging it into the yacht’s Ethernet network or connecting directly to the camera’s server. Cooler still, if the boat has connectivity, users can stream M300 imagery ashore via browser-enabled devices.

M300 Series cameras deliver a menu’s worth of features, capabilities and signal-output options, while offering the kind of MOB-detection capabilities that can mean the difference between an unexpected swim and a tragedy.

New Electronics

Salty Sounds
Salty Sounds (Courtesy Fusion Entertainment/)

Fusion Entertainment’s MS-RS210 ­receiver ($350) is intended for use on flybridges, ­tenders or smaller boats, and comes with the company’s Digital Signal Processing technology. The MS-RS210 has an optically bonded 2.7-inch full-color LCD that shows album artwork and other metadata, and boaters can set up their DSP profiles to best match their yacht’s spaces and acoustic preferences. Check it out, at fusionentertainment.com.

Sea TV
Sea TV (Courtesy KVH/)

KVH’s TracVision UHD7 receive-only ­antennas deliver ultra-high-definition 4K programming from DirecTV and high ­definition from other satellite-TV ­providers, including Dish Network and Bell. The ­antennas ($13,995) use KVH’s TriAD ­technology, which lets them receive DirecTV programming, local channels and DVR ­support by simultaneously tracking three satellites. Check it out, at kvh.com.

Green Ducers
Green Ducers (Courtesy Oceanmax/)

Transducers provide an onscreen visual of everything below the keel, provided that the tech isn’t covered with growth. Propspeed’s Foulfree Transducer Coating ($40) is made to reduce growth on transducer surfaces without harming the marine ­environment. Rather than using biocides, Foulfree becomes slippery in water, so any marine growth washes away with just a few knots of boat speed. Check it out, at oceanmax.com.

Sirena Yachts Introduces 58 Coupé

Sirena Yachts says its new 58 Coupé has a top speed of 26 knots and has a range of approximately 850 nautical miles at 10 knots.
Sirena Yachts says its new 58 Coupé has a top speed of 26 knots and has a range of approximately 850 nautical miles at 10 knots. (Courtesy Sirena Yachts/)

The Sirena 58 Coupé is a model developed based on feedback from yacht owners.

The 58 Coupé has an open floor plan, stretching from the cockpit through the salon to the helm forward and to port. There are optional dual sliding sunroof panels that bring in extra light and fresh air into the salon. Nearly 360 degrees of glass in the superstructure provides ocean views in all directions and clean sightlines for the helmsman.

Designed by Germán Frers, the Sirena 58 Coupé has a semidisplacement hull form with a wave-slicing plumb-bow. She looks modern, rugged and ship-like with a seemingly low profile. Interior design is by Tommaso Spadolini.

Note the stairs to the left in the picture. This Sirena 58 Coupé has the bilevel suite with access to the foredeck lounge form the stateroom.
Note the stairs to the left in the picture. This Sirena 58 Coupé has the bilevel suite with access to the foredeck lounge form the stateroom. (Courtesy Sirena Yachts/)The 58 Coupé's galley aft arrangement creates more countertop space, including room for an under-cabinet refrigerators/freezers, than Sirena Yachts’ standard 58-footer.
The 58 Coupé's galley aft arrangement creates more countertop space, including room for an under-cabinet refrigerators/freezers, than Sirena Yachts’ standard 58-footer. (Courtesy Sirena Yachts/)

The galley is aft with a four-burner cooktop, microwave/convection oven and countertops for meal prep to starboard with refrigerator and freezer drawers across to port. Compared to the standard Sirena 58's layout, the Coupé's setup allows for more countertop space. For al fresco meals, the cockpit dining table is shaded by the hardtop's overhang and an electronically controlled sunshade.

There are three layout options belowdecks: The 58 Coupé's standard scenario comes with a forepeak VIP stateroom, two twin berths to port and a full-beam master stateroom amidships. There are also options for two master staterooms, and one layout that positions two twin berths alongside the original master stateroom. One of the most interesting options is the bi-level master suite, which has direct access to the foredeck lounge via a private stairway. In each layout, all the staterooms have en suite heads.

Note the open floor plan and the 360-degrees of glass and sunroof that adds to the interior's airy feeling and sense of volume.
Note the open floor plan and the 360-degrees of glass and sunroof that adds to the interior's airy feeling and sense of volume. (Courtesy Sirena Yachts/)A shade extends from the hardtop out to cover the cockpit dining table.
A shade extends from the hardtop out to cover the cockpit dining table. (Courtesy Sirena Yachts/)

Power for the Sirena 58 Coupé is twin 670 hp Volvo Penta D11 diesels or twin 900 hp Volvo Penta D13s. According to Sirena Yachts, the yacht's best range is approximately 850 nautical miles at 10 knots. The builder says typical cruising speed is 16 knots and top speed is about 26 knots.

For more information,visit: sirenayachts.com

Another look at the bilevel master suite option. See the stairs leading to the foredeck lounge?
Another look at the bilevel master suite option. See the stairs leading to the foredeck lounge? (Courtesy Sirena Yachts/)

Quick Specs:

  • Length overall: 61’
  • Max. beam: 17’7”
  • Draft: 4’1”
  • Fuel capacity: 950 Gal.
  • Freshwater capacity: 210 Gal.

Princess Yachts Launches Y78

Powered by twin 1,800-mhp MAN V12s, the Princess Y78 can reach speeds of 34 to 36 knots, the builder says.
Powered by twin 1,800-mhp MAN V12s, the Princess Y78 can reach speeds of 34 to 36 knots, the builder says. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

The Princess Yachts Y78 confidently blends performance and style.

The Y78 rounds out the builder's three-model Y-class series, which also includes a Y85 and a Y95. Powered with twin 1,800 hp MAN V-12 diesels driving five-blade propellers, the Y78 has a top-end range of 34 to 36 knots, according to the builder. The Y78 also has power-assist, electro-hydraulic steering with a hydraulic backup. Engine and gear shift controls are electronic too.

Just inside the sliding-glass door off the teak-covered cockpit, the salon has U-shaped seating and a coffee table to starboard with a two-person settee across from it. A retractable 55-inch LED TV has DVD and Blu-ray capabilities too. Forward and to port is an eight-person dining area with ocean views out the full-height windows. Low-back furniture ensures ocean views for all guests in the salon. Standard interior furniture is Rovera Oak or Alba Oak with walnut and Silver Oak optional.

In addition to a dining space that accommodates eight, the salon also has a 55-inch LED TV, bottle-and-glass stowage and a refrigerator.
In addition to a dining space that accommodates eight, the salon also has a 55-inch LED TV, bottle-and-glass stowage and a refrigerator. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

The galley is forward and to starboard abaft the helm station, and it's equipped with a four-burner electric cooktop, microwave-convection oven, twin stainless-steel sinks, a full-height refrigerator and freezer, an ice maker and a dishwasher. An electrically-operated sliding-glass partition separates the galley from the salon when desired. The lower helm has two seats and the pilot's seat is electrically adjustable. There is side-deck access for help with line handling when cruising shorthanded.

