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Philippe Briand Unveils Perfect 60 Concept

The Perfect 60 is a ketch with a carbon fiber mast and rig, and an inverted bow.
The Perfect 60 is a ketch with a carbon fiber mast and rig, and an inverted bow. (Courtesy Phillipe Briand/)

Longtime yacht designer Philippe Briand has unveiled the Perfect 60, a concept yacht that is a smaller sibling to the 300-foot SY 100 that he released this past spring.

The Perfect 60 is a ketch with a carbon fiber mast and rig, and an inverted bow. It is intended to combine motoryacht features with sailing yacht performance that’s strong enough to take line honors at regattas.

Briand says the design also is intended to reduce environmental impact. Underwater turbines are built into the concept, to harness power that would charge the onboard batteries.

How many Philippe Briand designs have been built? About 12,000, according to the firm. His company's current projects range from 19 to 344 feet length overall.

Take the next step: visit philippebriand.com

Intrepid Plans Three Debuts for Fort Lauderdale

The 477 Evolution is the lead's the builders Sport Yacht series, which also includes the 410 Evolution, 430 Sport Yacht and 475 Sport Yacht.
The 477 Evolution is the lead's the builders Sport Yacht series, which also includes the 410 Evolution, 430 Sport Yacht and 475 Sport Yacht. (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

Intrepid Powerboats is planning the premiere for three models at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show: the 477 Evolution, 407 Nomad and 345 Walkaround.

The 477 Evolution will be the new flagship in Intrepid’s Sport series. It will have a feature that hasn’t appeared on any other Intrepids: hull-side openings on both the port and starboard sides. A dive door is to starboard, with a hydraulic fold-down platform to port with a recessed swim ladder.

The 407 Nomad is the third boat, and the largest, in the Florida builder's walkaround series.
The 407 Nomad is the third boat, and the largest, in the Florida builder's walkaround series. (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

The 407 Nomad has a 700-gallon fuel tank, and is available with two console configurations. The SE has side entry to the head, while the FE has front entry to the head.

The 345 Walkaround is intended to pack some bigger-boat features into a smaller hull. It has a galley, a head with a shower, and a forward area whose U-shape seating and table convert to a berth.

The 345 has a 34'5
The 345 has a 34'5" LOA, a 10'6" beam and a 320-gallon fuel capacity. (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

Each boat can be customized: Intrepid offers numerous options that owners can choose for the new models.

Take the next step: go to intrepidpowerboats.com

Reviewed: Monte Carlo Yachts 66

The Portuguese bridge is one of many DNA traits inherent to Monte Carlo Yachts. Note the teak cap rail that helps to define the MCY 66’s sheer line.
The Portuguese bridge is one of many DNA traits inherent to Monte Carlo Yachts. Note the teak cap rail that helps to define the MCY 66’s sheer line. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

When I first saw the Monte Carlo Yachts 66, I thought back to my dad's 1956 Thunderbird. He spent the better part of a decade restoring his beloved two-seat convertible. The look of the '56 was unmistakable. There were its trademark short fins. A hardtop with porthole windows, and a soft top. Electric seats and power windows, both features almost unheard of in 1956. Whitewall tires. And chrome everywhere.

The look was so aligned with the Thunderbird brand, and so ingrained in the psyche of American motorheads, everyone knew her the minute they saw her cruising down the road, and the car always got a thumbs-up when people passed by.

The same sensation those drivers got seeing my dad’s car hit me when I saw the Monte Carlo Yachts 66 sitting quayside in Portopiccolo, Italy. ­Taking in her profile, it was ­immediately ­evident that Monte Carlo Yachts’ brand DNA is strong. And purposeful.

Light-tone fabrics and glass create a sense of openness.
Light-tone fabrics and glass create a sense of openness. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

For example, the yacht’s porthole windows amidships, flanking the full-beam master stateroom, are an MCY hallmark. My eyes moved from there to the ­carbon- fiber retractable hardtop shading almost the entire flybridge. There was the metallic hull paint. Finally, I gazed at the sweeping superstructure that flowed in the shape of a curious brow from the flybridge down toward the teak cockpit.

It’s because of these DNA traits, among others, that when MCY ­created its three 2019 models—a 70-footer has also launched, and a 76-footer is on its way—the builder chose not to make radical design changes but rather take an evolutionary approach.

Side decks are 15 inches wide.
Side decks are 15 inches wide. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

So what are the changes to the MCY 66 compared with her 65-foot ­predecessor? An extra foot of length, for sure. But there is more: The amidships portholes maintain the same shape as those on the 65, but they increased in size by about 20 percent, letting in more light and enhancing views. There is also about a foot of additional floor space in the new master. The builder repositioned the entrance to the stateroom and repositioned the shower to get those 12 inches.

Additionally, there are 45-inch-long rectangular windows with inset portholes flanking the forepeak VIP stateroom, which has an en suite head. (The MCY 65 just had portholes.) The rectangular windows are 13 inches at their widest point and 10 inches at their narrowest. They look black from the exterior and appear to lower the yacht’s profile. Headroom in the VIP is 6 feet, 5 inches. These attributes help create a sense of airiness.

A third stateroom is abaft the VIP to starboard with twin berths and access to a third head, which also serves as the day-head. There is a crew cabin for two all the way aft.

MCY reduced the thickness of the fiberglass superstructure versus the 65’s, increasing the glass that surrounds the 66’s salon. When combined with low-back furniture, the result is more light and a better connection between the interior and exterior spaces, not to mention the sense of openness on board.

The foredeck lounge can seat 10 people.
The foredeck lounge can seat 10 people. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

One measurable change from the MCY 65 is found on the MCY 66’s flybridge. Floor space here increased by about 40 square feet. What was once an L-shaped settee to port across from the helm is now U-shaped. There is also an L-shaped settee with a teak table abaft the helm bench seat. The retractable hardtop opens almost the entire flybridge to the sun.

One thing that remains the same is the yacht’s high freeboard and aggressive entry, reminiscent of the look found on sport-fishing yachts but not overdone. Her appearance says that she is willing to go head-to-head with the sea should it get into a snit.

Supporting the MCY 66’s take-on-the-salt aesthetic is a vacuum-infused fiberglass hull with foam coring. MCY says this build process optimizes the fiberglass-to-resin ratio and reduces overall weight. Internal aluminum supports further enhance strength. The yacht displaces 72,000 pounds (dry weight).

Fiberglass parts are post-cured in a three-stage process inside the builder’s 10,760-square-foot painting shed, which also functions as an oven. The room heats up to about 149 degrees Fahrenheit, and the stabilization process takes about 14 hours. The temperature then drops during the next 10-plus hours. This method reduces emissions while allowing for polymerization, which strengthens the fiberglass’s physical properties and should ensure long life for the hull paint.

Three staterooms and three heads is the standard layout on the Monte Carlo Yachts 66. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships.
Three staterooms and three heads is the standard layout on the Monte Carlo Yachts 66. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

MCY uses a modular build system to enhance construction efficiency. The hull, interior and superstructure are built in parallel. A one-piece interior module is completed in a jig, where workers can run wiring and glove-fit internal bulkheads, furnishings and the like. This setup allows staff to work both above and below the deck simultaneously, further expediting construction time. The process also helps keep build tolerances to within about 1 millimeter. Build time for an MCY 66, from the infusion to launch, is about four months.

The same level of organization applied to the MCY 66’s construction process is found in the yacht’s main-deck layout. Glass cockpit doors open to an ­unimpeded walkway on centerline from the ­cockpit to the helm forward. The galley is aft with Miele appliances, including a four-burner electric cooktop and ­­microwave/­convection oven. There’s also a full-height refrigerator.

When the sun gets high, drop in carbon-fiber poles and shade the foredeck lounge. In the evening, turn on the pop-up lights.
When the sun gets high, drop in carbon-fiber poles and shade the foredeck lounge. In the evening, turn on the pop-up lights. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

It’s one step up into the salon, which has an L-shaped settee to port and benches across. Light-tone furnishings, glossy white-and-gray marble, a gray oak sole, and lacquered Tanganyika wood work in concert, ­­creating a modern yet inviting space. The clean look could be defined as simple, but as designer Dan Lenard says, “Minimalism requires more work than opulence.”

The evolutionary design plan seems to work well for the Monte Carlo Yachts 66, and I’m sure that many yachtsmen will be giving her the thumbs-up as she passes by on the water.  Maybe even two.

Take the next step: montecarloyachts.it

New Year’s Yacht Charter in the Bahamas

The 125-foot Cheoy Lee <em>Nicole Evelyn</em> is available for New Year's in the Bahamas. The yacht accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms.
The 125-foot Cheoy Lee Nicole Evelyn is available for New Year's in the Bahamas. The yacht accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms. (Courtesy Ocean Independence/)

Ocean Independence says the 125-foot Cheoy Lee Nicole Evelyn is open for a New Year's booking of at least one week in the Bahamas.

Nicole Evelyn accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms. Four of the staterooms, including the main-deck master, are doubles. The final stateroom has twin berths, making the yacht an option for families chartering with children.

A hot tub is on the bridge deck in addition to the guest area on the sundeck, providing two open-air relaxation spots.

What's the lowest weekly base rate to charter Nicole Evelyn? It's $89,500. For the New Year's holiday, a premium may apply.

Take the next step: Contact a charter broker at oceanindependence.com

Lexus Launches 65-Foot Yacht

The LY 650 can reach a reported top hop of 33 knots and cruises at 217 knots for 321 nautical miles on a pair of optional Volvo Penta IPS 1350 diesels.
The LY 650 can reach a reported top hop of 33 knots and cruises at 217 knots for 321 nautical miles on a pair of optional Volvo Penta IPS 1350 diesels. (Courtesy Lexus/)

The luxury Japanese-car company enters the marine marketplace with the debut of its LY 650 sport yacht.

Lexus partnered with Italian yacht-design studio Nuvolari Lenard for the 65-footer's interiors and Wisconsin-based Marquis Yachts for its construction. The LY 650 recently made its debut in Boca Raton, Florida. The Lexus Sport Yacht Concept was first introduced in January 2017.

“The LY 650 symbolizes the challenges taken by Lexus, which aspires to be a true luxury lifestyle brand, to venture beyond the automobile,” Toyota President Akio Toyoda said. “A collaborative team between Toyota and Marquis Yachts introduced the Toyota Production System to the boat manufacturing facility to improve productivity and quality.

“I am truly looking forward to seeing the advanced, high-quality LY 650 display its beauty on the oceans and around the globe. As a mobility company, we are pursuing new possibilities for mobility, even on the sea.”

Lexus' 65-foot yacht comes standard with twin Volvo Penta IPS 1050 diesels.
Lexus' 65-foot yacht comes standard with twin Volvo Penta IPS 1050 diesels. (Courtesy Lexus/)

The LY 650’s construction is a combination of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic and glass-fiber reinforced plastic, creating a relatively lightweight, yet strong structure. The bulkheads are constructed of plywood and cork sandwich construction to help with sound attenuation. Deck lamination also has a foam-cork core for the same reason.

This Lexus yacht comes with LY-Link, software accessible by a mobile device that can monitor the LY 650 and send notifications via text message. LY-Link also allows owners to manage simple functions like the yacht’s air conditioning and lights.

