Victory Yacht Sales

News & Events

Charter this Azimut in New England

The 105-foot Azimut <i>Amanecer</i> has dates open for bookings in New England with a weekly base rate of $70,000.
The 105-foot Azimut Amanecer has dates open for bookings in New England with a weekly base rate of $70,000. (Courtesy Superyacht Sales and Charter/)

Superyacht Sales and Charter has welcomed the 105-foot Azimut Amanecer to the charter fleet, with dates open this summer for bookings in New England.

Inquiries are also being accepted now for charters during winter 2020-21 in the Bahamas.

Amanecer is a 2009 build that most recently was refitted in 2015. She accommodates eight to 10 guests in four staterooms.

Water toys and tenders include a 32-foot Intrepid with twin 300-horsepower outboards, a Sea-Doo, five Seabobs, water skis and wakeboards, tow toys, a trio of standup paddleboards, fishing and snorkeling gear, and two drones for taking keepsake photos and videos.

What’s the lowest weekly base rate to book Amanecer? It’s $70,000.

For more information, visit: superyachtsalesandcharter.com

An Eco-friendly Tender

Note the hinged bow door that lets guests step in and out of the tender at the beach, as opposed to climbing over the gunwales.
Note the hinged bow door that lets guests step in and out of the tender at the beach, as opposed to climbing over the gunwales. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

At the cannes yachting festival this past fall, DutchCraft—a sister company to Zeelander—unveiled the DC56. It was not your typical 56-footer. Built to seat as many as 44 people, it also could be loaded up with tons of gear, set up for a party with a DJ platform or turned into a fish-stalking machine with a fighting chair. And it had a maximum speed of 40 knots.

Now comes the second model from DutchCraft, the DC25, a superyacht tender that shows an equal amount of innovative thinking in design.

The DC25, which premiered in January at the boat show in Düsseldorf, Germany, has a length overall of 26 feet, 3 inches. It’s built of carbon fiber and has fully electric propulsion, with the ability to cruise silently at 32 knots for 75 minutes, or to cruise at 6 knots for six hours, according to the builder.

“We believe electric propulsion will be key in a future that cares about ocean preservation,” Floris Koopmans, DutchCraft’s sales and marketing manager, stated in a press release. “We are committed to investing in this positive movement, and the technology that we have developed for the DC25 is a step in the right direction.”

The low position and compact size of the drivetrain is what gives the boat so much extra space on deck. There’s a center console forward for the skipper, with rails abaft it that allow elements to be swapped out. At right, you can see how the DC25 looks with padded bench seating on the rails. More seats can be added to fit as many as 12 guests, or the seats can slide away to make room for, say, a rack holding eight sets of scuba-diving gear or piles of luggage heading to and from shore. Or the deck space can be left open to house a pair of personal watercraft, all kinds of gear or, perhaps, an ATV.

The DC25 has a 1-foot-4-inch draft that makes it useful as a near-shore tender because it can wiggle through the shallows.
The DC25 has a 1-foot-4-inch draft that makes it useful as a near-shore tender because it can wiggle through the shallows. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

The center console is shaded by a hardtop that pivots toward the bow, a design element that DutchCraft says will make stowage easier in a superyacht tender garage. And the height of the hardtop can drop from 11 feet to 6 feet, 4 inches when it’s time to put the tender away for the night. Beam on the boat is 7 feet, 8 inches.

“There is nothing else like it in the size category,” Koopmans says. “The sheer capacity and range of uses [are] phenomenal.”

The DC25 can be used as a family dayboat, or it can be a crew-ready shuttle for

handling groceries and garbage. The boat’s batteries can even be used as an auxiliary power supply for a superyacht at anchor or in port.

The design brief on the DC25 called for giving yacht owners “the flexibility and fun they desire from life on the water, backed up by robust and practical design.” For a Dutch brand looking to establish its bona fides primarily on the ideas of versatility and practicality, the DC25 is a smart follow-up launch as the sistership to the DC56.

Far-Flung Charter

<i>Imagine</i> is a 1993 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She has circumnavigated the world three times already.
Imagine is a 1993 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She has circumnavigated the world three times already. (Camper & Nicholsons International/)

Capt. Riccardo del Prete is excited, even though he isn’t exactly sure about what’s going to happen next.

He’s the captain aboard Imagine, a 110-foot Alloy whose owners are planning to sail around the world and make the boat available to charter guests along the way. The loose plan is for Imagine to leave the Caribbean and head toward Panama about the time you read this, and then spend time in Belize and the Galapagos Islands before crossing the Pacific Ocean. From there, she’ll head toward the Tuamotus, Marquesas and Society Islands for summer 2020, and she’ll be in her birthplace of New Zealand for the America’s Cup in March 2021. Next will be the Mediterranean, and after that, who knows?

“Our idea is to have the program and then see what the clients want to do,” del Prete says. “We can spend more time in the east or the west coast of Panama, or move to Costa Rica or to Belize. These are all beautiful places, and it will be interesting to see which inquiries come in.”

The round-the-world charter opportunities are the byproduct of the owner’s desire to cruise the world’s more remote locations. And because he wants to cruise farther afield than charter yachts usually go, clients also will have the opportunity to book in regions that typically aren’t offered by boats of any kind.

The Society Islands, which include Tahiti and Bora Bora, are on Imagine’s upcoming itinerary.
The Society Islands, which include Tahiti and Bora Bora, are on Imagine’s upcoming itinerary. (iStock/Bomboman/)

Imagine is precisely the right boat for that ambitious style of chartering, says Nicole Terry, who manages the yacht’s charter program with Camper & Nicholsons International.

“She has circumnavigated three times in her life and is a proven oceangoing, world-cruising sailing yacht,” Terry says. “She has also completed numerous Atlantic crossings and competed in many regattas. Imagine proudly bears one of the most sought-after design and build pedigrees of the sailing-yacht world: She hails from the drawing boards of the award-winning Dubois studio and was built by New Zealand’s Alloy Yachts in 1993.”

That pedigree, along with her 2018 refit, means Imagine’s appearance as a spectator yacht at the America’s Cup will be a homecoming for a local girl who sailed into the world and made good. The Cup will be raced in Auckland, on the same waters where Imagine did her shakedown runs after launching.

“It is quite poetic that she will be there and available to charter for the event,” Terry says, adding that the weekly base rate will be $79,000 during the Cup. “At this stage, we are open to any plans our clients might have. We are already getting a lot of interest for this period, and everyone is very excited already to be there—the crew and captain included.”

In the Society Islands, charter clients can go ashore to watch traditional celebrations.
In the Society Islands, charter clients can go ashore to watch traditional celebrations. (iStock/Arayuth3390/)

The yacht has three staterooms and can charter with as many as seven guests in a few configurations. There’s a full-beam master with an adjoining children’s corner for two youngsters. One of the guest staterooms has a double berth, and the other has three singles. The layout makes her an option for a family with children or for a group of adults.

“The other major element is that Imagine is a true yachtsman’s yacht,” Terry says. “Capt. Riccardo loves to get sailing enthusiasts young and old involved in the plotting of the route and the sailing of the yacht where he can. Sailing lessons, cooking lessons, yoga lessons, fishing—this is a crew that love to get the guests involved and are happy to share their passion. I think this is great for groups of adults who want to learn or are already sailors—and truly wonderful for children, to inspire them and educate them about the ocean, winds and stars.”

Del Prete says he puts a premium on guest comfort even in remote destinations, a skill set that will be needed for charter clients who want to book in archipelagos where the boat may be the only place around with provisions, air conditioning and first-aid gear.

“We have a very high standard of comfort on board, even in remote places,” he says. “We can tailor the program for guests who want more or less adventure. Some people just want to be on the beaches, but others want all kinds of scuba diving. We can do both.”

New Zealand is Imagine’s birthplace, and it’s where she’ll be chartering in early 2021 for the America’s Cup in Auckland.
New Zealand is Imagine’s birthplace, and it’s where she’ll be chartering in early 2021 for the America’s Cup in Auckland. (iStock/Daniel Thomson/)

Terry says her team at Camper & Nicholsons can work with clients who want to book just one week or who want to book several weeks aboard in different destinations, flying back and forth to the yacht to meet up with del Prete and the crew as they make their way around the world.

“We are certainly seeing more interest from clients in further-flung places,” Terry says. “The Med will always be a strong cruising ground, but more and more clients are interested in venturing to places as extreme as Antarctica. This is also evident in the fact that the owners too are keen to venture there themselves and share these wonderful destinations with family and friends on their yacht. Imagine isn’t heading to Antarctica just yet, but you never know.”