The Y78 has a four-stateroom layout with a full-beam master stateroom amidships. The space has a king-size berth, sofa, a dressing table with a chair, a built-in safe, a 40-inch LED TV, and dedicated access to the lobby area. The portside guest stateroom has two single berths while the starboard-side and forepeak staterooms have double berths. Each stateroom has an en suite head, with the starboard-side head also acting as the day head.

The Princess Y78 has a four-stateroom layout, each with an en suite head.
The Princess Y78 has a four-stateroom layout, each with an en suite head. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

This nearly 81-foot yacht also has a reversible hydraulic anchor winch with foredeck, main-bridge and flybridge controls. Additionally, the Y78 has stainless-steel cleats, fairleads and handrails. There is also a foredeck lounge for time with a book and a sun pad for four or more guests to work on their tan.

The flybridge is also set up for al fresco fun with room aft for three chaise-style lounge chairs (or a davit and tender), U-shaped settee with dining table to starboard and L-shaped settee that converts to sun pad. There is also a wet bar and electric grill to keep trips to the galley to a minimum. The helm is forward on centerline with two helm seats, protected by a retractable hardtop.

Salon view with satin-finish walnut. The galley can be closed off from the salon with this glass partition.
Salon view with satin-finish walnut. The galley can be closed off from the salon with this glass partition. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

With well-proportioned lines, solid performance and a family-friendly cruising layout, the Princess Yachts Y78 should appeal to yachtsmen looking to take their yacht size and style to the next level.

For more information, visit: princessyachts.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length overall: 80’9”
  • Max. beam: 18’11”
  • Draft: 5’8”
  • Fuel capacity: 1,585 Gal.
  • Freshwater capacity: 356 Gal.

Seakeeper’s Latest

The Seakeeper 18 is for yachts 65 to 75 feet length overall, or less than 56 tons.
The Seakeeper 18 is for yachts 65 to 75 feet length overall, or less than 56 tons. (Courtesy Seakeeper/)

Andrew semprevivo knows boaters are a little confused. While some of Seakeeper’s competitors describe gyrostabilizers in terms of torque, he prefers to discuss angular momentum because he thinks it’s ultimately more important for comfort on the water. The problem is, a lot of people have no idea what angular momentum is.

So, a quick lesson: A gyro moves fore and aft and releases torque. The faster the gyro moves, the higher the amount of torque, but it has less time to apply that torque because the motion is going so fast. The goal is to allow the torque to be applied for as long as the boat’s roll motion is happening—which is where angular momentum comes in.

“Let’s say the boat rolls four seconds; you don’t want to apply all that torque in one second,” Semprevivo says. “You want to time the gyro to match the roll rate of the boat. The higher the angular momentum, the more torque you can apply over that time period.”

Seakeeper’s touch-panel display shows a yacht’s roll angle in degrees, so owners can see precisely how the system is working.
Seakeeper’s touch-panel display shows a yacht’s roll angle in degrees, so owners can see precisely how the system is working. (Courtesy Seakeeper/)

Put another way, more angular momentum means a Seakeeper unit will work better for longer, which is what Semprevivo says the company has achieved with the Seakeeper 18 for boats from 65 to 75 feet long.

“What it really means is that we can put this gyro on a bigger boat and get the same level of roll reduction we were getting with the Seakeeper 16,” he says. “Or you can get the same amount of stabilization on the original boat in rougher conditions.”

Which, apparently, boaters want to do. Semprevivo says that when Seakeeper was founded in 2002, owners were thrilled to reduce roll by 50 percent. Then, yachtsmen wanted 60 percent. Then 70 and 80.

“When you think of engines, people think about horsepower- to-weight ratio,” Semprevivo says. “With this, you want to get the most angular momentum for the least amount of weight. That’s why we spin it as fast as we do. That’s why our flywheel is shaped the way it is, with most of the weight on the outer rim.”
“When you think of engines, people think about horsepower- to-weight ratio,” Semprevivo says. “With this, you want to get the most angular momentum for the least amount of weight. That’s why we spin it as fast as we do. That’s why our flywheel is shaped the way it is, with most of the weight on the outer rim.” (Courtesy Seakeeper/)Angular momentum is calculated by the weight and diameter of the flywheel and the speed at which it spins. The heavier and bigger the ­flywheel is, and the faster you spin it, the greater the angular momentum that can be achieved.
Angular momentum is calculated by the weight and diameter of the flywheel and the speed at which it spins. The heavier and bigger the ­flywheel is, and the faster you spin it, the greater the angular momentum that can be achieved. (Courtesy Seakeeper/)

“Now, people want to go on the boat and have no roll,” he says. That’s not currently possible—today’s systems need a little motion to follow wave contours—but the Seakeeper 18, he says, can reduce roll by as much as 95 percent. To most people, that feels like being tied up at the dock.

Semprevivo says Seakeeper tested the new units in the North Sea in 6- to 8-foot waves. The units, he says, reduced about 80 percent of roll. “But if you put in a big enough gyro with enough angular momentum, you could reduce it by 95 percent, even in those conditions,” he says.

As recreational boaters continue to ask for more stabilization, he adds, Seakeeper will keep working to provide it: “It’s pushing this product to levels that even we didn’t think were possible. We were thrilled at 60 percent. We thought that was the bar—that was 10 years ago.”

2020′s Latest Tech

Understanding the 2020 class of marine technology.
Understanding the 2020 class of marine technology. (Courtesy Garmin/)

Mother nature has long dictated that all rivers don’t flow evenly. This imbalance also holds true for the marine market, where marine electronics represent a significantly deeper and faster-flowing tributary than, say, naval architecture. The speed with which helm and safety equipment evolve was especially apparent during recent boat shows, where the marine-electronics tents were filled with bright lights and brighter ideas.

One of the most talked-about offerings was Vesper Marine’s Cortex safety-and-communications platform. This system streamlines VHF radio operations and delivers automatic information system, cellular, digital selective calling and Wi-Fi communications to a smartphone app or dedicated handset. Better still, Cortex gives users prioritized “situation views” for managing AIS targets, anchor-watch alarms and man-overboard emergencies, as well as on- and off-vessel smart alarms.

Likewise, Raymarine has scored big headlines with its prototype DockSense technology, which works with a yacht’s drive systems to provide an automated docking experience. This past fall, Raymarine unveiled its commercially available DockSense Alert system, which consists of a Raymarine Axiom multifunction display; the DockSense Alert app; a black-box processor; and one ($6,000), three ($10,000) or five ($15,000) FLIR-built stereo cameras bundled with built-in attitude and heading reference system (AHRS) sensors, which eliminate vessel movement.

There’s also a separate Raymarine AHRS and GPS module. Once installed, DockSense Alert significantly increases situational awareness by creating a precise, nearly 540-square-foot map of a boat’s surroundings—giving users real-time sensor metrics—and constantly scanning each camera’s range for nonwater objects.