Other technologies on the LY 650 include three 17-inch Garmin touchscreen displays at each helm (there’s one on the main deck with dual captain’s seats forward and on the starboard side and one on the flybridge). Yachtsmen, who are also audiophiles, can add a Mark Levinson surround-sound system with subwoofers.

Separated by a three-panel sliding door, the salon is set up with sofas and a galley aft. A 49-inch TV with 5.1 surround sound in the salon is also a standard feature with the LY 650. There is a lower helm forward with two seats.

The LY 650's master stateroom is full-beam amidships.
The LY 650's master stateroom is full-beam amidships. (Courtesy Lexus/)

Three staterooms are belowdecks, each with en suite head. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships.

Standard power for the LY 650 is twin Volvo Penta IPS 1050 diesels, but upgrades include twin IPS 1200s or IPS 1350s. Fuel capacity is 1,060 gallons. Lexus says the LY 650 can reach a top hop of 33 knots and cruises at 27 knots for 321 nautical miles with the largest engine option.

Other notable optional features include a hydraulic swim platform, anti-roll stabilizer, teak decking, a hardtop, a cockpit wet bar with a grill and ice maker, underwater lighting and cockpit joystick control.

For more information, visit: lexusyachts.com

Baglietto’s 213-Foot Concept Yacht Evolves

Note the superyacht's extensive hull-side glass.
Note the superyacht's extensive hull-side glass. (Courtesy Baglietto/)

The Baglietto shipyard in Italy has announced an update to its 213-foot concept yacht that was conceived in partnership with designer Francesco Paszkowski.

Shown for the first time last year, the concept yacht has darkened windows, an upper-deck pool with a transparent sole, and a “winter garden” that connects the indoor and outdoor spaces.

This 213-footer is designed with a pool on the upper deck.
This 213-footer is designed with a pool on the upper deck. (Courtesy Baglietto/)

The floodable garage can house a 33-foot tender, and an after area with side doors can become a beach club, gymnasium or pool when the tender is launched. Nearby are a sauna, hammam and other spa spaces.

How many guests could stay aboard? The layout has overnight accommodations for 12.

Where to learn more: visit baglietto.com

The Cost of Dream Yachts

"He gave it another go, but this time the engine went to pieces. There was no need to push the red stop button."
"He gave it another go, but this time the engine went to pieces. There was no need to push the red stop button." (Steve Haefele/)

As I studied the images from the other side of the planet, I thought of my last chat with my pal Bill. “It’s a milestone. There are important decisions to be made. I must go,” he insisted prior to embarking on a 24-hour flight to the shipyard responsible for his new build.

“It’s like attending a school play,” I joked. (I knew better.)

Milestone moments in yachting, like the one Bill was attending, do not mark feats of technical innovation or give honorable mentions for the fastest, longest or most expensive hulls. They are, instead, a series of celebratory moments during a yacht’s construction when the owner agrees to write a check. They’re typically spelled out in a contract and are anticipated much like the birth of a child. At least by the builder.

“I wanna see what I’m paying for, in person,” Bill said, arguing the other side.

I’ve attended such milestones as a designer, and I admit that I often went to collect a check. However, on occasion, I served an owner as a witness. Fiberglass hulls burped from tooling. Aluminum hulls rolled from their bellies to their bottoms. The delivery of engines. The mating of hulls and superstructures. I’ve seen it all—mostly all good; however, when things sour, standing between a payment and a yacht builder can be unpleasant.

In the 1980s, I was asked to observe the testing of a custom-built, 16-cylinder diesel in a seedy industrial area the owner did not wish to visit. My mission was to confirm that the engine produced the horsepower claimed. A dynamometer would offer proof, and a check would follow. The engine was bolted to the “dyno” (basically a large, hydraulic brake) and prepped for blastoff with fuel, water, air and exhaust plumbing.

Hiding in a control room behind a bulletproof-glass barrier, the builder pushed a green start button, and then nervously applied throttle and load. A clock-size gauge on the wall shot upward: 200 hp short. He gave it another go, but this time the engine went to pieces. There was no need to push the red stop button. The builder and I looked at the remains, and then at each other. It was an uncomfortable moment. I recall feeling sorry for him, but then again, I was suffering the onset of Stockholm syndrome.

I thought of the experience as I reviewed a shot of Bill’s hull swaddled in a cradle on the shop floor. The superstructure sat nearby.

“What do ya think, Coyle? Looks great, doesn’t she?” Bill gushed.

“Her sheer sweep is perfect and not a freckle. Wonderful,” I offered.

In truth, new construction shots are like baby pictures. I have yet to see one quite as perfect as the ones penned on Gerber baby-chow jars.

But, at Bill’s insistence, I considered the last image: the head compartment still on the shop floor. Bill was sitting on a box where the water closet would be plumbed, to offer scale.

“Ahhh…plenty of ventilation?” I quipped.

“Don’t BS me, Coyle. What do you really think?” he asked.

“OK,” I said. “In my opinion, the builder wants a check.”

Invictus Yacht Shows Scope at Cannes

Invictus Yacht's GT370 has a stern cabin that can accommodate two single berths or a combined one for couples, and a third berth can be placed in the forepeak.
Invictus Yacht's GT370 has a stern cabin that can accommodate two single berths or a combined one for couples, and a third berth can be placed in the forepeak. (Invictus Yachts/)

Invictus Yacht presented its full-model range from its X series and T series at this year’s Cannes Yachting Festival.

The CX270 and the GT280S, an outboard configuration of the GT280, made global debuts. Other yachts on display included the CX250, the GT320, the GT370, the FX200 and the FX240.

The CX270 was one of two Invictus yachts to make its global debut at Cannes. It has a reported top speed of 43 knots.
The CX270 was one of two Invictus yachts to make its global debut at Cannes. It has a reported top speed of 43 knots. (Courtesy Invictus Yacht/)

At 26 feet LOA, the CX270 was designed with ergonomics in mind. Its stowaway anchor allows for extra space on the main deck. The hull and superstructure is fiberglass construction. A teak swim platform is optional.

There is a foredeck sun bed measuring 6.5 feet by 7 feet. Belowdecks is a cabin that fits a 5-foot, 10-inch by 4-foot, 11-inch berth. Salon headroom is 5 feet 10 inches. Power is single or twin outboards up to a total of 400 horsepower. The builder says top speed with a single 350 hp Suzuki outboard is 43 knots.

Also making its global debut was the GT280S, enhancing the original GT280 with two outboard engines that total 500 hp. It has a reverse bow like its “big sisters” of the range, the GT320 and the GT370, which are both equipped with sterndrive motors.

The GT280S improves upon the original GT280 model with two outboard engines that total 500 hp.
The GT280S improves upon the original GT280 model with two outboard engines that total 500 hp. (Courtesy Invictus Yacht/)

The 320 has a centrally located, L-shaped dinette facing an outdoor galley equipped with a fridge, an ice maker and a grill. Invictus Yacht’s GT370 has a stern cabin accommodating two single berths or one larger berth for a couple. A third berth can be placed in the forepeak.

Invictus Yacht’s outboard range was rounded off by its FX240 and FX200 models. The 240 is available in cruising and fishing options. Some options include a hardtop in either fiberglass or fabric, a livewell to replace the stern seating and removing the sun bed for more fishing space.

The CX240 can reach a reported top-end speed of 36 knots with a single Honda 250CV outboard. Cruising speed is reportedly 22 knots.

For more information, visit: invictusyacht.com

Yacht Charter in Alaska

A yacht charter in Alaska is a breathtaking experience.
A yacht charter in Alaska is a breathtaking experience. (Unsplash/Darrin Henein/)

Chris fagan made his first trip to Alaska aboard the 130-foot Westport Serengeti in 2014. Back then, he was the mate; this summer, he's doing his fourth season on the yacht as captain.

The place never gets old.

“It’s the best nature and wildlife ­cruising ground that there is,” he says. “Just given the vastness of the wilderness and the abundance of gigantic wildlife, it’s a reminder of what the world is capable of. It doesn’t matter who goes with us, whether they’ve chartered all over the world or it’s their first time: Everyone leaves with their minds blown.”

The good news for charter clients, he says, is that even ­despite the grandeur to be explored, precious few yachts with ­professional crew make the run to Alaska each summer. A lot of times, ­Serengeti has had an anchorage all to herself.

The bad news for charter clients, Fagan says, is that given the small number of available yachts and the short season, primarily from June through August, the best boats tend to book up fast. As of early May, Serengeti already had nine charters scheduled for this summer.

“I would say a year out is when you start getting the first bookings, and it’s wise to book six months in advance,” he says, “especially if you want a prime date.”

Clients wanting to book any boat in Alaska, he says, should look not only for an experienced crew, but also for a boat that's outfitted for the area. Serengeti, for instance, has Isinglass on the main and top decks, allowing wide views without cold winds.

And it’s the views that count—especially given the realities of climate change.

“Of course, the glaciers are slowly receding, but they’re still there,” he says. “Who knows? A hundred years from now, some of them may be backed up farther than we can get to in a boat, but anybody who goes up now can experience that beauty.”

This 130-foot Westport, part of the Northrop & Johnson fleet, is among a handful of crewed charter yachts that visit Alaska every summer. The crew have figured out ­everything from onshore provisioners to ­onboard Wi-Fi. The yacht
is a 2002 build that was refitted in 2014 and was in the yard for annual maintenance as of early May. Tenders include a 34-foot Regulator that can be rigged for fishing, as well as an 18-foot Novurania for zipping in and out of ports from Juneau to Sitka. The lowest weekly base rate is $120,000 for 10 to 12 guests.
This 130-foot Westport, part of the Northrop & Johnson fleet, is among a handful of crewed charter yachts that visit Alaska every summer. The crew have figured out ­everything from onshore provisioners to ­onboard Wi-Fi. The yacht is a 2002 build that was refitted in 2014 and was in the yard for annual maintenance as of early May. Tenders include a 34-foot Regulator that can be rigged for fishing, as well as an 18-foot Novurania for zipping in and out of ports from Juneau to Sitka. The lowest weekly base rate is $120,000 for 10 to 12 guests. (Courtesy Northrop & Johnson/)Part of the Infinity Yacht Charters fleet, this 105-foot Broward also bases in Alaska each year, giving the crew advantages—compared with yachts visiting for just one season—when it comes to planning itineraries and experiences. She’s a 1982 build that, since 2012, has had more than $1.4 million in refit work. Most recently, in 2018, a new northern-lights generator was added. ­Accommodations are for six guests in three staterooms, and the weekly rate of $59,000 includes meals, fuel and some additional expenses that other yachts charge as add-ons.
Part of the Infinity Yacht Charters fleet, this 105-foot Broward also bases in Alaska each year, giving the crew advantages—compared with yachts visiting for just one season—when it comes to planning itineraries and experiences. She’s a 1982 build that, since 2012, has had more than $1.4 million in refit work. Most recently, in 2018, a new northern-lights generator was added. ­Accommodations are for six guests in three staterooms, and the weekly rate of $59,000 includes meals, fuel and some additional expenses that other yachts charge as add-ons. (Courtesy Infinity Yacht Charters/)

What to expect in Alaska

  • Charter Itineraries typically take place between Juneau, Alaska's capital, and Sitka, in the southeast part of the state that borders Canada.
  • The sounds of the glaciers as they calve, cracking off chunks and dropping them into the sea, is as loud as the roar of lions or a low-flying plane.
  • Whales, bears, bald eagles and other wildlife are all around, so have a camera ready, ideally with a long lens.
  • Try the candied salmon, which is eaten as a stick, kind of like beef jerky.