For del Prete, simply planning the upcoming circumnavigation has been an adventure. He’s thinking about the places that he will be seeing for the first time and about the leeway the owners are allowing to truly explore them.

“We will have plenty of time,” he says. “We do not want to be rushed. We can go and go without touching any port. It’s very exciting.”

Take the next step: camperandnicholsons.com

Reviewed: Galeon Yachts 680 Fly

Foredeck sun pads retract and tables rise electrically to form alfresco dining space.
Foredeck sun pads retract and tables rise electrically to form alfresco dining space. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

There are two ways to absorb what Poland’s Galeon Yachts has achieved with the 680 Fly: one is to look at a photograph and the other is to stand in the salon.

When I first looked at the image of the 680 Fly, taken at dusk with all of the yacht’s lights on, I was startled. It seemed as though the yacht glowed, with light pouring from multiple windows on all decks.

Later, standing in the salon, I was surrounded by windows that drop down electrically, just as in a car. Want to feel the breeze and smell the sea air? Push a button. As Bob Burke, brand manager for Galeon importer MarineMax, says, “It feels like a giant dayboat.”

That sense of openness is a noteworthy achievement aboard a 68-foot vessel. The 680 Fly is indeed Galeon’s largest Fly model. The only bigger boats that Galeon builds are the 700 Skydeck and 780 Crystal. The 680 Fly is a fourth-generation design for the builder, which has learned to maximize not only the feeling of space but also creature comforts on board.

One of the best examples of Galeon opening up the interior is next to the helm seat: a door to the side deck floats in a one-piece, sole-to-ceiling glass window. The whole interior concept takes cues from waves, with rounded design elements in the fiberglass and woodwork.

The salon’s dining table to port stretches 7 feet, 1 inch, creating family-size eating space. A couch on the opposite side adds to the comfort quotient.

The Galeon 680 Fly’s full-beam master stateroom has private access from the salon. That’s a king-size berth.
The Galeon 680 Fly’s full-beam master stateroom has private access from the salon. That’s a king-size berth. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

Aft, the U-shaped galley keeps the chef out of any traffic flow. An island counter is sized for a buffet. Don’t expect the chef to get anything done quickly, though; the window over the counter is mightily distracting. Opposite the galley is a choice of arrangements, with a pair of seats and a table for snacks tied in popularity with a pair of bar stools and a countertop.

Forward, for the skipper and a companion, are high-backed pedestal seats with footrests. They’re abaft a dashboard with twin Raymarine multifunction displays and Boening monitors for the engines. Galeon’s Integrated Management Information System reads on the MFDs, and the Empire digital-switching system handles a multitude of functions. The throttle and shifters are on a pedestal, as are the bow- and stern-thruster joysticks. Overhead, a sliding sunroof adjusts to the skipper’s vitamin-D requirements.

The full-beam master stateroom is accessed via private stairs from the salon. There’s a king berth on centerline. Hanging lockers are on each side, while a settee is to starboard and a desk with tidy partitions is to port. The head is aft in a compartment distinct from the shower and vanity.

This stateroom is quiet. While the 680 Fly ran at 24 knots, my sound meter barely registered 70 dB(A), which is about the level of normal conversation.

Stairs and a companionway forward of the salon lead to the guest accommodations, including the forepeak VIP. On most boats, this is the space where bed size is constricted to match the hull sides, but guests on the 680 Fly have a king-berth width (80 inches). The en suite head allots 29-by-34 inches for the shower, with a glass door.

The helmsman has quick side-deck access. Note the breakfast nook for family and friends.
The helmsman has quick side-deck access. Note the breakfast nook for family and friends. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

Just abaft the VIP are a pair of guest staterooms, each with twin berths that convert to doubles. These staterooms share a head that also serves as the yacht’s day-head.

Back in the cockpit and just steps from the galley, a settee is wrapped around a teak table in the shade of the flybridge overhang. There’s a pull-down shade and wind block abaft the settee.

Teak steps lead to the flybridge, whose beam extends over the side decks aft, allowing room for a C-shaped dinette that seats 15. Just forward is a U-shaped bar with a fridge, ice maker, sink, grill and bottle stowage.

The flybridge helm virtually duplicates the lower helm, adding a settee to port and a sun pad stretching to the venturi windscreen. The hardtop has an opening sunroof. To keep the 680 Fly’s center of gravity low, the entire superstructure including the hardtop is made of carbon fiber, removing thousands of pounds of weight over fiberglass layups.

The foredeck is also designed with guest relaxation in mind. Here, the sun pad has a pair of tables that pop up electrically, turning the area into twin dining tables surrounded by four couches.

Dual purpose: The flybridge overhang adds real estate up top, and shades the cockpit dining space.
Dual purpose: The flybridge overhang adds real estate up top, and shades the cockpit dining space. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

MarineMax, which imports the 680 Fly, upgrades the standard 1,000 MAN diesels to 1,200 hp versions. We hit 32 knots with a 125 gph fuel burn, resulting in a 236-nautical-mile range. At a 28-knot cruise, fuel burn was 110.8 gph, providing a 247-nautical-mile range. At a leisurely 20-knot cruise speed, fuel burn is 68 gph and range climbs to 271 nautical miles. The Tony Castro-designed hull is slippery, coming up fast and flat onto plane without needing the Humphree Interceptor trim tabs to push the bow down. Handling is light and nimble—and assured.

With a multitasking layout, accommodations for a family and then some, admirable performance, and clever flourishes (such as transforming side decks), the Galeon 680 Fly is a new style of cruising yacht for a new generation of cruisers.


Take the next step: galeonyachts.us

Tankoa’s S501 in Final Construction Phase

Tankoa Yachts in Italy is beginning final construction on the 164-foot S501. The yacht is a sistership to <i>Bintador</i> and <i>Vertige</i>, with design by Francesco Paszkowski.
Tankoa Yachts in Italy is beginning final construction on the 164-foot S501. The yacht is a sistership to Bintador and Vertige, with design by Francesco Paszkowski. (Courtesy Tankoa/)

Tankoa Yachts in Italy has resumed work on the 164-foot S501, which is now beginning final construction with crews returning to work from the Covid-19 shutdown.

S501 was started on spec and purchased in March, just before the pandemic struck in Europe. The yacht is a sistership to Bintador and Vertige, with design by Francesco Paszkowski.

The layout on S501 is similar to that of her sisterships, however, the main deck aft is entirely a lounge (the dining room is on the upper deck) and the master stateroom forward has a lounge that converts to an en suite stateroom.

“Although we were effectively obliged to stop work for two months, production is now back on track,” Giuseppe Mazza, Tankoa’s sales manager, stated in a press release. “With construction at more than 75 percent complete, we’re making up for lost time and looking at delivery by the end of the year to allow the owner to use it in the Caribbean”

The yacht’s paint scheme is expected to include a black hull with a metallic gray superstructure. Interior design is by Casadio Miami in the United States.

What is S501’s projected speed? 14 knots at cruise with a 17.5-knot top end, according to Tankoa.

For more information, visit: tankoa.it

Turquoise Yachts Launches 183-Footer

The 183-foot explorer yacht "Blue II" is classified as ice class 1B, meaning she can explore the polar regions and the Northwest Passage.
The 183-foot explorer yacht "Blue II" is classified as ice class 1B, meaning she can explore the polar regions and the Northwest Passage. (Courtesy Turquoise Yachts/)

Turquoise Yachts in Istanbul, Turkey, has launched the 183-foot explorer yacht Blue II. Previously known as Project Lombok, the four-deck vessel is designed by Andre Hoek and bears a resemblance to classic steamships.

Blue II is classified as ice class 1B, which means she can explore the polar regions and the Northwest Passage. She has IMO Tier III diesel-electric propulsion, as well as under-deck stowage for two tenders. Interior volume is 785 gross tons.

Hoek conceived the interiors in collaboration with Vickers Studio and Dols Home. Master Yachts Consultancy served as the owner’s representative.

The yacht cruises at about 13 knots, according to the builder, and she has at-rest stabilizers for guest comfort at anchor.

When is Blue II expected to be delivered to her owner? Early July. Commissioning is being done remotely because of Covid-19 flight restrictions.