Speaking of FLIR, Raymarine’s parent company has five new M300-series cameras. These include the daylight-only M300C ($6,500), which delivers a 30x optical zoom and a 12x digital zoom; the M332 ($8,500) thermal-imaging camera, which uses a Boson 320 core to deliver 340-by-256 thermal-image resolution; and the M364 ($14,200), which employs a Boson 640 thermal core to yield a 640-by-512 resolution. Next up is the M364C ($20,500), which includes the M300C’s daylight camera and a Boson 640 thermal core; followed by FLIR’s M364C LR ($29,500), which has a Boson 640 thermal core, the M300C’s daylight camera, a narrower field of view and advanced software that yields longer-range imagery.

Garmin’s big news involves four GPSMap 86 handheld navigation devices. All four units have 1.5-inch-by-2.5-inch screens, 16 gigabytes of onboard storage and rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. And all four models can stream real-time data from compatible Garmin-built MFDs. They can also remotely and wirelessly control a yacht’s compatible Garmin-built autopilot.

Simrad’s Halo20+ spins at 60 rpm when examining ranges up to 1.5 nautical miles, helping to track fast-moving targets.
Simrad’s Halo20+ spins at 60 rpm when examining ranges up to 1.5 nautical miles, helping to track fast-moving targets. (Courtesy Simrad/)

While all four handhelds provide significant navigation capabilities, not all GPSMap 86 handhelds are created equally. The GPSMap 86s ($400) comes with a base map and lets customers upgrade to Garmin’s optional BlueChart g3 cartography, while the GPSMap 86sc ($450) comes standard with this premium cartography pre-loaded. Garmin’s two top-end GPSMap 86 handhelds—the GPSMap 86i ($600) and the GPSMap 86sci ($650)—can send and receive satellite communications globally using Iridium’s Short Burst Data Service. The satcom feature provides the ability to send and receive two-way SOS communications and to access satellite weather forecasts. The GPSMap 86sci ships with Garmin’s BlueChart g3 cartography, while GPSMap 86i customers can buy this separately.

ACR Electronics introduced its Overboard Location Alert System transmitters, which are complemented by the SM-3 Automatic Buoy Marker Light. SM-3s ($130) are water-activated and self-righting, and they are designed to be thrown into the water after a man overboard, like a horseshoe life buoy. Once active, SM-3 lights provide 24-plus hours of continuous operation at 30 degrees Fahrenheit and are visible from 360 degrees for about 2 miles.

Onscreen visibility was on Simrad’s mind when it designed the Halo20 and Halo20+ pulse-compression radars, which come bundled in 20-inch radomes and weigh in at 11 pounds apiece. Both the Halo20 ($1,700) and the Halo20+ ($2,200) have Simrad’s InstantOn technology; four dedicated operating modes (bird, harbor, offshore and weather); dual-range capability; and the ability to track as many as 10 user-selected mini-automatic radar plotting aid (MARPA) targets at each range (20 targets total).

Both radars also deliver a range of 24 nautical miles, however, Simrad added extra processing power to the Halo20+. This boost comes in the form of Simrad’s VelocityTrack Doppler processing, which automatically color-codes targets based on the level of navigable danger they present. (While the Halo20+’s MARPA capabilities are limited to 10 user-selected targets per range, there’s no limit to the number of VelocityTrack targets it can track.) The Halo20+ also executes a 360-degree sweep once per second, and it spins at 60 rpm when examining ranges of up to 1.5 nautical miles. These latter attributes make the Halo20+ better at picking out fast-moving targets at close ranges.

Digital Yacht’s TriNav GPS160 position sensor uses a 72-channel GPS (United States), GLONASS (Russia) and Galileo (European Union) receiver to deliver position accuracy that’s typically within about 3 feet. The TriNav GPS160 ($190) updates at a user-selectable rate of up to 18 Hz (18 times per second), and it delivers accuracy by blending data from all three satellite systems—alternatively, users can opt to use data from just one particular system. The position sensor employs an anti-spoofing algorithm and is NMEA 0183-compatible, however, users also can buy versions compatible with NMEA 2000, USB, wireless and SeaTalk1.

Finally, because yachts are complex creatures, Blue Sea Systems’ M2 Vessel Systems Monitor promises to simplify the task of monitoring some of the complexity. The M2 VSM ($410) scrutinizes a vessel’s AC and DC electrical systems, and bilge and tank levels, while delivering NMEA 2000 compatibility. The tidy-size M2 VSM employs an OLED screen, and it provides comprehensive systems alarms such as high and low voltage, and high and low bilge and tank levels.

New Electronics

Video game casting.
Video game casting. (Courtesy Lowrance/)

Lowrance’s PSI-1 sonar module delivers LiveSight Sonar capabilities to HDS Carbon multifunction displays (with a separate LiveSight transducer). LiveSight Sonar allows for traditional-view and real-time sonar, with the latter creating a videolike experience that can show fish striking lures. PSI-1 ($300) modules can be networked directly to HDS Carbon MFDs by way of sonar ports and Ethernet connections. Check it out, at lowrance.com.

Lifesaving lumens.
Lifesaving lumens. (Courtesy Sirius Signal/)

Sirius Signal’s electronic visual distress-signal devices include the Bluetooth-enabled, dual-color C-1002 ($290 with app) and C-1003 ($90), both of which use LED bulbs. The C-1002 has a heat sink that allows it to deliver the same output as a 20-watt conventional light without overheating, while the C-1003 meets the US Coast Guard’s standards for night, day and audible distress signals. Check it out, at siriussignal.com.

LED there be light.
LED there be light. (Courtesy Lumishore/)

Lumishore’s line of marine-grade Lux LED lighting solutions ($30 to $245) is designed to work with DC-power systems to deliver the right ambience. Lux lights are color-tunable and include down lights, courtesy lights, strip lights and Neon Flex lights that can be controlled by most third-party multifunction displays, Lumishore’s touchscreen display or switches, or via a wireless device and Lumishore’s app. Check it out, at lumishore.com.

Next Level: Azimut Grande 25 Metri

The Azimut Grande 25 Metri has a fiberglass hull and carbon fiber superstructure.
The Azimut Grande 25 Metri has a fiberglass hull and carbon fiber superstructure. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

With a length overall of 85 feet, 3 inches, the Azimut Grande 25 Metri is the smallest yacht in the Italian builder’s Grande series, but she still comes with big style and features.

Stefano Righini did the exterior design, and Achille Salvagni handled interiors, incorporating colored lacquers that range from purple to powder blue for a modern, contemporary feel. The superstructure, roll bar, hardtop and transom are built using Carbon-Tech, keeping weight down while maximizing performance. The hull is fiberglass.

Four staterooms, including a full-beam master, are on the lower deck. In addition, there are quarters for three crew in two cabins.