Nordhavn 100: The Global Angler

<em>Serenity</em> on the Pacific Northwest's sometimes fog-shrouded waters.
Serenity on the Pacific Northwest's sometimes fog-shrouded waters. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

When most yachtsmen think of sport-fishing yachts, they likely conjure up images of long waterlines, flared bow sections, skyscraper tuna towers and planing-friendly undercarriages. Expedition-grade trawlers do not come to mind.

And for good reason. Expedition vessels are built for itineraries measured in days or weeks, not in the number of hours it takes to zip out to the canyons. Most expedition yachts struggle to crack the 15-knot barrier, a speed deficiency that most anglers cannot abide.

With Serenity, a heavily customized Nordhavn 100, the longtime builder of world-class expedition yachts sought to break those stereotypes. Serenity's owner worked with the California-based builder to create an expedition-grade sport-fishing yacht that's as adept at wrangling pelagic species as she is at hosting elegant dinners.

Interior design work is by Destry Darr Designs.
Interior design work is by Destry Darr Designs. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

I first spied her proud silhouette dominating the western skyline of Seattle's Elliott Bay Marina last fall, but I didn't fully appreciate her capabilities until I stepped into her steering room with Capt. Zach Gallagher. There, on the bulkhead, hung 30-plus custom-made fishing rods, each slightly different than the next but each painted the exact same Alexseal "Stars and Stripes" blue—perfectly matching Serenity's custom-painted topsides—and handsomely engraved with the superyacht's moniker. Gallagher also showed off dozens of reels, including serious-looking hydraulic setups, gaffs and fishing tackle, all organized and stowed in custom-built cabinets.

“If you think this is cool, wait until you see the fishing cockpit,” he says with a knowing smile.

Serenity is a stretched version of Nordhavn's N96, which itself is based on the N86's hull, adding a 10-foot extension to the "California deck" (­Nordhavn ­parlance for the outdoor space abaft the salon). Serenity's owner evolved this long-range cruising design for his angling ambitions by requesting an additional, low-freeboard aft fishing deck and swim step. Additionally, the owner worked with Destry Darr Designs to create five en suite staterooms and an enlarged galley with seating for four guests around an island.

<em>Serenity's</em> salon has seating for 10 guests and a drop-down screen for entertainment and news.
Serenity's salon has seating for 10 guests and a drop-down screen for entertainment and news. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

“The owner wants to introduce his family to a full international cultural experience,” Gallagher says as we walk from the galley to the salon, which has a table with seating for 10 and a drop-down screen. The table’s after end leads to a carpeted seating area that spills out onto the California deck.

Climbing the spiral ladder and stepping into the pilothouse, I see a helm with a marble dash, two white leather Stidd seats, four Furuno touchscreens, and a combination of Furuno, Simrad, FLIR and KVH equipment for long-range navigation and security, as well as satellite communications and entertainment. Suffice it to say, this yacht can cruise far while staying in touch.

<em>Serenity</em> is a stretched version of Nordhavn's N96, which itself is based on the N86's hull but with a 10-foot extension to the
Serenity is a stretched version of Nordhavn's N96, which itself is based on the N86's hull but with a 10-foot extension to the "California deck." (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Serenity's propulsion comes from twin 600 hp Caterpillar C18 Acert engines sitting atop vibration-absorbing mounts and spinning dual 48-inch propellers. DC power comes from dual Caterpillar C4.4 generators. An ABT-Trac stabilization system should enhance ride quality, while a pair of 50 hp bow and stern thrusters are installed for docking maneuvers.

Serenity is also equipped with four fuel tanks collectively holding 7,000 gallons of diesel, plus a 500-gallon centerline tank that serves as her day-use dromedary, and 100 gallons of gasoline for her tender. All told, Serenity has a 3,000-nautical-mile ­cruising range at 10 knots. She also carries a U.S. Coast Guard-­approved TidalWave HMX waste-management system, allowing her crew to discharge safely and legally, further facilitating the owner's off-the-grid ambitions.

"The N96s carry 900 gallons of fresh water, but we have 1,000 gallons," Gallagher says, adding that Serenity's two Dometic Sea Xchange watermakers each generate 1,800 gallons of potable water every 24 hours. "We have no daily water ration. We just carry extra filters."

The yacht carries an enlarged galley with seating for four guests around a center island.
The yacht carries an enlarged galley with seating for four guests around a center island. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Serenity also carries a quiver of toys, including eight sets of dive gear, a dive-tank air compressor and an 18-foot aluminum-bottom RIB that's hoisted via a Nautical Structures crane rated to 3,500 pounds. Additionally, Serenity sails with four surfboards, four stand-up paddleboards and two Jet Skis.

Gallagher guides me through Serenity's master stateroom, just abaft the bridge, noting the custom Miele coffee maker and the room's wraparound views. Stepping onto the owner's deck, Gallagher lights the yacht's fire pit, which is protected by a glass shroud and flanked by two deck chairs. I notice a box fitted to the starboard quarter rail and walk over to inspect a set of rudder, throttle and thruster controls.

“It was the owner’s idea,” Gallagher says. “All of [these] controls are mounted backwards because you’re facing aft when you’re using them.”

The flybridge has a table with a leaf and seating for 10, plus a Wolf gas grill, a Miele grill, a sink, fresh water, refrigerators and ice makers.
The flybridge has a table with a leaf and seating for 10, plus a Wolf gas grill, a Miele grill, a sink, fresh water, refrigerators and ice makers. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Next, he leads me to the flybridge, which has a second helm and a table with a leaf and seating for 10. “We’ve got a Wolf gas grill, a Miele teppanyaki grill, a sink, fresh water, refrigerators and ice makers here,” Gallagher says. “We can cook the whole meal up here.”

Abaft the flybridge’s protective coachroof sits a Jacuzzi with a custom awning and cushions. I glance over the rail at the water below, guesstimating the drop to be a solid 20 feet. Gallagher reads my mind. “The owner’s kids and I jumped from up here when we were down in the Sea of Cortez on the boat’s shakedown cruise,” he says, with a been-there-done-that smile. “They’re up for anything.”

The fishing deck is our final stop, and I can tell that Gallagher is keen to show off his boss’s brainchild.

“The owner is an experienced boater and is really drawn to fishing,” Gallagher says as we admire the side deck’s 30-foot teak runs. “Take an avid fisherman and multiply by 10, and that’s the boss man.”

The owner worked with Destry Darr Designs to create an accommodations plan with five en suite staterooms.
The owner worked with Destry Darr Designs to create an accommodations plan with five en suite staterooms. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

This much becomes obvious as we step onto the open fishing deck. Gallagher points out the 10 inset fishing-rod holders mounted around the teak rail, as well as the receptacle that accommodates the yacht’s Bluewater Large Marlin fighting chair.

“The chair’s got a three-axis mount and a 360-degree swivel, an offset swivel, and 11 rod holders,” he says. “We have handheld and hanging scales for weighing fish, and we’re hoping to catch one that’s big enough to need to hang from the crane.”

The fishing deck also has portable livewells, along with tackle boxes and floodlights for nighttime work. Gallagher says landed fish quickly graduate from the rod to the kill box to the fillet table to the vacuum sealer to the custom cockpit freezer. Once frozen, the fillets are transferred to one of Serenity's two deep freezers.

“I try to take all of the family’s interests into account when planning itineraries,” Gallagher says, adding that nonfishing activities have included paddling around icebergs, spotting grizzly bears and whales, and visiting mountain hot springs. “If it’s a guys’ fishing trip, the boat will be set up ­differently than if it’s a family cruise.”

<em>Serenity's</em> fishing deck has portable livewells, along with tackle boxes and and floodlights for nighttime work. After they're landed, fish graduate to the vacuum sealer and then, once frozen and filleted, to one of the yacht's two deep freezers.
Serenity's fishing deck has portable livewells, along with tackle boxes and and floodlights for nighttime work. After they're landed, fish graduate to the vacuum sealer and then, once frozen and filleted, to one of the yacht's two deep freezers. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Serenity's owner took delivery in Dana Point, California, in June 2018, following a three-year build. He immediately started voyaging. There was a shakedown cruise to the Sea of Cortez that was followed by a cruise to Canada's Desolation Sound and then a more ambitious third trip that took the boat from Campbell River, British Columbia, to Alaska's Glacier Bay as well as Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof islands before ending in Juneau.

These passages have been 10 to 14 days in length, but Gallagher says the boat is spec'd for world cruising. "Serenity can carry 13 ­people on board for 11 days without taking on provisions," he says.

Granted, that's not running at 30 knots, but Serenity—as her name suggests—offers the ability to cruise, fish and ­explore in style and comfort, sans the usual durational and ­latitudinal limitations. Most important, she's equipped to ­cater to her owner's love of hunting pelagic species and enjoying quiet, far-removed anchorages.

“The owner wanted to go anywhere and fish the whole time,” Gallagher says. “When he’s aboard, we spend zero time at the dock.”

Amen.

Take the next step: nordhavn.com

Outer Reef to Debut Generation II 720 DeluxBridge

This second-generation Outer Reef Yachts DeluxBridge 720 has a reported range of 3,400 nautical miles at 8.5 knots.
This second-generation Outer Reef Yachts DeluxBridge 720 has a reported range of 3,400 nautical miles at 8.5 knots. (Courtesy Outer Reef Yachts/)

Outer Reef Yachts is planning for the world premiere of its Generation II 720 DeluxBridge at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

The yacht, Gypsy Soul, is a skylounge model with a reported cruising range of 1,400 nautical miles at 11 knots. With the throttles pulled back to 8.5 knots, range increases to 3,400 nautical miles, according to the builder; top speed with optional power is 20 knots.

On the main deck are a salon with a sunlight, and a country kitchen-style galley. The skylounge is increased in size from previous models and has a day head as well as a bar.

Another new design element is what Outer Reef is calling a Bridgeview Deck, forward of the sky lounge and helm station. It has seating for two and a cocktail table, as well as glass protection from the wind.

Are you going to the Fort Lauderdale show? Look for the Outer Reef Generation II 720 DeluxBridge at BC Dock.

Take the next step: outerreefyachts.com

Sabre to Debut 58 Salon Express

The Sabre 58 Salon Express’ blue hull and white superstructure create a classic Downeaster appeal.
The Sabre 58 Salon Express’ blue hull and white superstructure create a classic Downeaster appeal. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

It’s hard to stand out in a crowded field of midsize, Downeaster-style yachts, but that’s exactly what Sabre hopes its 58 Salon Express will do. The ­vessel is the new flagship of the Salon Express line, which starts at 38 feet length overall. Construction on Hull No. 1 of the 58 is underway, with Sabre most recently tweaking the galley layout to make room for a dishwasher.

The 58 Salon Express will have a resin-infused, modified deep-V planing hull with 15 degrees of deadrise at the transom, a design that is meant to split apart the chop and to maintain stability at slow speeds or on the hook. She also will have a relatively shallow draft of 4 feet, 9 inches, which makes her an option for boaters who frequent skinny-water destinations such as the Bahamas or the west coast of Florida. Up above, a 17-foot, 9-inch air draft (with a mast) should let her glide easily below most bridges.