For more information, visit: turquoiseyachts.com

Seattle Yachts International Refines the Yacht Sales Experience

Seattle Yachts International Refines the Yacht Sales Experience
Seattle Yachts International Refines the Yacht Sales Experience (Seattle Yachts International/)

Not too many years ago, when someone went shopping for a new or used boat, they would attend boat shows, scan printed listings, and establish a relationship with a local yacht broker. The broker would use available resources to help understand what the buyer was looking for and assist in finding potential boats that matched these requirements among what was available locally or within the broker’s personal network.

When it was time to sell, often the same broker would help list the boat, determine an appropriate listing price, and represent the boat to any interested buyers through the process from initial inquiry to sea trial and final sale.

The buyer/broker relationship frequently developed into friendship, often lasting years and several boats.

Then came the Internet and boat shopping became a sport, with online listings from around the world. These early MLS websites weren’t perfect but were the way of the future. Soon they became the new normal for anyone boat shopping with an Internet connection.

Unfortunately, there are two fundamental issues with most MLS websites. First is the assumption that one already knows what they think they are looking for. If one wants a sailboat or trawler in a certain size range, and is open to listings from multiple regions, who has the patience to sift through thousands of boats that come back from the search?

The other issue is the lost relationship with an experienced broker, a marine industry professional who is a far better filter than any search engine. The right broker can refine what a buyer is really looking for among the available choices. They ask the important questions. They have experience with yacht brands and know some of the issues of some boats. A broker will certainly use a MLS website as one of the available tools, but with better focus.

How About A Different Approach?

Enter Seattle Yachts International, a yacht sales and brokerage operation that is breaking the mold of the traditional yacht sales and brokerage business. Originally formed in 1983 as SAS Yachts (Sailboats at Shilshole), the company initially focused on new and used sailboats for sailors in the Puget Sound area. It changed its name to Seattle Yachts in 2009.

Another Pacific Northwest company, Northwest Yachts, began in 1992, representing a line of trawlers as well as long-range cruising yachts available in the brokerage market. Based in Anacortes, Washington, the company is located at a major jumping off point for cruising the Pacific Northwest and Alaska, making it a logical place to search for a cruising boat.

The new Northwest 63 is a true offshore expedition yacht ready for adventure.
The new Northwest 63 is a true offshore expedition yacht ready for adventure. (Seattle Yachts International/)

In 2016, the two companies merged into Seattle Yachts, bringing experienced yacht brokers into both offices to provide knowledgeable service for anyone interested in a cruising sailboat, trawler, or motoryacht. With a common denominator of knowledgeable brokers experienced in cruising solutions, the two offices built a reputation as an excellent yacht sales resource.

To expand its regional expertise to a wider range of the nation’s cruising markets, the Seattle Yachts operation has since opened Florida offices in Fort Lauderdale and Jupiter, as well as California offices in San Diego and Alameda. Seattle Yachts also has satellite offices in the San Juan Islands, St Augustine, Florida, Marina Del Rey in California, and Subic Bay in the Philippines. Another office will soon open in Tampa/St Petersburg.

What is exceptionally unique about what is now Seattle Yachts International is that the company has many decades of experience in both power and sail for anyone interested in cruising. In addition to an integrated network to support its internal brokerage business to buy and sell boats, the company also represents several premium yacht brands to satisfy a wide range of cruising and boating interests.

Seattle Yachts International offers a one-stop shopping experience with the ability to source brokerage boats from both coasts because the offices work together to assist a buyer in finding his or her dream boat wherever it is located. Each broker has the resources of a large, well-established company supporting local offices, with experts available within the organization to help guide and refine the buying or selling process, no matter where the customer is located.

Seattle Yachts recently became the Hampton and Endurance dealer for the east coast.
Seattle Yachts recently became the Hampton and Endurance dealer for the east coast. (Seattle Yachts International/)

All the Seattle Yachts’ offices represent the following quality yacht brands, as well as its full-service brokerage operation to help sell your boat or help you buy a new one:

  • Northern Marine
  • Northwest Yachts
  • Alaskan Yachts
  • Nimbus Boats
  • Regency Yachts
  • Legacy Yachts
  • Paragon Boats

In addition to the above brands, the Seattle Yachts Florida team also represents these yacht companies:

Texas to East Coast:

  • Hampton Yachts
  • Endurance Yachts

East Coast:

  • American Tug

The West Coast offices also represent:

  • Hanse Yachts
  • Dehler Yachts
  • Moody Yachts
  • Tartan Yachts

Three of these yacht brands are in-house yachts: Northern Marine, Northwest Yachts, and Alaskan Yachts. Northern Marine has a world-wide reputation for building long range expedition yachts second to none, located in Anacortes. Northwest Yachts and Alaskan Yachts are semi-custom motoryachts with a decided trawler and expedition influence. They represent the latest in contemporary yacht design capable of safely cruising anywhere.

Seattle Yachts has a new Northern Marine 57 currently in production and available for sale. There is even time to choose your color.
Seattle Yachts has a new Northern Marine 57 currently in production and available for sale. There is even time to choose your color. (Seattle Yachts International/)

Having such superb yachts within the Seattle Yachts organization means that wherever you are on the cruising boat spectrum, there is a cruising boat for you. In addition to the experienced staff of brokers, the company has boat builders, naval architects, and designers who can work with you to build your ultimate dream cruiser. Building a new yacht is a tremendous experience and working with a professional team from initial concept through to launch can be the thrill of a lifetime.

Seattle Yachts International has confidently built a nationwide network of yacht services to help with all your cruising boating needs. Brokers communicate with other offices to get answers and inquire about cruising yachts that may be available, so a buyer is assured there is a network of resources working in their interests. And because these brokers are familiar with both yachts on the brokerage market, as well as new yachts and boats in the Seattle Yachts International lineup, one can be certain the Seattle Yachts Team will help customers find the right cruising boat among the often overwhelming options and choices one finds at a large boat show.

Seattle Yachts International has a presence at all major boat shows, Trawler Fest, and many local shows near its local offices.

Buying and selling a cruising boat in today’s market has never been easier and working through the process can be an enjoyable experience. Contact your nearest Seattle Yachts office, or stop by its booth at a show, and be introduced to brokers ready and willing to take care of you. Whether you are looking to buy your first cruising boat, upgrade to the next level, or consider a new custom build with the assistance of successful boat builders, Seattle Yachts International wants to make your experience a pleasure.

It is even the company’s tagline: Our business is fun.

Furuno Connections: Product Comparison Shoot Out

This season Furuno is testing all four major boating marine electronics manufacturers side by side - something that has never been attempted in the marine electronics world. They will be comparing Multi-Function Display User Interfaces, Doppler Radar performance, Fish Finder performance, Chart Plotter functions, and even 3D Side Scanning Sonars. Furuno has made it an unbiased test by using four similar boats, each with marine electronics systems that have similar fish finding and radar sensors, updated with the latest software, and operating with the auto settings. This is the head to head marine electronics series you won’t want to miss!

Late-Model Ocean Alexander for Sale

The 90-foot, 2018 Ocean Alexander <i>Untethered</i> cruises at 12 knots with a top hop of 20 knots.
The 90-foot, 2018 Ocean Alexander Untethered cruises at 12 knots with a top hop of 20 knots. (Courtesy Denison Yachting/)

Sales broker Kurt Bosshardt at Denison Yachting has listed the 90-foot, 2018 Ocean Alexander Untethered for sale in Fort Lauderdale. The asking price is $5,590,000.

“This lightly used, 90-foot Ocean Alexander built in 2018 is in an extremely rare class,” Bosshardt stated in a press release. “No expense was spared on her factory options and owner upgrades, pushing her build cost past $8.6 million. The CAT C32 Acert engines are under a Platinum Plus warranty through August 2022. Best of all, her blue vinyl wrap is protecting a pristine matterhorn white hull.”

Untethered is showing 1,043 hours on her 1,600-horsepower engines, according to the sales broker. Her cruising speed is reportedly 12 knots with a top hop of 20 knots. Draft is 5 feet 11 inches, and she has a 3,000-gallon fuel tank.

There are four guest staterooms, two crew cabins and eight heads on board.

What are some other key features aboard Untethered? At-rest stabilizers, and hydraulic bow and stern thrusters.