The master stateroom spans the yacht's full 20-foot-4-inch beam. There are three guest staterooms.
The master stateroom spans the yacht's full 20-foot-4-inch beam. There are three guest staterooms. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)Achille Salvagni penned the Grande 25 Metri's open and modern interior design.
Achille Salvagni penned the Grande 25 Metri's open and modern interior design. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Standard power is a pair of 1,650-horsepower MAN V-12 diesels. With the optional twin 1,800-horsepower MANs, top speed is 29 knots and the cruising speed is 24 knots, according to Azimut. Active Trim Control automatically adjusts trim for better fuel consumption, and electronic power steering is designed to reduce maintenance.

At the helm, a Raymarine monitoring system acts as an interface for engine data, alarms, bilge pumps, tank levels, discharge pumps, engine-room ventilation, air conditioning, the sound system and more. The monitoring system also can be controlled via a tablet.

The yacht has a four-stateroom layout, plus two crew cabins.
The yacht has a four-stateroom layout, plus two crew cabins. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)Note the headroom above the forepeak VIP.
Note the headroom above the forepeak VIP. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

What are some other key specs for the Azimut Grande 25 Metri? Her fuel capacity is 2,060 gallons, and her water capacity is 290 gallons.

For more information, visit: azimutyachts.it

The foredeck lounge and sun pad offers a place for catching rays and sundowners with friends.
The foredeck lounge and sun pad offers a place for catching rays and sundowners with friends. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Quick Specs

  • Length Overall: 87’3”
  • Maximum Beam: 20’4”
  • Draft: 6’1”
  • Fuel Capacity: 2,060 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 290 Gal.
  • Power: 2/1,650 or 2/1,800 hp MAN V12 diesels

Cool Coupe

Hullside windows make the boat’s profile sleek and also let in natural light.
Hullside windows make the boat’s profile sleek and also let in natural light. (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

Ocean Alexander is known for building motoryachts that let owners traverse the globe in elegance. But that’s not all the builder can do, as recently evinced by the builder’s popular 45 Divergence center console. That platform has now been tweaked to become a 45 Divergence Coupe, that offers boaters a bit more protection from the elements.

The 45 Divergence Coupe has Ocean Alexander DNA all over it, with exceptional fit and finish for a boat of this size and class, including super-soft fabrics and intricate stitching on the upholstery.

Sunpads on the bowdeck offer another outdoor place for relaxation.
Sunpads on the bowdeck offer another outdoor place for relaxation. (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

One of the 45’s star features is its convertible bulwarks. In the cockpit, to port and starboard, the bulwarks fold out to create a party platform, increasing the boat’s beam from 13 feet, 9 inches to 19 feet, 1 inch. That means there is plenty of space to entertain.

Like other Ocean Alexander builds, the 45 Divergence Coupe was penned by acclaimed nautical designer Evan K. Marshall, who imbued the boat with a stepped sheer a steeply raked windshield that gives it a sleek, low-profile appearance.

The boat’s main deck can be sealed off from the outdoors.
The boat’s main deck can be sealed off from the outdoors. (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

The boat’s appearance fits her performance. With standard quad 350 hp Mercury Verados the Divergence Coupe should cruise in the neighborhood of 28 knots, consuming 61 gph, with a range of 316 nautical miles. At full speed, the vessel likely will top out near a very fun 41 knots. All four engines can move in unison, or move independently, split down the centerline.

As for interior comforts, the boat’s belowdecks area has 6 foot, 6 inch headroom as well as solid-wood cabinetry, large windows to either side and a skylight to help open the space up. There is a wetbar, GE microwave and Isotherm refrigerator to port, as well as a sink. A forward U-shaped settee with a high-low table handles indoor dining activities.

A broken shearline helps to strengthen this boat’s visual appeal.
A broken shearline helps to strengthen this boat’s visual appeal. (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

As for options, the 45 Divergence is available with wood choices, paint schemes and a Seakeeper 6 gyrostabilizer.

When it comes to the Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence Coupe sometimes big things really do come in small(er) packages.

www.oceanalexander.com

Foldout bulwarks to either side make this boat an excellent entertainment platform.
Foldout bulwarks to either side make this boat an excellent entertainment platform. (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

Quick Specs:

  • LOA: 47’5”
  • Beam: 13’9”, 19’1”
  • Draft: 3’11”
  • Std. Engines: 4/350 hp Mercury Verados
  • Fuel cap.: 500 gal.

Always In Style

The Vicem 67 Cruiser has classic motoryacht lines and is built via cold-molded mahogany.
The Vicem 67 Cruiser has classic motoryacht lines and is built via cold-molded mahogany. (Courtesy Vicem Yachts/)

Vicem’s latest launch––the 67 Cruiser––is a yacht that combines the builder’s skill in composite manufacturing and joinery with modern power and long-range capability.

The 67 Cruiser is built via cold-molded construction with mahogany and West System epoxy, creating a strong, yet relatively lightweight, hull. The hull-to-deck joint is glued and mechanically fastened, adding strength and rigidity. The yacht’s full-load displacement is 113,980 pounds.

Add in a hard-chine, planing hull form and twin, 1,000 hp Volvo Penta D13 diesels, and you get a yacht with admirable speed and range. Vicem reports the 67 Cruiser has a 25-knot top hop, and a comfortable 16-knot cruising speed. At cruise, Vicem reports an 800-nautical-mile range. Dial cruising speed back to 8 knots, and range reportedly climbs to 2,500 nautical miles.

For comfort on those extended cruises, the 67 Cruiser has a three-stateroom, four-head layout. All staterooms are en suite. The full-beam master is amidships and has a king-size berth. There is a forepeak VIP, also with a king-size berth. The third stateroom is abaft the VIP and to starboard with twin berths. There is a crew cabin option too.

The yacht has a best range of 2,500 NM at 8 knots, and an 800-NM range at 16 knots.
The yacht has a best range of 2,500 NM at 8 knots, and an 800-NM range at 16 knots. (Courtesy Vicem Yachts/)

When it comes to entertaining on board, there is an L-shaped settee to starboard and a smaller settee to port immediately upon entering the salon via the three-part, sliding-glass door. A formal dining table for four is also to port, positioned directly across from the galley, which can be open or partitioned off. (There is alfresco dining for six in the cockpit, protected by the flybridge overhang.) Just forward of the galley is the lower helm station, which also has side-deck access, a helpful setup for line handling shorthanded.

The upper helm on the 67 Cruiser’s flybridge is forward and to starboard, almost directly above the lower helm. The upper helm, and about half of the flybridge real estate is protected by a hardtop. There is a grill to port, U-shaped seating to starboard as well as room for two chaise-style lounges aft. There is space for a RIB and davit all the way aft.

For more information, visit: vicemyachts.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 70’9”
  • Maximum Beam: 18’1”
  • Draft: 5’8”
  • Fuel Capacity: 2,110 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 300 Gal.
  • Power: 2/ 1,000 hp Volvo Penta D13 diesels

Debuting Now: The Pearl 62

Bill Dixon penned the Pearl 62's lines. Note the extended flybridge overhang.
Bill Dixon penned the Pearl 62's lines. Note the extended flybridge overhang. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

The Pearl Yachts 62 is the entry-level yacht in the builder's flybridge series, which also includes an 80- and 95-footer. The 62’s exterior design is by Bill Dixon, with interiors by Kelly Hoppen.