A dining area is opposite a ­settee in the salon, allowing for conversation among groups while keeping a clear pathway to the aft deck. Note the good views through the windows.
A dining area is opposite a ­settee in the salon, allowing for conversation among groups while keeping a clear pathway to the aft deck. Note the good views through the windows. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

On board, a door will open fully, sliding from port to starboard and connecting the cockpit and salon. The design aim here is to make the interior and exterior feel as though they are one. This sensation is meant to be heightened by the salon windows, which are sized to allow in lots of natural light.

The 58’s pilothouse will have a galley with a U-shaped counter to port, and a cooktop, sink, and that newly added dishwasher to ease cooking and cleanup tasks.

The full-beam master stateroom has a king berth. Its en suite head has designer accents such as stainless-steel towel bars and a wood-trimmed mirror over the sink.
The full-beam master stateroom has a king berth. Its en suite head has designer accents such as stainless-steel towel bars and a wood-trimmed mirror over the sink. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

At the helm, skippers will have a Volvo Penta joystick for easier docking and close-­quarters maneuvering, twin Stidd N Series helm seats, and an access door to the starboard-side deck. Triple windshield wipers with multispeed settings and washers connected to the freshwater system should help ensure that sightlines stay clear of slosh and spray.

Down below, this yacht will have an en suite, full-beam master stateroom with an island king berth and a choice of tile for the head’s sole. Both of the guest staterooms are en suite as well, a layout that should help to maintain privacy.

The cockpit has a fixed table for dining and cocktail hour. The hardtop has an electrically operated sunroof. Foredeck hatches are low profile and rimmed with stainless steel.
The cockpit has a fixed table for dining and cocktail hour. The hardtop has an electrically operated sunroof. Foredeck hatches are low profile and rimmed with stainless steel. (Courtesy Sabre Yachts/)

The Sabre 58 Salon Express is a versatile design that’s intended to be equally adept as a dayboat and for longer excursions. Hull No. 1 should launch in October, with her public debut expected at the Miami International Boat Show in February.

Take the next step: sabreyachts.com

KVH Aims to Give American Magic an Edge

KVH has installed its TracPhone LTE-1 and the satellite-based TracPhone V3-HTS for American Magic's chase boats.
KVH has installed its TracPhone LTE-1 and the satellite-based TracPhone V3-HTS for American Magic's chase boats. (Courtesy KVH/)

KVH Industries has been named an official supplier of New York Yacht Club American Magic, a challenger for the 36th America's Cup.

In an effort to create high-speed data transmissions that allow for a competitive edge, KVH installed satellite- and cellular-based communications equipment for the team’s chase boats. In addition, KVH is providing fiber-optic gyro-based sensors to aid in performance metrics for the team’s race boats.

“We are proud to support New York Yacht Club American Magic in its challenge for the America’s Cup,” Martin Kits van Heyningen, chief executive officer of KVH, stated in a press release. “There is special meaning for us since the America’s Cup is part of KVH’s history, with our very first product developed for a 12-meter yacht preparing for the 1980 America’s Cup.”

The connectivity equipment KVH installed includes the TracPhone LTE-1 and the satellite-based TracPhone V3-HTS. The two systems will be configured for least-cost routing, ensuring uninterrupted and cost-effective data delivery via automatic switching between LTE and satellite services.

Where will the technology be used? It's expected to be part of the training in Newport, Rhode Island, and Pensacola, Florida, as well as in Italy.

Take the next step: click over to kvh.com

Wingsail Yachts?

VPLP’s Komorebi mega-yacht series is designed around a combination of electric engines and wind power.
VPLP’s Komorebi mega-yacht series is designed around a combination of electric engines and wind power. (Courtesy VPLP/)

French design house VPLP is using its experience penning grand prix-racing sailboats, ­including the America’s Cup winner BMW Oracle Racing 90, to create an expedition-grade trimaran series from 130 to 260 feet. The Komorebi series will have a hybrid propulsion system with electric engines and fully automated wingsails—a first for expedition-level cruising.

Unlike rigid, film-paneled America’s Cup wings, VPLP’s Oceanwings use supporting carbon-fiber spars and (possibly ­photovoltaic) sailcloth that’s ­hoisted to create two-element wingsails.

While VPLP says it has several ­interested customers, to date the Komorebi concept exists only as lines plans and scale models. Marc Van Peteghem, VPLP’s co-founder, points to three main challenges in reaching this point: hoisting and lowering sailcloth, reefing, and wingsail trim, all of which will be tackled by automation.

Komorebi designs have heliports and seaplane-lifting cranes.
Komorebi designs have heliports and seaplane-lifting cranes. (Courtesy VPLP/)Electric or ­hydraulic actuators raise and lower sailcloth, and reef and trim the wings.
Electric or ­hydraulic actuators raise and lower sailcloth, and reef and trim the wings. (Courtesy VPLP/)Computer modeling indicates that the Komorebi 130 will cruise at 15 knots under power. VPLP designed the Oceanwings for efficiency at all wind angles and velocities to generate a 12-knot cruising speed using primarily wingsails, not the props.
Computer modeling indicates that the Komorebi 130 will cruise at 15 knots under power. VPLP designed the Oceanwings for efficiency at all wind angles and velocities to generate a 12-knot cruising speed using primarily wingsails, not the props. (Courtesy VPLP/)

The wingsail-powered trimaran platform should deliver less roll ­motion than catamarans and greater comfort and speed than monohull yachts. “A wing can work at every ­apparent wind angle—it’s one of [its] big strengths,” Van Peteghem says. “With no wind, only the engine will be used; up to a certain wind speed, both engine and wing will play together, and above [this wind speed] it could be only wingsail. It’s very flexible.”

Take the next step: vplp.fr

Custom Limo Tender

This Cockwells limo’s sliding glass roof can be clear or turn to a dark tint at the touch of a button.
This Cockwells limo’s sliding glass roof can be clear or turn to a dark tint at the touch of a button. (Theo Ormrod Davis/)

When the owner of the 207-foot Hakvoort Scout went searching for a tender, he needed to look no further than Cockwells. The British builder turned out a 26-foot-3-inch limo intended to mirror her mothership's design. T/T Scout has a bold, bright-yellow hull and a dual-section glass roof that slides fore and aft above the seating space. She can hold 10 guests and two crew, and can scoot across the harbor at 37 knots, according to Cockwells.  Whom It's For: The owner of Scout, of course. However, Cockwells can build this highly ­­customized model for anyone with a taste for forward-thinking design and a desire for a luxurious ride between port and mothership.  Picture This: You've just commissioned a 180-footer and are celebrating with a glass of bubbly on the docks at Port Hercules in Monaco. You've already begun thinking about potential tenders when a little yellow limo zips by and catches your eye. One of those would be about right, you think as you pull your phone out of your pocket. It's time for your next purchase.

Take the next step: cockwells.co.uk

Bluegame BGX70 Debuts

The Bluegame BGX70 is the builder's new flagship.
The Bluegame BGX70 is the builder's new flagship. (Courtesy Bluegame Yachts/)

Italy-based Bluegame Yachts premiered its Bluegame BGX70 at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

The yacht, with interior and exterior design by Zuccon International Project, is the new flagship for Bluegame, which is a division of Sanlorenzo. Other yachts in the Bluegame fleet are the BG42 and BG62.

The BGX70 is fiberglass on the outside with natural woods, leathers and fabrics on the inside. The design has two lounge areas connected by an interior staircase, and the use of glass is intended to feel like the outdoors and indoors are all part of the same space.

An internal staircase connects the salon with the upper lounge space.
An internal staircase connects the salon with the upper lounge space. (Courtesy Bluegame Yachts/)Note the lounge-centric cockpit layout. Owners can stow a tender here too.
Note the lounge-centric cockpit layout. Owners can stow a tender here too. (Courtesy Bluegame Yachts/)

How fast does the Bluegame BGX70 go? Twin 900-horsepower Volvo Penta IPS1200s are standard, and twin 1,000-horsepower Volvo Penta IPS1350s are optional. With the optional package, the builder advertises a cruise speed of about 27 knots and a top hop of about 30 knots.

Take the next step: visit bluegame.it

Sea Turtle Savior

Lemuel Pemberton has a devoted following of volunteers, including local youth who help him count turtle eggs and more.
Lemuel Pemberton has a devoted following of volunteers, including local youth who help him count turtle eggs and more. (Tina Thuell/)

When Lemuel Pemberton first thought about launching a turtle conservation program on Nevis, he wasn’t even sure if the Caribbean island was home to enough turtles to make a monitoring program worthwhile. The answer proved a resounding yes. Not only were loggerheads foraging offshore, but there were nesting populations of leatherback, green and, especially, hawksbill turtles. Pemberton founded the Nevis Turtle Group in 2003.

After starting out with small night patrols of nesting beaches, Pemberton has gained valuable partners. He developed a sea turtle conservation program for the Four Seasons Resort Nevis, where hatchlings disoriented by the resort’s lights were crawling toward the swimming pool rather than the ocean. Prince Harry paid a visit from the United Kingdom in November 2016, working with Pemberton at Lovers Beach—the island’s top nesting site—to release hatchlings and conduct an egg count. “That was the highlight of the season,” Pemberton says.

He also has created a strong volunteer corps among local youth. “They’re now able to do the egg counts, tagging and measuring all on their own,” he says. “It’s exciting to pass on this work from one generation to the next.”


How did it feel to host Prince Harry? That was an exciting time for the Nevis Turtle Group. People all around the world heard about us and the work that we do.

After all these years, what still thrills you about working with turtles? It's a thrill to see the same turtles return. We have fewer green sea turtles, so when you see one you tagged in 2004 coming back in 2018, you feel happy.

How can visitors participate in Nevis Turtle Group activities? They can come along on a turtle watch with us from June through December. They can learn more at our website, nevisturtlegroup.org.


Pemberton's Picks on Nevis

Lovers Beach: It's the best beach for turtle watching.

Esmie's Sunrise (St. James Parish): It's great for local food and atmosphere, and authentic local music. It's adjacent to the historic Eden Brown Estate.

Boddie's Café (Charlestown): Enjoy great local food while you take in the sights and sounds of Charlestown.

Sunshine's Bar, Lounge & Grill (Pinney's Beach): Come here for the seafood and the world-renowned "Killer Bee" rum punch.

Reviewed: Maritimo X50

The Maritimo X50 combines sophistication and style, just like the waters in and around Sydney, Australia.
The Maritimo X50 combines sophistication and style, just like the waters in and around Sydney, Australia. (Courtesy Maritimo/)

The Quays Marine Centre on Pittwater sits about 11 miles north of the central business district in Sydney, Australia—but you'd never know it. On the winter day when I boarded the Maritimo X50 at the marina, the water temperature was about 65 ­degrees Fahrenheit, and the air temperature matched it—though it felt warmer because the air was so dry. In fact, there was so little moisture in the air that the Pittwater region's high bluffs and headlands, marbled with woods, appeared to be in high definition. The slightly blue leaves on the uncountable gum trees were individually visible at a few hundred yards, and the forest spilled toward the olive-green sea as if to take a swim itself. Freshwater waterfalls pattered down the rock in the bare spots, and World War II-era pillboxes stood abandoned in the woods, still holding watch for a fight that never came.