For more information, visit: denisonyachting.com

C-Map Contour+ Charts Available Preloaded

Lowrance HDS Live displays will be preloaded with C-Map’s Contour+ charts offering more detail and greater lake coverage than C-Map’s US Enhanced map that previously was included.
Lowrance HDS Live displays will be preloaded with C-Map’s Contour+ charts offering more detail and greater lake coverage than C-Map’s US Enhanced map that previously was included. (Courtesy Lowrance/)

Lowrance says all HDS Live displays that ship to consumers in June will be preloaded with C-Map’s Contour+ charts.

The high-resolution charts offer more detail and greater lake coverage than C-Map’s US Enhanced map that previously was included, according to Lowrance. Current HDS Live owners will have the option to purchase an HDS Live C-Map Contour+ chart card for a nominal fee.

Anyone who purchases an HDS Live display before August 1, 2020, can receive a free C-Map Contour+ map card via online rebate.

C-Map Contour+ charts cover inland and near-shore coastal areas of the continental United States, Hawaii and Bermuda. They have high-res bathymetric 1-foot contours, fishing points of interest, standard navigation data and custom depth shading.

The new cartography includes a more consistent presentation of data through all zoom levels, and improved icons for things like boat ramps and gas stations.

“We are constantly improving our product offerings to deliver a better on-the-water experience,” Knut Frostad, CEO of Navico, stated in a press release. “Our team has added an incredible amount of detail and streamlined the presentation in Contour+ charts. From finding the best spots to fish to knowing which lanes to run through vegetation, anglers will have an easier time finding the information they need for a successful day on the water.”

What’s the “nominal fee” for HDS Live owners who bought their displays before April 1 and want the upgrade? It’s $35.

For more information, visit: lowrance.com

Meet the Ferretti Yachts 500

Ferretti Yachts says the 500 will cruise at 25 knots and have a 30-knot top speed.
Ferretti Yachts says the 500 will cruise at 25 knots and have a 30-knot top speed. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

The Ferretti Yachts 500 is being promoted as a new model that ushers in an entirely new era for the Italian builder, with its design elements and styling expected to appear in larger models right up to Ferretti’s flagship.

Ferretti’s Product Strategy Committee led by Piero Ferrari worked on the design with the Ferretti Group’s Engineering Department, architect Filippo Salvetti (on exteriors) and design studio Ideaeitalia (on interiors).

“The design of the new Ferretti Yachts 500 highlights an overall dynamism thanks to new and innovative stylistic features of the superstructure,” Salvetti stated in a press release. “A natural heir to the Ferretti Yachts 720, it reinterprets the new styles of the range in a very personal way.”

Stairs flanking the teak beach provide easy access to the cockpit.
Stairs flanking the teak beach provide easy access to the cockpit. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

Owners can choose one of two interiors: classic, with dark oak, glossy and matte lacquers in black and white, brown and beige fabrics and leathers, and shiny nickel and dark marble; or contemporary, with sand-shaded oak, glossy and matte white lacquers, glass and polished steel accents, fabrics in gray, light blue and beige, and white marble.

Furnishings and accents in both interior schemes are by Graniti Fiandre, Galassia, OML, Colombo, Cadorin, Pellini, Paffoni and the Gentili Mosconi Home Collection of fabrics for Ferretti Yachts.

The Classic interior option has dark oak, glossy and matte lacquers in black and white.
The Classic interior option has dark oak, glossy and matte lacquers in black and white. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)The Contemporary interior option has sand-shaded oak, glossy and matte white lacquers, glass and polished steel accents.
The Contemporary interior option has sand-shaded oak, glossy and matte white lacquers, glass and polished steel accents. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

What are the performance projections? With twin 550-horsepower Cummins QSB 6.7 diesels, the top speed is 30 knots and the cruising speed is 25 knots, according to preliminary data from Ferretti Yachts.

For more information, visit: ferretti-yachts.com

Ready to Roam: Heesen’s Project Triton

The 163-foot Project Triton's exteriors are by Clifford Denn in France. The yacht's look was inspired by classic car design.
The 163-foot Project Triton's exteriors are by Clifford Denn in France. The yacht's look was inspired by classic car design. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)

Heesen Yachts in the Netherlands has completed sea trials on the 163-foot Project Triton, a full-displacement yacht with a steel hull and bulbous bow.

Design and engineering are by Heesen, with exteriors by Clifford Denn in France and interiors by Reymond Langton Design in the United Kingdom. Denn says that one of his inspirations for the exterior profile was classic car design, while the Reymond Langton team focused on interior elements that are linear and clean in a neutral palette.

The layout accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms, including a master forward on the main deck. Tenders and toys are stowed on the foredeck, leaving the aft space open for a beach club and wellness area. That latter area includes a bar and sauna, and has direct access to the swim platform.

Heesen says Project Triton can achieve a top speed of 15 knots, powered by twin MTU 8V 4000 M63 engines. Fuel capacity is 15,850 gallons, which reportedly gives the yacht a transoceanic range of 3,800 nautical miles at 12 to 13 knots. Water capacity is 5,300 gallons.

Project Triton has a transoceanic range of 3,800 nautical miles at 12 to 13 knots.
Project Triton has a transoceanic range of 3,800 nautical miles at 12 to 13 knots. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)The yacht's interiors are by Reymond Langton Design in the United Kingdom.
The yacht's interiors are by Reymond Langton Design in the United Kingdom. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)There are five staterooms with a main-deck master.
There are five staterooms with a main-deck master. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)

What else is new at Heesen? The shipyard launched Project Castor on May 14. The 180-foot, steel-hulled yacht is scheduled for delivery in August.

For more information, visit: heesenyachts.com

Interested in Antarctica Next Winter?

The 241-foot Freire <i>Naia</i> is planning to charter in Antarctica. Weekly base rate is $695,000.
The 241-foot Freire Naia is planning to charter in Antarctica. Weekly base rate is $695,000. (Courtesy YPI Group/)

Yachting Partners International says the 241-foot Freire Naia is now accepting inquiries for winter 2020-21 charters in Antarctica.

Naia is a 2011 build that accommodates 12 guests in their choice of eight staterooms. There are 22 crew on board.

Interiors are by designer Mark Berryman, with an owner’s deck that has 360-degree views and elevator access.

Other features include a helideck, an open-air gymnasium and an eight-person hot tub.

What’s the weekly base rate to charter Naia? It’s $695,000.

For more information, visit: ypigroup.com

KVH Offers 50 Percent Discount

KVH is giving its connectivity customers a 50 percent discount if they need to increase their data plans to handle more onboard usage.
KVH is giving its connectivity customers a 50 percent discount if they need to increase their data plans to handle more onboard usage. (Courtesy KVH/)

From now until the end of June, KVH is giving its connectivity customers a 50 percent discount if they need to increase their data plans to handle more onboard usage.

The discount is being offered as part of the company’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“We have made this offer to commercial maritime vessels and pleasure yachts, and already hundreds of vessels have upgraded,” the company stated in a press release. “In the commercial maritime world, connectivity is more important than ever, with many seafarers unable to go into port and thus needing connectivity to stay in touch or get news. For superyachts, we are seeing the uptake among yachts that have owners and their families on board for extended periods right now.”

Also new at KVH: On June 1, the company plans to add Mediterranean coverage to its KVH Elite unlimited VSAT streaming for superyachts. The service started in the Caribbean in November and now is expanding to the Mediterranean.

For more information, visit: kvh.com

Out There: Outerlimits SX-39

The SX-39 comes with three or four Mercury Verados with horsepower up to 1,800.
The SX-39 comes with three or four Mercury Verados with horsepower up to 1,800. (Courtesy Outerlimits/)

Outerlimits has made its bones by building some of the fastest boats in the world. The builder’s SV-43 currently holds the world record for fastest V-bottom, with a speed of 180.47 miles per hour. But lately, Outerlimits has turned its attention to producing fishing boats as well, the first of which is the SX-39 Center Console, which has a similar hull to the speedy SV-43. That hull has a five-step FVS (Fiore Ventilated Steps) system that Outerlimits credits its speed and nimbleness with.

The hull was designed by Outerlimits’ in-house designer Mike Fiore. It’s epoxy resin-impregnated e-glass with carbon fiber reinforcements, and is built using a vacuum-bag process. The SX-39 comes in either triple or quad Mercury outboard iterations, with a max of 1,800 hp. That should be enough giddy up to get this boat out to the fish before everyone else.