There is a four-stateroom, three-head layout with three heads. The 62's master stateroom has a private entrance to starboard off the salon and is full-beam with an aft-facing berth. There is an en suite head with separate shower stall. Flanking the berth is a vanity to port and a two-seat breakfast nook to starboard. Hullside windows let in natural light and work in concert with the lighting and light-tone fabrics to keep the stateroom feeling open and airy.

The master stateroom is full-beam and has private access from the salon.
The master stateroom is full-beam and has private access from the salon. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

There are three guest staterooms, starting with a forepeak VIP with en suite head and step-up berth. Abaft the VIP to port and starboard are two twin-berth guest staterooms that convert to doubles. The portside guest stateroom has direct access to the third head, which is also accessed via the companionway. Like the master stateroom, all guest staterooms benefit from light coming in via hullside windows.

There is an option for a crew cabin aft, but most U.S. owners will likely use this space for PWC stowage.

There are three Volvo Penta IPS power options, ranging from 725 hp diesels to twin 900 hp diesels.
There are three Volvo Penta IPS power options, ranging from 725 hp diesels to twin 900 hp diesels. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

The Kelley Hoppen-designed interior offers owners four themes: Modern, Studio, Taupe and Luxury. Owners can choose from a selection of materials to personalize their yacht’s interior, including items such as suede and Calacatta marble.

The galley, equipped with Miele appliances, is positioned aft in the salon to easily service guests in the cockpit and in the salon. Across from the galley is a breakfast nook with a table and two chairs. There is U-shaped seating forward and to port, and a settee and helm console to starboard.

PWC stowage can also be used as a crew cabin. A hydraulic swim platform is optional.
PWC stowage can also be used as a crew cabin. A hydraulic swim platform is optional. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

Nearly 360 degrees of glass provides unobstructed sightlines from the lower helm, which has two seats. The 62’s power options are Volvo Penta IPS diesels, ranging in horsepower from 725 hp to 900 hp apiece (IPS950s, IPS1050s or IPS1200s).

Al fresco spaces include the cockpit’s U-shaped seating and dining table, a foredeck lounge with sun pads for four or more guests. The sun pads can also be shaded with an awning and four carbon fiber poles.

The galley aft lets the chef easily serve guests inside and outside.
The galley aft lets the chef easily serve guests inside and outside. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

The flybridge has an extended deck aft with L-shaped lounges to port and starboard, U-shaped seating and dining table amidships to port. A sun pad is forward with the helm console to starboard. Abaft the helm is a grill and a wet bar.

Some notable options for the Pearl 62 includes a Seakeeper gyrostabilizer, hardtop with sunroof, hydraulic some platform and side boarding door, to name a few.

For more information, visit: pearlyachts.com

There is a foredeck lounge and sun pad with flip-up backrests.
There is a foredeck lounge and sun pad with flip-up backrests. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 61’
  • Maximum Beam: 17’4”
  • Draft: 3’3”
  • Fuel Capacity: 762 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 211 Gal.
  • Power: 2/ Volvo Penta IPS950 (725 hp), IPS1050 (800 hp) or IPS1200 (900 hp) diesels

Hargrave’s First Millennium Yacht is Here

The 92 <i>GG</i> is the first yacht in Hargrave's Millennium series.
The 92 GG is the first yacht in Hargrave's Millennium series. (Courtesy Hargrave Yachts/)

Hargrave Yachts says the first yacht in its Millennium series has arrived at the Port of Palm Beach in Florida.

Christened GG, the Hargrave 92 “represents the next generation of design in this hot new market segment,” according to the builder. “ GG gives Hargrave the chance to showcase exactly what our unique custom-building skills can do.”

In addition to the 92-foot Millennium model, Hargrave also is developing 105-, 112- and 126-foot models. The 105 and 112 will each have five staterooms, while the 125 will be a six-stateroom layout.

Originally planned to debut at the Palm Beach International Boat Show, The 2020 Hargrave 105 <i>Irresistible</i> has an asking price of $9.8 million.
Originally planned to debut at the Palm Beach International Boat Show, The 2020 Hargrave 105 Irresistible has an asking price of $9.8 million. (Courtesy Hargrave Yachts/)

This is Irresistible: Also new from Hargrave is the 105 Irresistible, a 2020 launch that is available for showings in Fort Lauderdale. Her asking price is $9.8 million.

For more information, visit: hargravecustomyachts.com

Solar-Powered Cruising: Serenity 64

The Serenity Yachts 64 is the builder's first hybrid powercat and offers silent cruising at speed up to 6 knots.
The Serenity Yachts 64 is the builder's first hybrid powercat and offers silent cruising at speed up to 6 knots. (Courtesy Serenity Yachts/)

Serenity Yachts is promoting its Serenity 64, one of two models (with the Serenity 74) in the builder’s lineup of solar-powered yachts.

The Serenity 64 is built with a carbon-fiber hull, bulkheads, stringers, and can be customized to an owner’s wishes. PVC foam core adds rigidity and strength without weight. The main package has more than 700 square feet of SunPower solar panels, which the builder says allow for indefinite cruising at a speed of 4 to 6 knots—including the use of onboard amenities that draw power of their own.

There are more than 700 square feet of solar panels. Dropping the hardtop ensures all solar panels get sun exposure.
There are more than 700 square feet of solar panels. Dropping the hardtop ensures all solar panels get sun exposure. (Courtesy Serenity Yachts/)

Inside, creature comforts include four en suite staterooms, one crew cabin, and a galley-salon combination space. Other layouts are available. One setup creates a master suite that takes up an entire hull. In this layout, the galley and salon are combined into a single space on the main deck and there are two VIP staterooms with en suite heads. Another arrangement allows for dual master staterooms.

Owners can personalize their 64′s interior with woods such as wenge, oak, mahogany and more, as well as mahogany, teak or Amtico soles. Bulkheads can have a lacquer finish, fabric, vinyl or varnished veneers.

Serenity Yachts offers an array of layouts belowdecks to accommodate the yacht for private or charter use.
Serenity Yachts offers an array of layouts belowdecks to accommodate the yacht for private or charter use. (Courtesy Serenity Yachts/)

The helm is standard with a Garmin electronics suite and the galley is outfitted with equipment from Siemens and Samsung. The builder says other options are available upon request.

“We strive to lead the industry in green technology―the future of yachting―while continuing the luxurious, comfortable experiences that yachting provides,” Executive Director Boyd Taylor stated in a press release. “It is our passion to deliver vessels with solar technology that are performance-driven.”