I stood mesmerized by the view—and by the fact that the cosmopolitan Sydney Opera House was calling from so close by—as our captain revved the X50’s twin 670 hp Volvo Penta D11s. Off we went at about a 28-knot cruising pace. We quickly came across a pod of fur seals lounging on a boulder and pulled up close for a look, with the captain using the Volvo joystick to maneuver us around for better angles.

The Sydney Opera House hosts more than 1,500 performances a year.
The Sydney Opera House hosts more than 1,500 performances a year. (Courtesy Maritimo/)

Maritimo principal designer Tom Barry-Cotter climbed up to the vessel’s foredeck and leaned against the 3-foot-tall bow rails. The captain turned the boat ever so slightly, and Barry-Cotter, off-balance momentarily, called back to us in the cockpit with a nervous laugh: “Don’t want to fall in there, mate. Where there’s seals, you know what else there is.”

We scanned the water for any monstrous shadows lurking below the surface. This was Australia, after all.

The many mansions lining the harbor as we cruised closer to downtown Sydney could make for a premium architectural tour. The multimillion-dollar dwellings range from modern to Mediterranean, all with expansive ocean views. There is a theory that water views are so sought after because human beings are wired to associate water with a continual food source, creating a calming effect on the psyche. That may or may not be true, but either way, Maritimo designed the X50 to have the same effect. That calming sensation of being near the water is especially found in the X50’s optional beach club, which is a noteworthy feature on a yacht that’s 52 feet, 7 inches length overall. The space can be arranged in a few ways, including as a third stateroom; this hull had two director’s chairs facing aft at a leather-embossed desk, creating a unique way to pound out those last few hours of work (had the yacht been on the hook). Forward in the beach club, a flat-screen TV was above a sink, counter and wine chiller, for when the work was done. A head to port lent the beach club a bit more autonomy, while the hydraulic swim platform was three steps up, allowing for an easy dip.

Like most Maritimo yachts, the X50 has an aft galley that serves the salon and cockpit.
Like most Maritimo yachts, the X50 has an aft galley that serves the salon and cockpit. (Courtesy Maritimo/)

Inside, the U-shaped dining settee in the salon also offered excellent water views thanks to windows built low enough to see out of while I was sitting. Aft, the galley had a bounty of locally caught prawns and oysters sitting on ice, with prep room at the island counter, and sandwiches in the 6-foot-tall refrigerator. We tucked into a beachside cove for lunch. The scene was perfection, with bright and clean skies, a soft breeze, and children and dogs frolicking on the sand.

But then, just as we were about to moor, an ugly kur-dur-dur-dur-dur-grunk came from below. One of the yacht’s props caught a stray mooring that had some sort of metal sheathing.

Our intrepid captain stripped down to his skivvies and, after a deep breath to psych himself up, plopped overboard to untangle us—sharks and cold water be damned.

The overhang shades the whole cockpit on the Maritimo X50, providing refuge from hot midday sun or passing rain showers.
The overhang shades the whole cockpit on the Maritimo X50, providing refuge from hot midday sun or passing rain showers. (Courtesy Maritimo/)

It says a lot about the Maritimo X50’s seaworthiness that we were soon back on our way, headed outside into open water, still pointed south toward downtown Sydney. The seas were rather rough, with high winds lopping the tops off 6-foot rollers. I took the helm, and at 19 knots, the yacht’s hand-laid, vinylester-resin hull felt solid. It was quiet as she dropped into the troughs time and again. Grooves to either side of her windshield aided in whisking water away if it came up over the bow, keeping the sightlines excellent. We passed a kayaker, a man perhaps 20 years old, all by himself, churning his paddle like a windmill over the blue-gray humps of ocean—another testament to the intrepid Aussie spirit, I suppose.

After about a half-hour, we reached the towering headlands that stand like sentries on either side of the entrance to Sydney Harbour. The seas smoothed out as the waterway revealed itself, bustling with ferries, tugboats and recreational craft. As we turned a final bend, the sun dipped low and light glittered off the greasy-smooth harbor’s surface. The Opera House and the Sydney Harbour Bridge, landmarks adjacent to each other, came into view.

The Maritimo X50 has a full-beam amidships master stateroom with twin 6-foot-tall hanging lockers.
The Maritimo X50 has a full-beam amidships master stateroom with twin 6-foot-tall hanging lockers. (Courtesy Maritimo/)

The captain slowed the boat to a crawl off Fort Denison, which served as a notorious prison in its past. In 1796, a British convict named Francis Morgan was hanged there for a murder. Up on the gallows, Morgan was asked for any final words. He reportedly responded that the only thing worth mentioning was the superb view of the harbor from the high elevation and he was sure there were no waters the world over to compare with it for beauty.

While there was no doubt a laundry list of terrible decisions and acts that led Morgan to end up on those gallows, he certainly had keen powers of observation.

Take the next step: maritimo.com.au

Reviewed: Princess Yachts Y85

Princess created multiple alfresco social zones on board the Y85, such as the foredeck lounge with sun pads and U-shaped seating.
Princess created multiple alfresco social zones on board the Y85, such as the foredeck lounge with sun pads and U-shaped seating. (Quin Bisset/)

A round table is less formal than a rectangular one. Round tables have equal seating, and everyone converses comfortably across the meal. Round tables might even be called relaxed. Round tables are democratic.

And if there is one feature of the Princess Yachts Y85 that defines the personality of this model, it's the dining table in the salon. It's round.

With the Y85, the British builder looked to create a yacht that has all the luxuries that fans of the Princess brand expect but with comforts that also make the spaces feel relaxed. The Y85 is a yacht that can be owner-operated or run with a captain, and its features imbue the rich onboard spaces with casual touches. The combination of luxe design and family-friendly amenities is a credit not only to Princess but also to naval architect Bernard Olesinski and the Italian design firm Pininfarina.

A partition drops to close off the galley.
A partition drops to close off the galley. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

As one example, just steps from the dining table is an open galley, unless you press a button. Then, a partition rises, separating the galley. With the partition open, the space is family style with built-in stools at the counter. Closed, the space becomes formal. There’s a casual touch—only if it’s desired.

The ambience also helps to set the mood on board. There is a 9-foot-8-inch-wide window next to the table, starting just a few inches off the walnut sole and stretching up nearly 5 feet, forming what used to be called a picture window. The bulkhead outside is low, with teak-capped stainless-steel rails, so there is nothing to block ocean views. Forward, a bar has a hidden wine chiller, drawers fitted for glassware and bottle stowage.

Just abaft the table is a sprawling U-shaped couch facing a pop-up TV, creating a comfortable media room for just that: sprawling. And the casual touch continues from there through twin sliding doors to the cockpit. The doors disappear behind the outboard panel, creating an alfresco feel in the salon.

The salon sole is walnut, and the round table represents the laid-back refinement found on board the Y85.
The salon sole is walnut, and the round table represents the laid-back refinement found on board the Y85. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

The new decor of the Princess Y85 serves as a precursor for future models’ styling. There are swoopy curves in the recessed ceiling, which has glossy walnut trim. These identical swoops are replicated in the headboard of the master stateroom. In the curves of the galley divider. In the top of the vanity in the master stateroom, and in the leather of the helm seats.

A few steps forward on the main deck is a day-head, convenient for guests as well as for the skipper in the pilothouse. The helm area is another gathering place and can be closed off for night running or salon privacy. Guests can sit at a raised dinette to port, while the skipper and companion have raised seats with armrests next to a pantograph door for side-deck access.

Our test Y85 had a Garmin electronics suite with three displays at the lower helm, including a Boening touchscreen display for ship’s systems.

The salon’s low-back furniture maximizes the views out of the windows, which span the superstructure.
The salon’s low-back furniture maximizes the views out of the windows, which span the superstructure. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

The galley also has a door to the side deck to make provisioning easier. Chefs get a Wolf cooktop, induction oven and Sub-Zero fridge. There are ice makers and wine chillers in the galley and on the bridge.

The master stateroom spans the yacht’s 20-foot-8-inch beam, allowing for a centerline king berth, a desk/vanity to port, and two love seats with a table to starboard for morning coffee or an evening aperitif. This stateroom also has a walk-in closet, and a double-sink head is aft with a shower. (A note: When James Noble, Princess’ vice president of marketing, and I were exploring the master, the yacht was running at full throttle in the open sea, yet it was so quiet that noise barely registered on my sound meter. We talked in normal tones despite thundering 1,900 hp MAN V-12 diesels just a few feet away.)

The VIP stateroom forward is notable for having a walk-in closet and an en suite head, and each of the other guest staterooms—one a double, one with twins—has private head access.

A breakfast nook to port of the helm keeps guests and the captain within earshot while en route to the next waypoint.
A breakfast nook to port of the helm keeps guests and the captain within earshot while en route to the next waypoint. (Courtesy Princess Yachts/)

I’ll admit to being surprised that, when the hammer went down, there was a lot more Princess S (sport) series than I expected from a Y (yacht). The Y85 topped out at almost 28 knots while moving about 73 tons of luxury appointments, leather and marble—a speed made even more notable because this was the initial sea trial before the full break-in. According to Princess, this yacht should hit 30 to 31 knots when the engines are settled. And this Y85 had returned from a Princess owners’ rendezvous in the Bahamas, reportedly covering more than 180 nautical miles across the Gulf Stream in nine hours.

Up top, the flybridge is fully covered by a fiberglass hardtop with a louvered sunroof, eliminating sliding parts and canvas. There’s an alfresco entertainment area with a dinette to port facing an L-shaped bar, and settees for guests surround the ­skipper. The helm electronics—monitors and all—­disappear into the dash at the flip of a switch. Aft, a spa is optional where the boat deck stretches nearly 18 feet from rail to seating. This space also could be used for a tender launched by the Opacmare crane, or left open for sun lounges.

The Princess Y85 is a comfortable take on elegance. The yacht offers luxury when guests want it and casual relaxation when it’s preferred, no matter who’s invited to sit at the table.

Take the next step: princessyachtsamerica.com

Brokerage: Offshore 76

One of the 76’s optional, semicustom features is a private stairway to the master stateroom.
One of the 76’s optional, semicustom features is a private stairway to the master stateroom. (Courtesy Offshore Yachts/)

Offshore yachts was an early adopter of fiberglass construction, dating back to 1958. Its semidisplacement hull forms—such as the one found on its ­­bluewater-capable Offshore 76—are known for their deep forefoot and low center of gravity.

Standard power is 1,015 hp Caterpillar diesels. The 76 we got aboard had 1,360 hp MAN diesels. Cruise speed: 18 knots.

Accommodations included three staterooms and three heads, plus a crew cabin for two.

At press time, there was a new-build 2020 Offshore 76 for sale, and a 2010 model listed at $2.36 million.

From the Archive
"Construction quality is high, with solid vinylester resin ­below the waterline, full-length and athwartships ­foam-filled ­stringers, and oversize ­stainless-steel engine beds. Many builders use aluminum frames around the salon windows, but the salt water turns the frames rusty in no time. On the 76, the frames are all molded fiberglass. The underside of every hatch is finished, and the bilge has a smooth layer of gelcoat." —Yachting, September 2008

For more information, visit: offshoreyachts.net

Reviewed: Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence

The Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence has foldout platforms to port and starboard.
The Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence has foldout platforms to port and starboard. (Forest Johnson/)

Ocean Alexander, long known for building ocean-crossing motoryachts, has launched its first center-console: the 45 Divergence.