The SX-39 has a similar hull to a world-record-holding speedboat also built by Outerlimits.
The SX-39 has a similar hull to a world-record-holding speedboat also built by Outerlimits. (Courtesy Outerlimits/)

But this boat isn’t just a rocket ship. She’s got plenty of amenities and equipment to keep everyone happy. That list includes a carbon-fiber T-top with a JL Audio sound system, a head, sink and v-berth in the console and a dive door. There’s also a cockpit wetbar and a Garmin GPSMAP 1242XSV Touch multifunction unit at the helm. As for fishing amenities the boat has plenty of rodholders, two drained in-sole fish boxes and a built-in cooler aft.

The Outerlimits SX-39 is a stylish, fast and fun-to-drive boat that should make a good fit for fishermen and sandbar enthusiasts alike.

Meet the Dynamiq GTT 160

The GTT 160 has a 4,000-NM range at 10 knots.
The GTT 160 has a 4,000-NM range at 10 knots. (Courtesy Dynamiq Yachts/)

Dynamiq in Monaco has released renderings of the GTT 160, a 162-foot aluminum motoryacht with a starting price around $22 million.

Onboard amenities include a semi-open main deck with a gymnasium, spa, galley/breakfast bar and master stateroom with side balconies. Belowdecks are five guest staterooms, and there are quarters for eight crew. Up top are a helideck and sundeck.

The 162-foot Dynamiq GTT 160 is an all-aluminum build.
The 162-foot Dynamiq GTT 160 is an all-aluminum build. (Courtesy Dynamiq Yachts/)

Top speed is reportedly 17 knots, and Dynamiq says the vessel has a transatlantic range of 4,000 nautical miles at 10 knots. Gross tonnage is 399, and draft is 6 feet 6 inches.

How long does it take to build a Dynamiq GTT 160? Build time is 24 months from the date of contract signing, according to the shipyard.

For more information, visit: bedynamiq.com

Azimut’s Grande S10

Beach houses inspired the design of the Azimut Grande S10’s exterior look and layout.
Beach houses inspired the design of the Azimut Grande S10’s exterior look and layout. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Yacht designer Alberto Mancini’s brief for the Azimut Grande S10 was relatively simple. Beyond length and beam, the only condition was that the vessel should have obvious Azimut DNA. Everything else, he says, was effectively a blank sheet.

For inspiration, he looked to beach-house terraces in Malibu, California, the kind with multiple decks that descend to the sand and sea. That thinking led him to create about 550 square feet of outdoor space on the S10, including 150 square feet of foredeck “garden”; 215 square feet of flybridge with a lounge and wet bar; and 183 square feet of aft deck, not counting the fold-down bathing platform.

The two-zone aft-deck arrangement is particularly interesting. The stern is raised slightly and open for free-standing furniture, sun loungers, dancing—whatever owners want—while the inner zone by the aft-deck doors is protected and down a step, tucked beneath the top-deck overhang. It’s further shielded by centerline flybridge steps and a bank of wet-bar furniture, not to mention the carbon buttresses/fashion plates on both sides.

Mancini says that, in addition to his California dreaming, he thought about mega-sailers from Italian sailing-yacht builder Perini Navi when he was figuring out how this space could meld with the main salon.

Inside the sliding doors to the salon is something a bit different too. Instead of the conventional lounge area, there is a dining table occupying most of the after area to port. There’s a second set of sliding doors beyond the table, sweeping in at an angle from starboard. This double-door deal allows for a flexible, indoor-outdoor vibe. The doors can be completely open through to the lounge area and to the bridge beyond, or they can be closed or opened individually, depending on mood and practicality. The amidships lounge and TV area is all the better for deep side windows and three rectangular skylights.

To reduce weight aloft, Azimut used carbon fiber in constructing the yacht’s superstructure.
To reduce weight aloft, Azimut used carbon fiber in constructing the yacht’s superstructure. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Both the dining area and adjacent cockpit have 4-inch teak planking that’s laid athwartships and have the same bare teak joist signatures as on the headliners, creating a stylish look. There’s an opening window to port, and to starboard are a door and glazing to conceal crew access. From there, a staircase descends beneath the dining area to the galley, crew mess and crew quarters (as many as three cabins for four crew or two cabins and a laundry room).

Francesco Guida designed the S10’s interior. Heavy on white lacquer, brushed and stained oaks, and travertine stones in the heads, the decor is Italian chic with a hint of art deco. No matter whether owners prefer formal or informal, it works.

The bridge console is more than it seems too. Most of the Naviop-integrated instrumentation is set into a fold-down box, which, when up, presents two touchscreen displays. When rolled down, this box shows much of the same information on seven small-screen repeaters. The latter setup generally improves the view through the windshield when the yacht is at rest and cuts down on reflections during nighttime navigation.

The standard accommodations layout has four en suite staterooms. The full-beam owner’s stateroom is amidships with an aft-facing island berth, sofa, vanity/desk and walk-in closet. The hullside windows (27-by-68 inches apiece) have Venetian blinds and super views. The trade-off for that sizable stateroom is the placement of the VIP, which is tucked in the bow with a diagonal double berth. Twin- and transverse-berth staterooms are just off the middle of the guest companionway.

Instead of running fore to aft, the teak soles (inside and outside) are set athwartships.
Instead of running fore to aft, the teak soles (inside and outside) are set athwartships. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

The S10 has a length overall of 94 feet, 3 inches and officially comes in under the 24-meter load-line-length requirements that add cost and complexity. Getting the design approved required excluding the stern platform and transom, and a substantial chunk of the bow, from the official hull measurement. In theory, both are detachable without compromising structural integrity.

According to Davide Cipriani, CEO at the engineering firm Centrostile, the project required around 50,000 hours of work by a project team of 10. Their other big challenge was to optimize interior heights without compromising the yacht’s striking profile. Weight reduction was also a critical component; while the hull is essentially laminated with a vinylester resin, carbon fiber is used for the superstructure, flybridge and hardtop moldings.

That’s not to say that styling took a back seat. Check out the high-gloss, teak-and-carbon-fiber rails that ring the foredeck, reminding me of a crossbow. Also see the sculptural steps made of teak and carbon-fiber as well as the stainless-steel banisters en route to the flybridge. There’s also some quirkiness: Part of the superstructure on each quarter hinges up to almost vertical, creating posts to which a Bimini top can be stretched. The inspiration for this setup was the way the doors open on supercars like the Lamborghini Aventador. Mancini says he also gave considerable thought to how the yacht looks at night, so owners can spot it easily in a busy anchorage when returning by tender from shore.

Power for the Azimut Grande S10 is twin 2,600 hp MTU 16V 2000 M96L diesels. Top speed: 35 knots.
Power for the Azimut Grande S10 is twin 2,600 hp MTU 16V 2000 M96L diesels. Top speed: 35 knots. (Courtesy Azimut Yachts/)

Twin 2,600 hp MTU 16V 2000 M96Ls—whirring out via V-boxes to five-blade, 3-foot-11-inch-diameter props—push the S10 to a top speed of 35 knots. At a fast cruise of 30 knots, and allowing for a 10 percent fuel reserve, this yacht should be good for up to 350 nautical miles between fuel stops. That range stretches to more than 750 nm if owners stick to 12 knots.

The engine room is nicely arranged as well. Headroom at the forward end is 6 feet, 6 inches, and both engines can be circumnavigated, albeit on hands and knees at the very back. The stern garage can hold a jet tender of about 14 feet length overall, plus a PWC and a couple Seabobs.

With the Grande S10, Azimut Yachts incorporates considerable space and volume into a yacht that maintains sleek lines and impressive performance. Those qualities, along with her designer pedigree, should give the S10 a wide appeal.

Take the next step: azimutyachts.com

A Deep Dive with Navico

Constant testing, evaluation and a dedication to quality control are all keys to Navico’s manufacturing success.
Constant testing, evaluation and a dedication to quality control are all keys to Navico’s manufacturing success. (David Schmidt/)

Mechanical rollers guide printed circuit boards down Navico’s production line at its factory in Ensenada, Mexico, sending them toward a pick-and-place machine that houses what looks like a 120-barrel Gatling gun. Instead of hurling hot lead, the machine’s nozzles quickly rotate and momentarily dip down—typewriter style—to place microchips onto the double-sided circuit boards. Seconds later, the machine guides the boards down the line as the next ones enter the shooting gallery, bound for assembly, exhaustive testing, packaging and then random batch-testing before shipping out. The world will see them as finished B&G, Lowrance and Simrad products.

This tightly controlled process involves a blur of high-tech machinery that enables this factory and its skilled workforce to produce up to 10,000 completed boards per day. And the boards will see service on waters around the globe.