The door on centerline offers foredeck access and it's watertight.
The door on centerline offers foredeck access and it's watertight. (Courtesy Serenity Yachts/)

About the Serenity 74: The bigger sister in the builder’s lineup has nearly 1,200 square feet of SunPower solar panels, which the builder says let her cruise at 7 to 9 knots.

For more information, visit: serenityyachts.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 64′
  • Maximum Beam: 31′
  • Draft: 3′6″
  • Fuel Capacity: 405.5 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 439.9 Gal.
  • Power: 2/200 hp Volvo Penta D3-200i diesels
  • Electric Motors: 2/ 24 hp Tema System SPM132-12
  • Top Speed Diesel: 16 knots:
  • Cruise Speed Electric: 5-6 knots

Meet the Huckins Sportsman 38

The Huckins Sportsman 38 has a reported 35-plus-knot top speed.
The Huckins Sportsman 38 has a reported 35-plus-knot top speed. (Courtesy Huckins Yacht/)

Huckins Yacht has launched Hull No. 1 of the Sportsman 38 at its shipyard in Jacksonville, Florida.

“We put her in the water about two weeks ago, and then took her out to finish,” Huckins owner Cindy Purcell said in mid-March. “She’s officially launched. We’ve run her on electric, we’ve run her on diesel. She’s 39 mph on diesel and about 8 mph on electric.”

Those numbers are right on target with the builder’s projections, Purcell says. The boat has twin 380-horsepower Cummins QSB 6.7s, and a 20 hp Elco EP. Or, owners can choose a pair of 350-horsepower Suzuki outboards.

The 38 Sportsman is based on the builder's original Sportsman yacht from 1936, complete with the builder's Quadraconic planing hull form.
The 38 Sportsman is based on the builder's original Sportsman yacht from 1936, complete with the builder's Quadraconic planing hull form. (Courtesy Huckins Yacht/)

In addition to thoroughly modern power options, the 38 Sportsman is built via sandwich construction with a CoreCell foam core and E-glass fabric for strength and rigidity. Kevlar (hull bottom) and carbon fiber (stringers and other strategic areas) is used to enhance strength without weight. The hull and topsides are painted with UV-resistant Alexseal coating.

The scissor berth offers a couple-size respite for overnights and weekends.
The scissor berth offers a couple-size respite for overnights and weekends. (Courtesy Huckins Yacht/)

The interior has mahogany joinery. There are Corian countertops in the galley, which is also equipped with a single-burner cooktop, refrigerator/freezer drawers and microwave convection oven.

Some notable options include a teak cockpit or Estec teak cockpit, mahogany transom, cockpit high-low table, Seakeeper gyrostabilizer, Lumishore underwater lights, wine cooler, barbecue grill, 8 kW Phasor generator and SureShade retractable awning, to name a few.

Opening up the scissor berth creates an all-weather dining space.
Opening up the scissor berth creates an all-weather dining space. (Courtesy Huckins Yacht/)

Huckins is planning for the public debut of the Sportsman 38 at the Newport International Boat Show this fall in Rhode Island. Until then, boaters are invited to the shipyard in Florida for a tour of Hull No. 1.

“Anybody who would like to see the boat can come to the yard,” Purcell says. “We can do a sea trial.”

An L-shaped settee and table provides space for alfresco meals and sundowners with friends.
An L-shaped settee and table provides space for alfresco meals and sundowners with friends. (Courtesy Huckins Yacht/)

What inspired the classic lines of the Huckins Sportsman 38? A 36-foot boat that Huckins built back in 1936.

For more information, visit: huckinsyacht.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 38′3″
  • MaximumBeam: 12′6′
  • Draft: 2′6″
  • Fuel Capacity: 285 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 95 Gal.
  • Power: 2/ 380 hp Cummins QSB 6.7 diesels or 2/ 350 hp Suzuki outboards
  • Electric Motors: 2/20 hp Elco EP-20s
  • Top speed: 35+ knots
  • Cruising speed: 30 knots
  • Speed w/electric motors: 7 knots

Dyna 63 Flybridge Has Arrived

The Dyna 63 is designed for the growing cruising family with a three-stateroom, two-head layout.
The Dyna 63 is designed for the growing cruising family with a three-stateroom, two-head layout. (Courtesy Dyna Yachts/)

Dyna Yachts, about a year after launching the 68 Skylounge in the United States, has welcomed the new 63 Flybridge to U.S. shores.

“The Dyna interior, the fit and finish, the space and volume—it's all unbelievable,” Mike Kutrybala, Dyna brand manager for United Yacht Sales, stated in a press release. “This boat is so well-planned and well-built, the differences are tangible as soon as you step on board. Dyna hit a home run, and we cannot wait to introduce it to everyone."

Cor D. Rover, a designer known for his work with leading builders such as Italy’s Benetti Yachts, designed the interior of the Dyna 63 Flybridge. Three guest staterooms—including a full-beam amidships master—are on the lower deck.

Al fresco dining is partially shaded by the extended flybridge overhang.
Al fresco dining is partially shaded by the extended flybridge overhang. (Courtesy Dyna Yachts/)

The main deck has indoor and outdoor dining, as well as soles made of what Dyna calls luxury vinyl plank.

“Dyna chose to use vinyl plank flooring on the 63 due to the fact that it’s easy to clean and maintain,” according to Kutrybala. “Owners do have the option though to select carpet if they choose.”

The lower helm has two Treben electrical, leather helm seats.
The lower helm has two Treben electrical, leather helm seats. (Courtesy Dyna Yachts/)

The interior wood is a high-gloss African cherry and belowdecks it's also African cherry, but in a matte finish. The master stateroom span's the yacht's full 16-foot-4-inch beam and has an en suite head. The forepeak VIP, also en suite, has a king-size berth. The third guest stateroom has side-by-side berths and shares the head with the VIP.

The Dyna 63's galley has granite countertops, a full-size LG refrigerator, Miele cooktop, convection oven and Danby wine cooler.

The Dyna 63's master stateroom is full-beam with a king-size berth.
The Dyna 63's master stateroom is full-beam with a king-size berth. (Courtesy Dyna Yachts/)

What’s the power package on the Dyna 63 Flybridge? Twin Volvo Penta IPS950s. A Seakeeper 9 stabilizer is optional.

For more information, visit: dynayachts.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 63′10″
  • Beam: 16′ 4″
  • Draft: 5′ 2″
  • Fuel Capacity: 800 gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 180 gal.

Sabre Launches 58 Salon Express

The Sabre 58 Salon Express is the new flagship of the builder's motoryacht series.
The Sabre 58 Salon Express is the new flagship of the builder's motoryacht series. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

Sabre Yachts in Maine has launched Hull No. 1 of the 58 Salon Express.

Power is twin 725-mhp Volvo Penta IPS950s that skippers can control from a glass-cockpit setup. During recent sea trials, Sabre reported a 26.7-knot cruise speed at 2,300 rpm and a top speed of 31.1 knots at 2,570 rpm. Fuel burn at cruise speed was 57 gph for a range of 337 nautical miles. At her top seed, fuel burn increased to 75 gph and the 58's range dropped to 299 nautical miles.