The builder leveraged its large-yacht expertise to create this feature-filled dayboat, which has port and starboard bulwarks aft that fold down to create balconies. This setup extends the 45’s beam from 13 feet, 9 inches to 19 feet, 1 inch. With the bulwarks up, a patented “door within the door” enables boarding from the sides. A wraparound swim platform allows for boarding at the stern.

The vessel’s razor-sharp lines and sleek styling are from Evan K. Marshall, a longtime collaborator on Ocean Alexander’s larger models. The 45’s stepped sheer, raked windshield and low-profile hardtop convey performance.

Powered by quad 350 hp Mercury Verado outboards, the 45 has a cruise speed of 28 knots at 4,500 rpm. At this speed, the engines consume 61 gph, giving the boat a 316-nautical-mile range. The 45 will top out at just over 41 knots. Range: 237 nautical miles. And for maneuverability, all four outboards can move in unison, or the portside two can move separately from the starboard-side two.

Within the walkaround deck layout is seating for 14 guests. There’s a curved bow seat with a table, an oversize lounger forward of the console, and three bolstered helm seats along with aft-facing cockpit seating and a fold-down transom bench seat. An electric high-low, foldout, carbon-fiber table is centered in the cockpit.
Within the walkaround deck layout is seating for 14 guests. There’s a curved bow seat with a table, an oversize lounger forward of the console, and three bolstered helm seats along with aft-facing cockpit seating and a fold-down transom bench seat. An electric high-low, foldout, carbon-fiber table is centered in the cockpit. (Forest Johnson/)

At the helm, the vessel’s triple Llebroc cross-stitched helm seats are abaft a Garmin electronics suite with three 17-inch multifunction displays for charts, radar, SiriusXM and sonar.

Abaft the helm seats is a cabinet that houses a retractable flat-screen TV, a Scandvik stainless-steel sink and faucet, a two-burner Kenyon cooktop, a Kenyon grill, and a U-Line refrigerator.

Marshall’s interior focus was to enhance the owner’s experience. To that end, the belowdecks layout is pleasantly sized with 6-foot-6-inch headroom. Solid-wood cabinetry, side and forward windows, and a skylight enhance the open feeling here. A console and wet bar to port have a GE microwave, Isotherm fridge drawer and Scandvik sink.

The 45 Divergence can be tailored for owners who like diving or fishing. A transom livewell could serve as scuba-tank stowage. Fish-box freezer plates can be installed to keep the catch cold, while additional rod holders, including six built into the transom, are a good idea for fishing from the platform. Outriggers are also available.
The 45 Divergence can be tailored for owners who like diving or fishing. A transom livewell could serve as scuba-tank stowage. Fish-box freezer plates can be installed to keep the catch cold, while additional rod holders, including six built into the transom, are a good idea for fishing from the platform. Outriggers are also available. (Forest Johnson/)

Forward is a U-shape settee with a high-low dining table that converts to a queen berth. To starboard is a head that has a clear Ambassador Marine basin sink, a Tecma toilet and a window. There’s a separate shower stall.

Options include wood ­choices, paint schemes and matching engine colors. A ­Seakeeper 6 ­gyrostabilizer is available, as are an 11-kW Kohler diesel ­generator and a KVH ­satellite-TV system.

With big-boat features and sporty performance, Ocean Alexander’s 45 Divergence has a good shot at attracting dayboat enthusiasts and yacht owners who want a stylish tender. She’s definitely a break from the norm.

Take the next step: oceanalexander.com

Amels Inks Deal for 206-Foot Yacht

Amels has sold a 206-Foot Limited Editions superyacht that is scheduled for a spring 2020 delivery. Its owner plans to cruise destinations around the world.
Amels has sold a 206-Foot Limited Editions superyacht that is scheduled for a spring 2020 delivery. Its owner plans to cruise destinations around the world. (Courtesy Amels/)

Dutch yachtbuilder Amels has sold an Amels 206 Limited Editions. It's scheduled for delivery in spring 2020 to an owner from the Asia-Pacific region.

With exterior design by Tim Heywood, the 1,131-gross-ton yacht will have a light gray hull and white superstructure. Interiors will be by Laura Sessa.

Onboard features will include two bridge-deck VIP staterooms, round windows in the owner’s stateroom and enclosed stowage forward for two 26-foot tenders.

“The Amels 206 is a proven performer and a real head-turner,” Managing Director Rose Damen stated in a press release. “She is a beautiful yacht with striking curves. We’re proud to be completing this yacht for our client and can’t wait to see her on her maiden voyage next year.”

One of several sales: Amels is part of Damen Shipyards, which also recently sold a 246-foot support yacht. When that vessel is delivered in 2022, it will be the largest Damen support yacht constructed to date.

Where to learn more: go to amels-holland.com

Vesper Marine Unveils Cortex

Cortex, from Vesper Marine, is a VHF radio with wireless touchscreen handsets, a built-in Class B SOTDMA smartAIS transponder, and remote vessel monitoring.
Cortex, from Vesper Marine, is a VHF radio with wireless touchscreen handsets, a built-in Class B SOTDMA smartAIS transponder, and remote vessel monitoring. (Courtesy Vesper Marine/)

Vesper Marine has unveiled Cortex, a VHF radio with wireless touchscreen handsets, a built-in Class B SOTDMA smartAIS transponder, and remote vessel monitoring.

“Innovation in AIS technology, touchscreen devices and vessel monitoring has skyrocketed in recent years, but marine VHF hasn’t kept pace and remains an anachronism,” Jeff Robbins, CEO of Vesper Marine, stated in a press release. “Cortex fundamentally changes how you interact with safety communication systems.”

The touchscreen handset is intended to simplify functionality. Touching a vessel’s icon onscreen and pressing “call” makes a direct DSC call to that vessel. Cortex continuously shows crossing situations and navigation light sectors. As many as 10 handsets, either wired or wireless, can be used, and a 10-watt speaker output enables louder audio and alerting.

Cortex includes dual-watch, favorite channels and one-handed operation via a click wheel. Pressing the dedicated man overboard button activates a track back mode on all handsets and marks the MOB waypoint on NMEA 2000-connected multifunction displays.

The smartAIS technology alerts boaters of potentially hazardous situations. It combines navigation sensor data such as wind speed, GPS and AIS information with intelligent alarm management that prioritizes alerts.

Cortex can send alerts about anchor drag, as well as changes to wind speed, wind direction and water depth.

Automatic updates: New features and capabilities are downloaded automatically to the Cortex Onboard App, for updates via WiFi.

For more information, visit: vespermarine.com

Personal Submarines: Luxury in the Deep

The desire that many yacht owners have to explore the world’s oceans goes far beyond the water’s surface.
The desire that many yacht owners have to explore the world’s oceans goes far beyond the water’s surface. (Jong Marshes/)

Being the first person to see something is an experience that can surpass all others, create exhilaration that borders on euphoria and, maybe most important, win every dinner-party conversation for a decade. Craig Barnett, the sales-and-marketing manager for Triton, says the desire to have that kind of experience is a key reason why so many yacht owners want personal submarines.

“Once you have your Ferrari and your yacht and your private jet, and you’ve traveled the world, it’s all about augmenting your reality,” he says. “How can you enhance your experience? With a yacht, you’re scratching the surface of the sea. With a sub, you’re discovering a whole new level.”

In fact, according to insiders at Triton as well as U-Boat Worx, yachtsmen are embracing more than just the spirit of adventure. They’re ordering semicustom and custom submarines the same way they look beyond production yachts to custom builds, wanting to have a half-dozen or more friends and family members underwater with them, as well as fineries that range from leather interiors and Bluetooth sound systems to Champagne chillers and more.

A three-person Super Yacht Sub from U-Boat Worx explores the wreckage of a crashed airplane.
A three-person Super Yacht Sub from U-Boat Worx explores the wreckage of a crashed airplane. (Rob Aarsen/)

U-Boat Worx alone is now offering 100 options on its various sub models, and Triton is seeing yacht owners outfit subs in increasingly interesting ways. Hulls No. 9 and 10 are now in build of the Triton 3300/3, which is the company’s most popular model, able to dive with three people (including the pilot) to 3,300 feet. “You can fit them out with extra cameras and all that stuff for documentary filmmaking,” Barnett says. “You can load them up with ­scientific instrumentation. We have one owner who uses it for archaeology and salvage. They’ve been practical and useful. Now, in the past 18 months, we did the concept and engineering with Aston Martin to take the sub into the serious luxury realm. It’s not just a fanciful idea. We intend to build them. That will happen.”

Don Walsh (center) reached the bottom of the Marianas Trench in 1960. Here, he watches a monitor of Vescovo’s dive.
Don Walsh (center) reached the bottom of the Marianas Trench in 1960. Here, he watches a monitor of Vescovo’s dive. (Reevejolliffe/)

The rise in popularity of submarines is coinciding with increased interest in expedition and support yachts, which clients and yacht builders have been embracing for a number of years now. The current generation of yachtsmen is looking beyond ports such as St. Barth’s and Monaco; they want the ability to cruise far, far beyond the ­traditional itineraries that their parents enjoyed in the Caribbean and Mediterranean. About 100 explorer yachts of at least 80 feet length overall are in build today, Barnett says, and in May, the Monaco Yacht Club hosted the first conference focused on expedition-style yachting. Charter clients also are looking for go-farther opportunities, such as spending a week aboard the 254-foot expedition yacht Legend in Antarctica, where charters come with a submarine.


“We’ve only adequately studied 8 percent of the world’s oceans. i’d suggest there’s a lot of work left to do.” - Don Walsh
“We’ve only adequately studied 8 percent of the world’s oceans. i’d suggest there’s a lot of work left to do.” - Don Walsh (Tamara Stubbs/)

Victor Vescovo

In April, as part of the Five Deeps Expedition to reach the deepest points in each of the five oceans, Victor Vescovo (above) became the person who has dived the deepest in human history. He was aboard a Triton submarine specially built for the cause, one that—unlike some previous ­specialty subs—could be used like the space shuttle, going down and up and back down again to explore. “It opens up a whole other level,” says Craig Barnett, sales-and-marketing manager for Triton. “That sub could dive every day for as long as we had supplies, provisions and a weather window.” And with the Five Deeps Expedition scheduled to conclude this year, the sub is already on the brokerage market, ready for a new owner to take possession as early as ­September. The asking price, Barnett says, is $48.9 million, which includes the 223-foot ­research vessel the sub loads onto for transport. Meanwhile, Triton is using its R&D; knowledge from the project to inform new models. “We made some major breakthroughs,” ­Barnett says, “and that will affect ­everything we do in the future.”


“It’s such a big and growing sector,” Barnett says. Today’s yachtsmen “want to do the Northwest Passage, go to remote areas in the ice, have exploration and adventure, and with that desire for unique experiences comes the submersibles.”

As consumer demand for private subs has grown, so has the variety of subs available and the options for designing and outfitting them. U-Boat Worx offers 20 models within five series, while Triton offers nearly a dozen models within three series. Both ­companies have lighter-weight models designed specifically for crane loading on and off superyachts or support vessels.