B&G, Lowrance and Simrad were founded in 1956, 1957 and 1947, respectively. They merged in 2006 in a deal that created parent company Navico, based in Egersund, Norway, with offices in New Zealand, the UK and the United States. Collectively, the brands employ 1,800 people, and the merger created scales of economy and efficiency that allowed Navico to leverage each brand to better serve all three.

One example is the company’s Ensenada, Mexico, factory, which Lowrance built in 1993. Lowrance trained the local workforce, and following the merger, Navico expanded this facility and staff to tackle global production for all three brands.

Inside the factory, equipment is tested thousands of times before it leaves. Navico’s upstairs offices hum with activity as employees plan jobs that will be executed on the factory line.

Dynamic teamwork is what makes the place run, says Tim Tsai, vice president and head of procurement. “The electronics market changes fast, things come up fast—for example, tariffs or other market constrictors—so, as a team, we have to come up with solutions.”

I’m asked to wear a special overshirt that’s woven with carbon-fiber threads that prevent static-electricity buildup. Then I head to Navico’s R&D department, which is populated with open-air workstations festooned with miles of cables, tools, analog and digital interfaces, myriad black boxes, and countless screens. Testing stations and benches fill additional rooms. A few steps later, I’m at the quality-assurance room, where engineers are dissecting Simrad multifunction displays.

“The [quality-assurance] people also go out on the water and test the software and hardware on our Navico One test boat here in Ensenada,” says Ivan Garin, R&D manager. “And we also use external evaluators,” such as local captains and Navico-sponsored pros.

All returned merchandise is evaluated for faults, and lessons learned are quickly implemented into the manufacturing line.
All returned merchandise is evaluated for faults, and lessons learned are quickly implemented into the manufacturing line. (David Schmidt/)

We pass Navico’s optical group en route to prototyping rooms equipped with 3D printers, a laser cutter, and a temperature- and-humidity chamber that delivers 12 test cycles at temperatures ranging from minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit to 185 degrees Fahrenheit. “We go beyond what the customer expects and what our [equipment] actually experiences,” Garin says as he leads me into a soundproof chamber with a medieval-looking machine used for drop-testing equipment.

Our next stop is the roof, with a view of Ensenada and Navico’s expansive facility. On the far end are three consoles that allow Navico engineers to simulate onboard installations, evaluate ergonomics, and test the equipment in the unflinching sunlight of Baja, California. “It’s a big advantage to be right near the factory,” Garin says. “We can check on the line, and they can use this facility.”

Back inside, I head to Navico’s machine shop, where the company builds its own tools, dies, and work- and production-line stations. Then, I’m in the returned-merchandise area. A massive shrink-wrapped package rests on a pallet as workers organize this equipment, while others dissect and evaluate it. “If it’s a manufacturing problem, they go to the engineers, show them the issue, and the engineers can make a change on the factory line,” says Ricardo Varela, vice president of manufacturing.

This focus on quality is a frequently visited theme, and synergy certainly does exist between Navico’s R&D and returns departments and the factory. But this “dynamic teamwork” is exceeded by the levels of testing, evaluation and—should issues arise—surge-style troubleshooting that exist on the factory line.

“We’ll start where the product starts and follow the process,” Varela says, guiding us to the assembly line that builds printed circuit boards. The process begins with partially assembled boards that, in this case, come as even bigger three-board panels, which are later sliced into double-sided boards.

These panels are fed into a solder-paste printing machine that uses a serigraphy-style process to deposit solder—in paste form—over the board’s contacts to accommodate down-the-line

attachments, before being fed to the pick-and-place machine. Next, each board goes to a human quality-assurance technician who reviews it and places any necessary additional componentry before feeding it into a wave-soldering machine. From here, the board enters an X-ray machine, which ensures there aren’t any solder breaches before passing it to the in-circuit testing machine.

I watch as long-fingered probes test to ensure that each node offers the correct resistance. “We test the heck out of it,” Ricardo says, adding that this single machine performs 600 tests before releasing the board.

If there is a failed test, Varela says, then each section of the factory has a core team composed of quality-assurance, industrial and test-process engineers who can stop the line and diagnose issues. Once the problem is rectified, workers then backcheck previous batches to ensure any previous hiccups are corralled. Each component, irrespective of its size, is assigned a smart card as it’s received by the factory, allowing Navico to track everything—including factory-line test results—in a central database from start to finish.

A printed circuit board, en route to a pick-and-place machine that will precisely position microchips on both sides of the board.
A printed circuit board, en route to a pick-and-place machine that will precisely position microchips on both sides of the board. (David Schmidt/)

At the end of the board-building line, the completed and soldered boards emerge and are sliced along pre-perforated lines into individual boards, which are then bench-tested. Software and cartography are loaded onto each vetted board. From here, the boards are sent to final assembly, where they become part of—for example—a radar or a multifunction display.

The sonar- and display-assembly lines are where workers pre-place touchscreen-sensitive screens that are then machine-guided onto LCD displays—and where I see tiny sonar crystals being placed onto delicate crystal arrays.

Varela leads me past the submersion tanks, where sonars are tested, before we head to the packing and content-assurance room. Workers scan each part number that comprises a finished product (in other words, a display and all its cabling, mounting hardware, and literature) before boxing them up. Computers control all forward motion. If a particular product doesn’t include all the necessary part numbers or comes up shy on a weight test (think of those self-checkout lines at grocery stores), then production stops, core team members are summoned, and the faulty product is taken to the “fish market” (“because it stinks”), where the situation is evaluated.

Once packaged, wrapped and labeled, some 25 percent of all finished products are then subjected to random testing. This includes a full unpackaging, bench testing and systems test, and ensures that faulty product doesn’t inadvertently make it out the door. “We test products on every level, many times,” Varela says.

The final stop is the company’s warehouse, where incoming parts are received and stored, and where finished products are temporarily shelved. Most parts spend just one week morphing from componentry to finished products.

Varela points over to a wall covered from end to end with photographs honoring employees who have been with the company more than five years—some of them for as long as 25 years. Counting all the names and faces, I soon realize that Navico’s high employee-retention rate serves as an important final exam for a marine electronics factory that generates far more test results than finished products.

Brokerage: Hinckley Talaria 44

Owners were able to swap out the dinette belowdecks for a double-berth guest stateroom.
Owners were able to swap out the dinette belowdecks for a double-berth guest stateroom. (Courtesy Hinckley Yachts/)

Between 1999 and 2011, Hinckley Yachts built 82 Talaria 44s, 17 of which were flybridge models. (There were express and enclosed-bridge versions too.)

The 44, powered with various Yanmar diesel options, has downeast lines and waterjet propulsion.

Construction is resin-infused Kevlar, E-glass and carbon fiber.

The galley and dinette are down to port and starboard, respectively, and there is a forepeak master stateroom.

At press time, two Talaria 44 flybridge models were available, at $397,000 for a 2002 with 655 engine hours and $595,000 for a 2007 with 955 engine hours.

From the Archive

“But it’s the JetStick that really sets this yacht apart. …As you near the dock, simply switch to docking mode by pushing a button, which activates the JetStick and disengages the wheel. Push the joystick sideways, and the computer determines the proportion of bow thruster and jets needed to nudge the boat sideways, with speed controlled by your pressure on the JetStick.” —Yachting, October 2007

A Hull Turns at Alia Yachts

Alia Yachts recently flipped the hull to its 118-footer.
Alia Yachts recently flipped the hull to its 118-footer. (Alia Yachts/)

Alia Yachts in Turkey has turned the hull of the 118-foot aluminum shadow yacht it is building to support the 180-foot Project Phi that’s in build at Royal Huisman in the Netherlands.

“This is a very interesting project for us which we foresee will provide a platform that can be adapted to meet the needs of other superyacht owners,” Gokhan Çelik, president of Alia Yachts, stated in a press release. “The principle challenge is that it has to be very fast but also versatile and efficient.”

The shadow boat that Alia is building is expected to come in at 199 gross tons. Specifications call for a nearly 1,700-square-foot cargo deck, a 485-square-foot lazarette and a 355-square-foot workshop. Tenders and toys will be carried on board, as well as a land vehicle and extra fuel for the mothership yacht.

The 118-foot shadow yacht is designed to support the 180-foot Royal Huisman-built Project Phi.
The 118-foot shadow yacht is designed to support the 180-foot Royal Huisman-built Project Phi. (Alia Yachts/)

“The exterior lines and details have been styled to resemble the mothership,” Cor D. Rover, who designed both vessels, stated in the press release. “So, there is a distinct family resemblance, but as a shadow vessel her prime function is to support the bigger yacht.”