The 58 Salon Express has a modified-V hull form with 15-degrees transom deadrise and 24 degrees deadrise amidships, which should provide a seakindly ride in most conditions.

With twin 725-mhp Volvo Penta IPS diesels, Sabre reports a top speed of 31.1 knots.
With twin 725-mhp Volvo Penta IPS diesels, Sabre reports a top speed of 31.1 knots. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)The standard interior finish is high-gloss cherry and a teak-and-holly sole.
The standard interior finish is high-gloss cherry and a teak-and-holly sole. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

The Sabre 58 Salon Express, which is designed for family cruising, has three en suite staterooms. The full-beam master has a king-size berth. There is also a washer/dryer in the vestibule. The yacht's forepeak VIP has a 10-inch-thick queen-size berth, stowage drawers underneath, cedar-lined hanging lockers and a 32-inch HD LED TV. The VIP head has a separate shower stall with an acrylic door. The guest stateroom abaft and to starboard has a double berth that splits into twin berths with 6-inch foam mattresses.

Up on the main deck, the galley is aft with a two-burner induction cooktop, 24-inch Wolf drawer-style microwave oven and Sub-Zero fridge and freezer drawers with ice maker. The galley’s location allows for easy service to the interior or cockpit seating areas.

The 58 Salon Express has three staterooms. The master seen here has a king-size berth (76 inches by 80 inches) and en suite head.
The 58 Salon Express has three staterooms. The master seen here has a king-size berth (76 inches by 80 inches) and en suite head. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)The main-deck galley is aft and easily services guests in the salon and the cockpit. Those fridge and freezer drawers to the right are from Sub-Zero.
The main-deck galley is aft and easily services guests in the salon and the cockpit. Those fridge and freezer drawers to the right are from Sub-Zero. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

The yacht has a varnished cherry interior and a teak-and-holly sole throughout the yacht. Some options include a central vacuum system, FreedomLift tender lift and storage system, hydraulic swim platform, Seakeeper 16 gyrostabilizer, underwater lights and a teak cockpit, to name a few.

Does the Sabre 58 Salon Express have digital switching? Yes, with a system from CZone.

For more information, visit: sabreyachts.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 63′9″
  • Max. Beam: 16′2″
  • Draft: 4′9″
  • Fuel Capacity: 800 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 230 Gal.



Believe It or Not, This Yacht Was Built in 2015

The 111-foot <i>Olde Salt</i> looks like an older wooden yacht, but she’s actually a 2015 build with a steel hull. Asking price is about $9,900,000.
The 111-foot Olde Salt looks like an older wooden yacht, but she’s actually a 2015 build with a steel hull. Asking price is about $9,900,000. (Courtesy Northrop & Johnson/)

From the outside, the 111-foot Aegean Olde Salt looks like a classic wooden yacht, with her rounded stern, proud masts and teak detailing.

But she’s actually a 2015 build with a steel hull that won the top prize in her size range at the 2016 International Yacht and Aviation Awards—and now, she’s for sale through broker Richard Callender at Northrop & Johnson.

The asking price for Olde Salt is about $9,900,000.

Olde Salt has five ensuite staterooms for 10 guests, including a main-deck master. Eight crew are accommodated in three cabins.

Alfresco dining for 14 people is on both the main and upper decks, and the yacht is MCA compliant, should the new owner want to offer her for charter.

What’s the cruising speed of Olde Salt? It’s 12 knots, according to Northrop & Johnson.

Take the next step: contact Callender at northropandjohnson.com

New Designs from Tommaso Spadolini

The new Tomasso Spadolini designs include a 98- and a 141-footer.
The new Tomasso Spadolini designs include a 98- and a 141-footer. (Courtesy Tomasso Spadolini/)

Italian yacht designer Tommaso Spadolini, whose 40 years in the business has included work with Baglietto, Cantieri di Pisa, Wally and other well-known shipyards, has unveiled a series of “pocket superyachts” starting with two models: the Montecristo 30 and Montecristo 43.

“The name was inspired by a beautiful island in the Tyrrhenian Sea that I can see from my summer home by the seaside,” he stated in a press release.

The Montecristo 30 would be less than 200 gross tons, while the Montecristo 43 would be about 340 gross tons. Their sizes would bookend the series, whose other models would fall along the 100- to 140-foot range. All the models would have wide-body main decks to maximize interior space (including a full-beam master stateroom on the 30), foredecks with guest relaxation amenities (including pools), and terraced aft decks leading to the swim platform.

Each yacht also has a section aft on the sundeck that’s made of glass, to incorporate solar cells for auxiliary power. The engine room is configured with space for battery banks to allow hybrid propulsion and zero-emissions cruising.

“As a yacht designer, it’s my duty to look after the marine environment,” Spadolini stated in the release. “And I see more and more of my clients, perhaps encouraged by their children and grandchildren, taking a more proactive approach to sustainable yachting.”

How many awards has Tommaso Spadolini won for his yacht-design work? More than a dozen, most recently the 2018 World Yacht Trophies Best Designer of the Year.

20 New Products from ACR Electronics

The ResQLink 400, from ACR Electronics, is an attachable personal locator beacon, and one of 20 new safety products from the company.
The ResQLink 400, from ACR Electronics, is an attachable personal locator beacon, and one of 20 new safety products from the company. (Courtesy ACR Electronics/)

ACR Electronics displayed nearly two dozen new products at the Miami International Boat Show.

The products included personal locator beacons, AIS and MOB systems, searchlights, safety kits and a crew overboard light.

“We were extremely busy in 2019, and we have launched over 20 products that are now available and shipping worldwide,” the company stated in a press release.

ACR’s ResQLink personal locator beacons included the ResQLink View, which has optical display technology, allowing the screen to display GPS coordinates, operating instructions, usage tips, transmission bursts and battery power.

The RCL-95 has a 50,000-hour bulb life.
The RCL-95 has a 50,000-hour bulb life. (Courtesy ACR Electronics/)

New searchlights include the RCL-95, fitted with 10 ultra-bright Osram LEDs with reflector optics and 50,000-hour bulb life, for a peak beam intensity of more than 460,000 candelas. The light can cast an 8-degree beam over seven-tenths of a nautical mile, according to ACR.

Also new from ACR: The OLAS Guardian system, which can stop an engine within two seconds of a person or pet going overboard. It also triggers an 85-decibel alarm.

For more information, visit: acrartex.com

Hull No. 6 of the Otam 80 Due Soon

This Otam 80 has a custom layout and styling by Umberto Tagliavini. The foredeck has an adjustable table that can double the sun lounging space, and the expanded transom garage can hold a 13-foot Williams jet tender.
This Otam 80 has a custom layout and styling by Umberto Tagliavini. The foredeck has an adjustable table that can double the sun lounging space, and the expanded transom garage can hold a 13-foot Williams jet tender. (Courtesy Otam/)

Otam Yachts says Hull No. 6 of the Otam 80, christened Attitude, is nearing completion with delivery expected by the end of April.