The market for yacht-ready submarines has become large enough—and been around long enough—that subs can now be found on the brokerage market. Broker Chris Collins at Ocean Independence is promoting a 2018 Triton 1650/3 in Vero Beach, Florida, at an asking price of $3.3 million.
The market for yacht-ready submarines has become large enough—and been around long enough—that subs can now be found on the brokerage market. Broker Chris Collins at Ocean Independence is promoting a 2018 Triton 1650/3 in Vero Beach, Florida, at an asking price of $3.3 million. (Courtesy Ocean Independence/)

And while yacht owners a decade ago thought of a personal sub as a utilitarian toy that came off a production line, today’s owners are thinking about them more in the ways they think about custom-built tenders.

“You want a continuity of experience between the yacht and the submersible,” Barnett says. “We can of course paint the exterior any color you want, and now we can work with the interior designer of your yacht. If you want white, carbon fiber and sporty, we can do that. If you want wood and classic with matching leathers, we can do it that way. It’s the same as with outfitting a luxury tender.”

Costs for anything customized of course come in a range, and the same is true of today’s ­submarines. Triton’s entry-level model goes for $2.7 million, while its largest sub—a seven-seater—retails for $5.25 million.

Triton’s 1650/3LP is for superyachts. It can take three people down 1,650 feet and has a crane weight of 8,800 pounds.
Triton’s 1650/3LP is for superyachts. It can take three people down 1,650 feet and has a crane weight of 8,800 pounds. (Courtesy Ocean Independence/)

Barnett says yacht owners see those prices as being in line with, say, a customized helicopter that lands on the bow.

In fact, he says, the way subs are discussed aboard yachts could soon rival the way owners talk about their onboard choppers: “I can see submersibles potentially becoming as popular on yachts as helicopters. Maybe not every yacht has one, but every yacht gets built with the capability to have one on board. You would order your ­helicopter, and then order your submarine.”


Marketed as “the ultimate sports submarine,” the HiPer Sub from U-Boat Worx can ­reportedly cruise underwater at 6 knots and perform what the manufacturer calls “hydrobatics,” meaning rolls, loops, steep turns, and vertical ascents and descents. It holds four people (including the pilot) and can dive to 984 feet. According to U-Boat Worx, the joystick control gives skippers the feeling of operating a fighter jet underwater.
Marketed as “the ultimate sports submarine,” the HiPer Sub from U-Boat Worx can ­reportedly cruise underwater at 6 knots and perform what the manufacturer calls “hydrobatics,” meaning rolls, loops, steep turns, and vertical ascents and descents. It holds four people (including the pilot) and can dive to 984 feet. According to U-Boat Worx, the joystick control gives skippers the feeling of operating a fighter jet underwater. (U-Boat Worx/)The Super Yacht Sub from U-Boat Worx is designed for yacht owners. It can hold three people (including the pilot) and dive to 984 feet. It moves underwater at 3 knots, according to the manufacturer. Inside, there’s air conditioning, a Bluetooth sound system and a cold-stowage box for chilling drinks. The sub’s weight is just over 8,375 pounds, with the design intended to be compact enough for superyacht cranes and stowage.
The Super Yacht Sub from U-Boat Worx is designed for yacht owners. It can hold three people (including the pilot) and dive to 984 feet. It moves underwater at 3 knots, according to the manufacturer. Inside, there’s air conditioning, a Bluetooth sound system and a cold-stowage box for chilling drinks. The sub’s weight is just over 8,375 pounds, with the design intended to be compact enough for superyacht cranes and stowage. (U-Boat Worx/)Designed as a collaboration ­between Triton and Aston Martin, Project Neptune is a limited-edition submarine that reportedly will be able to dive to 1,640 feet with three people (including the pilot) on board. The “sprint speed” is expected to top 5 knots, with acceleration being four times as fast as Triton’s flagship model. Custom interiors will be handled in partnership with Q by Aston Martin, known for personalizing sports cars.
Designed as a collaboration ­between Triton and Aston Martin, Project Neptune is a limited-edition submarine that reportedly will be able to dive to 1,640 feet with three people (including the pilot) on board. The “sprint speed” is expected to top 5 knots, with acceleration being four times as fast as Triton’s flagship model. Custom interiors will be handled in partnership with Q by Aston Martin, known for personalizing sports cars. (Courtesy Triton Subs/)Triton’s 1650/7 Configurable can be arranged with five or seven seats. The interior volume is more spacious than Triton’s flagship model, thanks to a wider beam of 11 feet, 8 inches. The weight of this sub is 23,100 pounds, making her a candidate not for most yacht decks or holds, but instead for the increasingly popular support vessels that have enough deck space to carry sizable cranes as well as the ­submarine and sports tenders.
Triton’s 1650/7 Configurable can be arranged with five or seven seats. The interior volume is more spacious than Triton’s flagship model, thanks to a wider beam of 11 feet, 8 inches. The weight of this sub is 23,100 pounds, making her a candidate not for most yacht decks or holds, but instead for the increasingly popular support vessels that have enough deck space to carry sizable cranes as well as the ­submarine and sports tenders. (Courtesy Triton Subs/)

The Rise of Submarines Aboard Yachts

2008
J.D. Ducanes, captain of the 164-foot Trinity Mine Games, trains on a Triton 1000/2 (carrying two ­people to 1,000 feet). It becomes the first private submarine available to guests aboard a charter yacht.

2012
Triton receives an order to build its third 3300/3 (carrying three people to 3,300 feet) for use on a superyacht, within a few months of the first 3300/3 doing its maiden dive off Grand Bahama.

2019
With explorer yachts surging in popularity, Dutch yacht builder Oceanco unveils a 345-foot concept design with room for not one, but two submarines, along with a helicopter and a land vehicle.

DutchCraft 56 Makes World Debut

The reverse rake of the DutchCraft 56's house and windshield helps reduce heat build up from the sun; eliminate unwanted reflections when operating in low light; and see better in foul weather.
The reverse rake of the DutchCraft 56's house and windshield helps reduce heat build up from the sun; eliminate unwanted reflections when operating in low light; and see better in foul weather. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

DutchCraft, a sister company to Zeelander, hosted the world premiere of the DutchCraft 56 at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

The DutchCraft 56 is available in open and cabin versions, and can seat as many as 40 people for parties at the dock. Overnight accommodations are for eight people, and while cruising, the yacht can take 12 guests.

“The DC56 is the Swiss Army knife of boats,” Floris Koopmans, marketing coordinator at DutchCraft, stated in a press release. “Want to take your guests on a diving or fishing expedition? It has you covered with ample space for kit storage right by the water, and four comfortable cabins for accommodation. Have a special event you want to celebrate with 40 friends? Bring on the DJ and dance floor, with three levels of social space and an enormous aft deck. Feel the need for speed with some fun inflatables or Jet Skis? There is so much room to store them all.”

The DutchCraft 56 comes in open and cabin versions.
The DutchCraft 56 comes in open and cabin versions. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

Engine options include Volvo Penta IPS units as well as Doen jets or John Deere power plants. With Volvo Penta IPS950s, maximum speed is reportedly 40 knots with a range of 700 nautical miles at 7 knots.

How is the DutchCraft 56 built? With glass fiber, vinylester resin, sandwich construction and a PVC core.

For more information, visit: dutchcraft.com

Quick Specs:
Length Overall: 56'
Maximum Beam: 16'7"
Draft: 3'5" w/IPS; 2'5" w/ Doen waterjets
Fuel Cap.: 793 gal.
Freshwater Cap.: 225 gal.
Engines: 2/Volvo Penta IPS650 or IPS900 diesels: 2/John Deere diesels available with Doen waterjets
Top Speed: 40 knots
Max Range: 840 NM at 7 knots (Volvo Penta IPS600s); 700 NM at 7 knots (Volvo Penta IPS950s)

Team Italia's High-Tech Helm

Full yacht-systems integration, 4K displays and augmented reality are all part of i-Bridge VBS.
Full yacht-systems integration, 4K displays and augmented reality are all part of i-Bridge VBS. (Courtesy Team Italia/)

One of the coolest aspects of covering electronics for Yachting has been the opportunity to witness the ever-increasing levels of technological integration that have revolutionized yacht operations. Team Italia, through its i-Bridge installations, has become a leader in technological integration.

That lead now widens with the Panorama Virtualized Bridge Solution. This integrated-helm setup has a user-friendly interface that amplifies an operator’s situational awareness, all in a sleek package that combines the technologies of augmented reality, automation, networking, digital switching, power management and global connectivity.

In regards to hardware and software, Team Italia’s eye-pleasing and highly customizable Panorama VBS includes a main user-interface terminal; numerous video-monitoring screens and touch screens; and a bespoke, Linux-based ­operating system, as well as scalable levels of built-in redundancy. The system can include side workstations—“wings,” in Team Italia’s parlance—for tasks such as running the vessel’s electronic chart display and information system, radar or forward-looking sonar. The user-interface terminal includes joggers, tracker balls, rotary knobs and (installation depending) hard keys.

A user’s eyes are likely to be riveted to the system’s touchscreen displays: A 4K stretch screen displays augmented-reality imagery, while LED monitors display real-time video footage from the yacht’s abovedecks-mounted cameras. The screens are typically fitted forward and athwartships of the user-­interface terminal, and the Panorama VBS can be built into the yacht’s dash or can reside on Team Italia-crafted tables. It all depends on the yacht owner’s desired setup.

While the Panorama VBS is visually stunning, its magic resides behind its touchscreen displays, where the various technologies combine.

“The Panorama VBS uses a heterogeneous system architecture and embedded electronic solutions, with fully redundant central-processing units based on watchdog technology,” says Daniele Ceccanti, Team Italia’s technical director. The “watchdog” technologies monitor and report failures, and can restart applications or reboot the system. “The operating system uses suitably ­configured Linux solutions, real-time operating systems and customized solutions. Some parts are based on Windows Embedded or Internet of Things architecture.”

The Panorama VBS also has Swiss-Army-knifelike networking capabilities, including NMEA 0183, NMEA 2000, J1939, CAN bus and RS232 ports. Ceccanti says the company develops additional interface protocols and bespoke hardware solutions as projects dictate.

The result is an ergonomically ­comfortable helm with a state-of-the-art nav system, a full ship’s library (including ­technical documentation) and built-in power management, plus the processing ­power necessary to run a sophisticated yacht from a bank of screens. The system also communicates with people and clouds by way of its Boat Connection Manager, allowing users to manage the vessel’s cellular, Wi-Fi and satellite-communication connections.

“The Panorama VBS can be fully scaled up or down, so it can be fitted aboard middle-sized yachts or on mega- and gigayachts,” Ceccanti says, adding that it’s equally adept aboard custom and semicustom builds.

As with some contemporary automobiles, the Panorama VBS includes operating modes that help owners and captains better perform onboard tasks, such as going through a pre-cruise checklist.

“The operator can choose among the various use profiles,” Ceccanti says. “This means that the tools needed for every specific type of navigation are always readily available.”

The ­augmented-reality features help to simplify tasks such as anchoring. Here, the system employs topsides-mounted video cameras to present, on the system’s LED screens, a graphically augmented rendering of the anchor lowering, as well as information such as real-time depth and the amount of anchor rode that’s been released. The number of installed cameras depends on a vessel’s length overall, with the cameras strategically fitted to deliver panoramic views.