Key details about the shadow vessel: She’s expected to have a range of 4,200 nautical miles at 12 knots, with Caterpillar C32 engines that provide a top speed of 21 knots.

For more information, visit: aliayachts.com

Price Reduction on 84-Foot Cheoy Lee

The new asking price for the 84-foot Cheoy Lee <i>Scott Free</i> is $1,899,000.
The new asking price for the 84-foot Cheoy Lee Scott Free is $1,899,000. (Courtesy Denison Yachting/)

Broker Will Noftsinger at Denison Yachting says the owner of the 84-foot Cheoy Lee Scott Free has dropped his asking price. The new price is $1,899,000.

Scott Free is lying in Fort Lauderdale. She’s a 2006 build that spent most of her life in fresh water, until a few years ago. Features include stabilizers, bow and stern thrusters, and a new audiovisual system. A hydraulic swim platform aft holds the tender.

Also noteworthy is that Scott Free was designed with a removable hardtop that can be stowed on the foredeck, should the owner want to cruise the Great Loop and have to reduce air draft to get under bridges.

Inside is a four-stateroom layout with five heads.

In the engine room: Scott Free has twin Caterpillar C30 engines showing 2,200 hours, according to the sales broker. Her cruising speed is reportedly 21 knots with a top hop of 26 knots.

For more information, visit: denisonyachting.com

Custom Line Navetta 30 Coming this Fall

At 10 knots, the Custom Line Navetta has a 2,150-nautical-mile range. The yacht will debut this fall.
At 10 knots, the Custom Line Navetta has a 2,150-nautical-mile range. The yacht will debut this fall. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

Custom Line, part of the Ferretti Group in Italy, says its 93-foot Navetta 30 is on track to premiere at this fall’s boat shows.

The Custom Line Navetta 30 is the first yacht from the builder with interiors by Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel. Exteriors are by Filippo Salvetti.

“The new Navetta 30 takes us into a new dimension in design,” Stefano de Vivo, the Ferretti Group’s chief commercial officer, stated in a press release. “Due to the huge success enjoyed by the new Navetta generation, we want every new project to have the sensational verve of a masterpiece.”

The Navetta 30 is Custom Line's first collaboration with interior designer Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel.
The Navetta 30 is Custom Line's first collaboration with interior designer Antonio Citterio Patricia Viel. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

Design elements include a shortened drop from the superstructure on the upper deck near the owner’s cabin glazing, creating a racy, sporty appearance. There’s also a gap between the hull and the superstructure, created by raising the joints with the upper deck to form two clearly separate parts.

“It was essential to find the right balance between the hull and the superstructure and emphasize the way the external lines stretch out horizontally in order to add a little vivacious verve to this distinctive, complex creation,” Salvetti stated in the press release.

Interior details are also unique, according to Custom Line, with carbon detailing, quartz fibers and more that combine to create custom textures. Lacquer is also part of the design scheme, as are fabrics with “ultramarine blue” stripes.

The foredeck lounge offers a quiet spot for sundowners with guests.
The foredeck lounge offers a quiet spot for sundowners with guests. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

Key performance figures: According to Custom Line, the standard 800-horsepower MAN 16 engines provide a top speed of 14 knots and a range of 2,150 nautical miles at 10 knots. Owners also can opt for 1,000- or 1,200-horsepower MAN V-8s.

For more information, visit: customline-yacht.com

New Nordhavn Flagship

The Nordhavn 148 will reportedly have a maximum cruising range of 6,000 nautical miles at 8 knots.
The Nordhavn 148 will reportedly have a maximum cruising range of 6,000 nautical miles at 8 knots. (Courtesy Vripack/)

It’s been over 30 years years since Nordhavn entered the powerboat market with its N46, a fiberglass vessel designed to cross oceans and penned with what has become the builder’s trademark shiplike aesthetic. And it’s been just over 20 years since the company’s founders took Hull No. 21 of its smallest model, the N40—a mini explorer yacht built by Pacific Seacraft in California—and cruised 26,000 miles around the world during a 27-week voyage. The circumnavigation helped to solidify the Nordhavn brand as being ideal for yachtsmen who wanted to venture to remote locales.

As the years have progressed, so have the sizes of Nordhavn’s models. The largest fiberglass yacht—the Nordhavn 120—launched this past fall. And, not to rest on its mega-yacht laurels, the builder recently partnered with Dutch yacht-design firm Vripack to build its first metal superyacht: the Nordhavn 148. It is the builder’s second collaboration with Vripack, which also worked on the Nord- havn 80.

The 148—with an exterior design from the builder and Vripack, and interior design and naval architecture from Vripack—will have a steel hull and an aluminum superstructure. The hull will also be outfitted with an ice belt: reinforced plating around the waterline where the hull would come into contact with ice. This could prove invaluable if her owner cruises in high latitudes. According to Vripack, the yacht is designed to operate in water temperatures as low as 39 degrees Fahrenheit and as high as about 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Nordhavn 148 is more than 100 feet longer than the yacht that launched the brand.
The Nordhavn 148 is more than 100 feet longer than the yacht that launched the brand. (Courtesy Vripack/)

The builder says that constructing the yacht in steel and aluminum creates more flexibility for owners to customize the layout too.

Power will be twin 741 hp Caterpillar C-18 diesels, which are compliant with Tier III emissions requirements. The 148’s projected top speed is around 14 knots, with a 6,000-nautical-mile range at 8 knots. A 114 hp hydraulic bow thruster will help with close-quarters maneuvering.

The yacht is expected to come in at about 495 gross tons, about a 25 percent increase in volume over the builder’s current 120 flagship. Draft will reportedly be 9 feet at full load, and standard zero-speed stabilization should help keep the 148 on an even keel.

There will be accommodations for 12 people, including a main-deck owner’s suite, with four guest staterooms belowdecks housing two double berths, two single berths and two Pullman berths. There are also five cabins for crew and the captain.

According to the builder, the Nordhavn 148 should take less than two years to complete. Stay tuned for more.

Take the next step: nordhavn.com

Hodgdon’s Latest

This tender’s features include custom stainless-steel exhaust vents and carbon-fiber handholds that are reminiscent of mega-yachts.
This tender’s features include custom stainless-steel exhaust vents and carbon-fiber handholds that are reminiscent of mega-yachts. (Courtesy Hodgdon Yachts/)

Maine-based Hodgdon’s superyacht- tender division, Hodgdon Tenders, recently introduced the Crossover series, the first of which will be a 26-foot-3-inch open model. The line is eventually expected to include Open, Beachlander and Limousine builds up to 36 feet length overall. Nautical design and styling for all the boats will be done by Philippe Carbon and Cyril Le Sourd, while engineering will be taken care of by Hodgdon’s in-house team. The 8.0 Open has a single Volvo Penta D3-220 straight-shaft engine and can fit 12 people on board.

Whom It’s For: This tender is for the mega-yacht owner who likes European style but wants an American vessel with a shipbuilding pedigree that stretches all the way back to 1816, the year Hodgdon was founded.

Picture This: You’re ferrying your parents and kids from the big boat to your favorite secluded beach. But there’s no need to worry about old knees and little legs being able to hop out of your Hodgdon once you get to shore. Thanks to a foldout bow ramp, everyone can hit the sand easily and happily.

Take the next step: hodgdonyachts.com

Made in the Shade

SureShade’s M3 system creates sun protection for cockpits and foredecks.
SureShade’s M3 system creates sun protection for cockpits and foredecks. (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

Sureshade’s M3 Automated Mega Shade is for larger yachts, giving owners the ability to throw crowd-pleasing shade over foredecks, bow areas and cockpits. Electric motors deploy the M3’s three-stage telescoping stainless-steel frame, which supports a Sunbrella awning. Mega Shades come in 9-, 10- and 12-foot extensions, and the canvas is available in dozens of colors.

“The challenge [was] maintaining our robust, self-supported framework while increasing our extension length to accommodate larger boats,” says Ron Russikoff, SureShade’s co-founder.

“We’ve been able to deliver our new 12-foot [M3] after undergoing extensive engineering to ensure we maintain a high-quality product.”

M3 systems are for vessels about 35 feet length overall and longer.