Attitude’s public debut is planned for the Cannes Yachting Festival in September.

“The yacht Attitude is 80 percent complete,” the shipyard announced in a press release. “The engine room and systems are installed, and the interior outfitting is progressing on schedule for a technical launch in mid-March. Following commissioning and sea trials, she will be delivered to her owner at the end of April.”

This Otam 80 differs from her predecessors with a custom layout and styling by Umberto Tagliavini. The foredeck has an adjustable table that can double the sun lounging space, and the expanded transom garage can hold a 13-foot Williams jet tender. The cockpit has an updated layout with a custom music system; in “party mode,” the C-shaped sofa can seat 10 people, while at other times, the layout can be opened up.

Previous Otam 80s had two or three staterooms. Attitude has four, including a full-beam master.

What else is happening at Otam Yachts? The Otam 65 65HT is reportedly 75 percent done. Delivery to the owner is scheduled in May.

For more information, visit: otam.it

Reviewed: Sirena 88 RPH

Powered with twin 1,550 hp MAN diesels, the Sirena 88 RPH has a range of 1,660 nautical miles at 10 knots.
Powered with twin 1,550 hp MAN diesels, the Sirena 88 RPH has a range of 1,660 nautical miles at 10 knots. (Jeff Brown/)

In an old episode of the British car show Top Gear, there was an exchange between presenter Jeremy Clarkson and guest Simon Cowell about the latter’s order of a Mercedes-Maybach. Clarkson was ­dismissive of the car, but Cowell defended his choice, saying the Mercedes-­Maybach is not a car to drive oneself but, instead, a car to be driven in. The onboard ­experience is what matters most; form follows function.

I was reminded of that episode when I saw Sirena’s new flagship, the 88 RPH.

First and ­foremost, she is big. And that big ­epithet—at least where semidisplacement motoryachts of a ­similar ­designation are concerned—is a key ingredient of luxury. ­Argentina-born designer Germán Frers gave her a high bow and a nearly plumb stem that barely impinge upon her 88-foot length overall and 23-foot-2-inch beam. Just a couple of examples of how that design translates into spaciousness on board: The anchor locker in her prow measures 8 feet, and the headroom throughout most of her engine room is 6 feet, 5 inches. The headroom is better still in most of the accommodations.

The expanded use of structural glass enhances natural light and the sense of volume inside the 88. It also visually lowers the profile from the outside.
The expanded use of structural glass enhances natural light and the sense of volume inside the 88. It also visually lowers the profile from the outside. (Jeff Brown/)

As for oomph and the onboard experience, the first 88’s ­powertrain consists of twin 1,550 hp MAN V-12s, V-boxes, shafts and five-blade props spinning in half tunnels, facilitating a relatively modest draft of a little more than 6 feet. We were fairly heavy off Cannes, France, with 25 people aboard, 85 percent fuel, and the other tanks at close to 50 percent full or empty, depending on your disposition. (Her full-load ­displacement is 220,000 pounds.) The weather for our spell aboard was summer-evening ­glorious: a gentle breeze, sea-state negligible, which meant little action for her Humphree All Speed electric fins and Interceptor bars.

She managed a top-end speed of 22.9 knots, meaning just over 2,300 rpm on the rev counters and a total fuel burn of 160 gallons per hour. Sirena quotes a 25-knot maximum speed with a lighter load.

At 18 knots and 2,000 rpm, she ­consumes around 120 gallons of fuel per hour, so potentially, she has 430 nautical miles of range. At 10 knots, the V-12s whirred at just under 1,100 rpm and politely sipped their way through 17.5 gph, meaning at least a 1,660-nm range with the standard tanks; range increases 50 percent with optional long-range tanks. Indeed, bumble along at 9 knots, and she has the potential for more than 2,100 or 3,100 nm, depending on the tanks. Frers says the Sirena hull shape, which was thoroughly tank-tested prior to the first model launch, is ­particularly efficient across a wide range of hull speeds.

The flybridge has a full helm station and a retractable hardtop. There’s also a hot tub, a bar and U-shaped seating with a dining table.
The flybridge has a full helm station and a retractable hardtop. There’s also a hot tub, a bar and U-shaped seating with a dining table. (Jeff Brown/)

Her GRP hull is resin-­infused, and her deck and ­superstructure are a carbon-fiber hybrid. Floating doors reduce sound and vibration; ­decibel ­levels in the wheelhouse fluctuated from 52 dB(A) to no more than 65 dB(A), which is the level of normal conversation. Visibility to the horizon was good from the raised pilothouse, although inevitably that high bow will cast quite a shadow.

There is an asymmetry to the deck layout, in that the side decks are configured differently from one side to the other. The portside deck runs forward from the aft deck down to a galley door forward of the salon. The starboard-side deck runs forward to a set of steps that lead to the foredeck.

Heading inside from the aft deck, Cor D. Rover’s Amsterdam-based studio ­created a dark-oak ­interior that balances the bright natural light. The main deck has an open-plan salon and dining area, and owners can choose various arrangements of the furniture. The surrounding glass delivers splendid views; picture windows on each side include full-height sliding doors to the side decks. Farther forward are a galley to port and an ­entryway to ­starboard.

This desk with a view is found in the full-beam master stateroom on the main deck.
This desk with a view is found in the full-beam master stateroom on the main deck. (Jeff Brown/)

The owners’ full-beam ­master ­stateroom is forward on the main deck with ­full-height glazing along each side. A desk is to port, and there’s a full-beam head with a bath, shower stall and ­separate head ­compartment. The master also has private access to the foredeck, which has a ­rectangular hot tub. Tucked within deep bulwarks, the foredeck really works as a private terrace. There’s even a “secret garden path” to the space from the forward port corner of the flybridge, which has its own hot tub as well as all the usual alfresco essentials beneath a hardtop with an electric sunroof.

Four en suite guest staterooms are on the lower deck. The biggest is pretty much ­amidships, with the stateroom ­occupying two-thirds of the beam and the ­remaining third given over to the head. Two of the other staterooms have twin berths, and the ­stateroom at the bow has a double berth. The double-berth stateroom is virtually split-level; you walk up a few steps to get to the bed with hullside windows on either side, the lowest providing flanking views and the highest serving as skylights above the bed. (If I were guest aboard, this would be my spot.)

Sophistication and comfort in a bluewater hull.
Sophistication and comfort in a bluewater hull. (Jeff Brown/)

Cabins for three or four crew are between the engine room and owner’s stateroom. A beach club is all the way aft, beneath a lift-up transom door. This space doubles as toy stowage. The fixed stern platform and ­overhead crane can handle a tender weighing 1,760 pounds.

The Sirena 88 RPH has range if owners want it, speed when they need it, room for a growing ­family, first-rate fit and finish, and a design that stands apart. Jeremy ­Clarkson might not be impressed, but I was.

Take the next step: sirenayachts.com

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