While the Panorama VBS is intuitive and user-friendly, Team Italia says captains need four to eight hours of training. And, the company’s­ ­technical director says, “The Team ­Italia technical staff is always ­available for further training or to help facilitate customer-requested customization options.”
While the Panorama VBS is intuitive and user-friendly, Team Italia says captains need four to eight hours of training. And, the company’s­ ­technical director says, “The Team ­Italia technical staff is always ­available for further training or to help facilitate customer-requested customization options.” (Courtesy Team Italia/)

“The Panorama VBS augmented-reality system gives the captain a full view of the environment around the yacht from the bridge,” Ceccanti says. “Through this type of display, which is graphically overlaid with navigation data, the captain can easily manage steering operations from the bridge.”

Ceccanti sees the system’s ability to deliver panoramic views around the yacht as its biggest innovation, however, he also points to the system’s heads-up displays (HUD) as useful tools for negotiating the marine environment. Unlike augmented reality, which overlays data onto video imagery, HUDs present data on transparent screens.

“The HUD allows users to overlap the main navigational information such as course, waypoint, AIS and radar targets with the actual view while sailing,” he says.

Just like the systems aboard modern, fly-by-wire jetliners, the Panorama VBS allows an operator to control all systems and instrumentation via a few screen taps, while other tasks happen automatically.

“The Panorama VBS has its own automation, monitoring and power-management systems, which are perfectly integrated with the system’s navigation and steering functions,” Ceccanti says. Third-party control systems also can be integrated.

Factor in the Panorama VBS’s ability to plan routes and view cartography that’s overlaid with AIS and radar data, as well as the system’s stunning graphics and intuitive user interface, and it’s easy to understand why Team Italia continues to be seen as a leader in the integration of systems.

Of course, as with any impressive technology, it’s important to remember that what’s at the helm is only a tool of safe navigation. It’s critical that operators maintain their comfort and familiarity piloting their vessels the old-fashioned way, perchance calamity strikes.

But for anyone who is considering a new build or refit with a deep dive into onboard integration and helm-side situational awareness, Team Italia’s Panorama VBS could be worth serious consideration.

Reviewed: Zeelander Z72

The Zeelander Z72’s profile is reminiscent of commuter yachts from the era of The Great Gatsby.
The Zeelander Z72’s profile is reminiscent of commuter yachts from the era of The Great Gatsby. (Jeff Brown/)

You can spot a Zeelander's profile from afar, particularly because of its high bow and signature raked and rounded transom. Essentially, Zeelanders are modern commuter yachts with a retro twist. Credit for the styling goes to Dutch designer Cor D. Rover. His first Zeelander, the Z44, launched in 2008 and that model has since been joined by the Z55, and now the Z72.

I got aboard Hull No. 1 of the new flagship along the river Maas in the Netherlands, where Zeelanders are built. The river runs across the top of the Port of Rotterdam, from whence this Z72 will ship to Massachusetts to replace her owner’s previous Z55 at his summer home on Nantucket. She will winter in the Bahamas.

Stepping into the cockpit, I first saw the Z72’s bar, which is a work of art. What my eye initially registered as high-gloss woodwork, wasn’t. It was a paint job that created a faux grain for the bar, barstool backs and window frame. The same treatment is given to the aft deck’s table, the radome, the windshield surround and the cap rails, where the effect is like a zebrano wood on steroids.

The tender garage is amidships and fits a Williams Turbojet 325 and a personal watercraft.
The tender garage is amidships and fits a Williams Turbojet 325 and a personal watercraft. (Jeff Brown/)

The window at the afterdeck bar drops down to connect the space with the galley aft, beyond which are booth seating and the helm station in the salon. The helm has three seats with reversible backs. Visibility is uninterrupted. Light and bright are often overused terms in our business, but not in this case. There is really very little structure to obscure a nearly 360-degree view. I’d go so far as to say this yacht has some of the cleanest sightlines I can remember. The windshield is a simply whopping piece of curved glass from U.S.-based ProCurve at roughly 10 feet, 8 inches wide and 3 feet, 6 inches high.

The owner of this Z72 selected dark leather tiles for the sole throughout the lower deck—an interesting choice. I liked them for their natural patination, which should improve with age and wear, and because they’re softer and a little warmer underfoot than a hard laminate.

Being a boutique builder, Zeelander offers several lower-deck configurations on the Z72. This first hull has three en suite staterooms, with the owner’s stateroom forward. There’s at least 6 feet of space between the master’s door and the berth, with square-shaped hull windows on either side, creating an open feeling.

The Z72 that we got aboard had a three-stateroom layout with the master forward.
The Z72 that we got aboard had a three-stateroom layout with the master forward. (Jeff Brown/)

This owner configured the crew cabin with a single berth; it also can come with twins. Accessed via an afterdeck hatch, the crew space is finished to a similar standard as the guest staterooms, including having a rain shower in the head.

The Z72 is not just stylish. She offers brisk performance. Standard engines are triple 725 hp Volvo Penta IPS950s, which should deliver 28 to 29 knots at top hop, according to Zeelander. Hull No. 1 has the biggest engine combination available: triple 1,000 hp Volvo Penta IPS1350s with Q7 props and Active Ride Control trim tabs. The wing pods steer with the middle pod is fixed.

At just under half-load, this Z72 was on plane in a little more than 10 seconds. In about 30 seconds, she whisked along at a hair over 42 knots with the diesels spinning at their maximum 2,370 rpm. She delivered a 40-knot average from reciprocal headings along a reasonably fast-flowing waterway.

With a few ticks on the options sheet, the Z72’s bathing ­platform can be transformed into a mini Nikki Beach. The Z72 has a length overall of 66 feet, but with the platform folded down, the yacht hits 72 feet length overall.
With a few ticks on the options sheet, the Z72’s bathing ­platform can be transformed into a mini Nikki Beach. The Z72 has a length overall of 66 feet, but with the platform folded down, the yacht hits 72 feet length overall. (Jeff Brown/)

In proper cruising mode with full tanks and throttled back to 10 knots (600 to 650 rpm), the Z72 could cover more than 1,800 nautical miles before heading for the fuel pumps, and that’s allowing for a 10 percent reserve. At 35 knots, owners could manage about 450 nautical miles, which means just over 13 hours, or a full day’s fast cruise. Most are likely to want something in between.

Whereas a Dutch contract-molding specialist laminates smaller Zeelander models, an Estonian contractor produced the Z72’s hull and superstructure. Both sections are infused using vinylester resin and closed-cell foams, and then post-cured at 140 degrees Fahrenheit for four days. The construction felt solid and relatively quiet on the water. My sound meter registered a little more than 77 decibels at the helm at her top speed; 65 decibels is the level of normal conversation.

The Z72’s tender garage is an unusual feature for a yacht of this size, and its transverse configuration is noteworthy. The garage is amidships with a lift-up door to starboard and large enough to accommodate a Williams Turbojet 325 plus a smaller personal watercraft or a rack of Seabobs. There’s a watertight crawl-through door from the tender garage to the engine room, with main engine-room access from a cockpit hatch that lifts up.

The three helm seats each have a reversible back to face guests at the dining table.
The three helm seats each have a reversible back to face guests at the dining table. (Jeff Brown/)

Beyond the IPS engines, other notable options aboard this yacht include metallic paint, a Quick gyrostabilizer, Volvo Penta’s Dynamic Positioning System, a five-year factory warranty on the engines, and various TracPhone and Vision Marine equipment. The sun pad aft can be swapped for a hot tub.

The ability to design a yacht with a retro aesthetic that could have wide appeal, and the use of a thoroughly modern build process, is no small combination. Zeelander has achieved it in the Z72. Her style should stand the test of time.

Take the next step: zeelander.com

5 Brokerage Yachts to Watch for Burgess in Monaco

<em>Inception</em>,164-foot Heesen, is on the market for $29.5 million.
Inception,164-foot Heesen, is on the market for $29.5 million. (Courtesy Burgess Yachts/)

Burgess has announced the first five yachts that it plans to display for sale at the Monaco Yacht Show in late September.

The largest is the 270-foot Abeking & Rasmussen Secret, a 2013 build with an asking price of about $130 million. She has a cruising speed of 14 knots and a range of 5,000 nautical miles.

Also expected to be on display is the 238-foot Turquoise Honor, a 2012 build with an asking price of about $53 million; the 170-foot Oceanco Lazy Z, a 1997 build listed at $15.9 million; the 164-foot Heesen Inception, a 2008 build being offered at $29.5 million; and the 122-foot Vitters Ghost, a 2005 build whose asking price is about $8.7 million.

The 122-foot <em>Ghost</em> is on the market for $8.75 million.
The 122-foot Ghost is on the market for $8.75 million. (Courtesy Burgess Yachts/)The 238-foot Turquoise-built <em>Honor</em> is for sale. Asking price: $53 million.
The 238-foot Turquoise-built Honor is for sale. Asking price: $53 million. (Courtesy Burgess Yachts/)<em>Lazy</em>, 170-foot Oceanco, is listed at $15.9 million.
Lazy, 170-foot Oceanco, is listed at $15.9 million. (Courtesy Burgess Yachts/)

Where will the Burgess stand be at the Monaco Yacht Show? QH17, Quai de l'Hirondelle

Take the next step: burgessyachts.com

348-Foot Lürssen Listed for Sale

Twin 8,600 hp MTU V20 diesels give the 348-foot <em>Amadea</em> a 13-knot cruise speed. Top-end speed: 20 knots.
Twin 8,600 hp MTU V20 diesels give the 348-foot Amadea a 13-knot cruise speed. Top-end speed: 20 knots. (Courtesy Imperial Yachts/)

Imperial Yachts, which acted as the owner's representative during construction of the 348-foot Lürssen Amadea, has now listed the 2016 build for sale.

The price is available on request.

Amadea is expected to be on display for the first time at the Monaco Yacht Show in late September. She is a six-deck yacht built to the Passenger Yacht Code, which means she can accommodate 22 guests for cruising and 16 overnight guests in eight staterooms.

Exteriors are by Espen Øino, and interiors are by Francois Zuretti.

Heading to the Monaco Yacht Show? Look for Amadea at Quai Rainier III, berth D02.

Take the next step: imperial-yachts.com

Gill’s New Waterproof Bags

Gill's new waterproof, puncture-resistant, stitch-free bags come in several colors and two sizes called Max (about 24 gallons) and Mini (about 3 gallons).
Gill's new waterproof, puncture-resistant, stitch-free bags come in several colors and two sizes called Max (about 24 gallons) and Mini (about 3 gallons). (Gill Marine/)

Gill has introduced two new sizes of its original 30-liter Race Team Bag. The Race Team Bag Max is a 90-liter (almost 24-gallon) design, while the Race Team Bag Mini is a 10-liter (just shy of 3-gallon) design.

Made of PVC-free, puncture-resistant, waterproof tarpaulin fabric, the bags are stitch-free with welded seams. Velcro fasteners hold a roll-down closure to create a watertight seal.

The Race Team Bag Max comes in graphite, while the Mini version comes in graphite, tango or blue.

Are these duffel bags? Kind of. Each bag has a padded shoulder strap, but it also has reinforced haul handles at each end.

For more information, visit: gillmarine.com

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