Take the next step: sureshade.com

Islamorada Is Back

At the ends of most Islamorada docks, you’ll see boats rigged for bluewater fishing. The location is between the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, right on the migration route for many fish.
At the ends of most Islamorada docks, you’ll see boats rigged for bluewater fishing. The location is between the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico, right on the migration route for many fish. (Unsplash/Keith-Luke/)

One of the photos USA Today ran in September 2017 to show damage after Hurricane Irma was of Bud N’ Mary’s Marina, an icon of the Florida Keys on Islamorada that has been around since 1944. More than 40 fishing captains and guides tie up there, and the docks were utterly mangled.

Today, it’s like none of it ever happened.

“Our part of the Keys, and I think probably Keys-wide, everything’s back to normal,” says Stephen Byrd, the marina’s assistant manager. “Especially from Marathon up to the north—you won’t see probably any sign of any damage.”

Even better, he says, since Irma left, inshore fishing has improved. Florida Bay was “flushed out,” with old water gone and newer water in.

“It’s a refreshing of sorts,” he says. “The bonefishing is better now, snook fishing is great, tarpon fishing—it’s good.”

Offshore fishing is also still solid, he says, because Irma didn’t wreck the reef. As of December 2019, sailfishing was just as hot as it’s always been off Islamorada, and Byrd is expecting March and April to bring the same kind of bonanza that this time of year has meant in the past.

“March usually is the beginning of the spring season, so we’re still having cold fronts, but you start seeing the change in the weather pattern, and with that, the species start to change,” he says. “March is a really good time to fish because you still see the winter sailfish, the cobia and others, but you also start to see tuna showing up. It’s in the middle, so it’s a cool time.”

It’s a windy time too—winds are typically easterly at a minimum of 10 to 15 knots—but if yachtsmen can handle that, he says, then the only other consideration is getting a slip. Because so many marinas had to rebuild after Irma, locals moved their seasonal slip reservations around, taking some slips that used to be transient. Thus, visitors arriving by boat may need to adjust their usual dockage plans.

“Things just shifted,” Byrd says. “You just want to call ahead.”

Slips Available

Bud N’ Mary’s Marina on Islamorada has a limited number of slips available for visiting boats up to 45 feet length overall. Gas and diesel are at the fuel dock, and there’s a shop with bait, tackle and ice.

Amels 200 Begins Outfitting

The Amels 200 is scheduled for delivery in 2021.
The Amels 200 is scheduled for delivery in 2021. (Courtesy Amels/)

The Amels shipyard in the Netherlands has begun outfitting on an Amels 200. Exterior design is by Tim Heywood, and the interior is the first collaboration between the shipyard and Laura Pomponi of Luxury Projects in Ancona, Italy.

This yacht is one of two Amels 200s that are scheduled for delivery in 2021, with construction proceeding despite the global pandemic. They follow the delivery of the first Amels 200, Volpini 2.

This build is a first-time collaboration between Amels and Laura Pomponi of Luxury Projects in Ancona, Italy.
This build is a first-time collaboration between Amels and Laura Pomponi of Luxury Projects in Ancona, Italy. (Courtesy Amels/)

“During these challenging times, we’ve taken wide-ranging measures at our yards to minimize the impact and spread of the virus,” Managing Director Rose Damen stated in a press release. “The health and wellbeing of those working at the yard is our top priority. So the arrival of this new hull shows a great determination and adaptability from everyone involved, including our suppliers. It gives me a lot of confidence that we will get through this crisis in our industry together.”

The yacht will have hybrid diesel-electric power, which should reduce emissions.
The yacht will have hybrid diesel-electric power, which should reduce emissions. (Courtesy Amels/)

What are the key features aboard the Amels 200? Accommodations for 12 guests, a four-deck elevator, an air-conditioned gym on the sundeck, hybrid power and reduced emissions.

For more information, visit: amels-holland.com

True Transformer: Dynamiq GTM 90

With triple Volvo Penta IPS1350s, the Dynamiq GTM90 will have a 30-knot top-end speed.
With triple Volvo Penta IPS1350s, the Dynamiq GTM90 will have a 30-knot top-end speed. (Courtesy Dynamiq/)

Monaco-based Dynamiq has unveiled the Dynamiq GTM 90, developed in partnership with the German car-tuning company Klassen. The idea is to have a yacht that can be open by day and closed off by night, or in case of bad weather.

“We looked at the markets with more extreme climates where, together with cruising excitement, the yacht should be a safe shelter for guests when needed,” Dynamiq founder Sergei Dobroserdov stated in a press release. “Places like the Arabian peninsula, Asian destinations and Northern Europe. This is where the yacht needs to be open and full of sea breeze during the daytime, but almost closed when evening comes and the temperature rapidly drops.”

The Dynamiq GTM90 was developed in partnership with German car-tuning company Klassen.
The Dynamiq GTM90 was developed in partnership with German car-tuning company Klassen. (Courtesy Dynamiq/)

Aboard the Dynamiq GTM 90, the beach club, dining area and open galley with bar can be open or closed thanks to sliding doors and folding bulwarks. The lines of supercars inspired the exterior design and some interior features, including upholstery, wood paneling, LED courtesy lights and the looks of the wheelhouse.

Van Oossanen Naval Architects in the Netherlands helped develop the hull lines, which, according to Dynamiq, help the yacht to achieve more than 30 knots with triple Volvo Penta IPS1350s. Range, according to the builder, is 800 nautical miles at 17 knots.

Note how the master stateroom's berth position opens up floor space.
Note how the master stateroom's berth position opens up floor space. (Courtesy Dynamiq/)

How many staterooms are on board? Four, all on the lower deck, including the master stateroom. It has a circular bed from the Bentley Home collection and a head finished in onyx with a hammam.

For more information, visit: bedynamiq.com

Coming Soon: Atlantic 115

This 115-footer can attain a maximum speed of 20 knots.
This 115-footer can attain a maximum speed of 20 knots. (Courtesy Atlantic Yacht and Ship/)

Atlantic Yacht and Ship, in conjunction with the HeySea shipyard, has announced the arrival of the Atlantic 115 in Florida this summer. The yacht is a raised pilothouse design that was penned by Jure Bukavec with the American market in mind. The interior was done by H2 Yacht Design of London.

Features that should be a hit in the domestic market include large windows throughout to maximize interior lighting and give the interior an open and airy feeling, a beach club aft, stabilization mechanisms and an extra-wide beam of 26 feet.

Atlantic is putting over 100,000 hours worth of construction into each yacht, to ensure that all of the details, such as weight distribution and fit and finish, were nailed. Prospective buyers can expect to see the same quality on the 115 as on recent Atlantic launches like King Baby and Serenity.

Atlantic worked with many top charter captains to formulate a boat with features that will appeal to potential charter guests. The 115 will have a 20-knot cruise speed with twin 1,800 hp Caterpillar C32 Acerts. She will also have a 5-foot, 8-inch draft that is friendly to the skinny waters of the Bahamas and Florida’s west coast.

The Atlantic 115 has a standard five-stateroom layout with the master on the main deck that features a private terrace and 270-degree views. The guest cabins are on the accommodations level. A six-cabin layout is also available should the owner envision hosting larger parties.

Other onboard features that charter guests and owners alike will appreciate include an OpacMare Transformer that hydraulically elevates and lowers to make swimming, scuba diving and tender deployment easier. The flybridge is also blessed with a Jacuzzi that will no doubt be a favorite of many as the Atlantic 115 powers through the tropical climes she was expressly designed to enjoy.

The Atlantic 115’s bowdeck provides a private area to relax and socialize.
The Atlantic 115’s bowdeck provides a private area to relax and socialize. (Courtesy Atlantic Yacht and Ship/)Notice how the large windows let in lots of natural light to blend inside and out.
Notice how the large windows let in lots of natural light to blend inside and out. (Courtesy Atlantic Yacht and Ship/)The Atlantic 115’s master is on the maindeck and has excellent views.
The Atlantic 115’s master is on the maindeck and has excellent views. (Courtesy Atlantic Yacht and Ship/)Plenty of attention was paid to this yacht’s exterior entertainment areas.
Plenty of attention was paid to this yacht’s exterior entertainment areas. (Courtesy Atlantic Yacht and Ship/)

Take the next step: atlanticyachtandship.com

CL Yachts Introduces the CLB88

Powered with twin 1,600 hp Caterpillar C32s, the CLB88 has a reported top speed of 25 knots.
Powered with twin 1,600 hp Caterpillar C32s, the CLB88 has a reported top speed of 25 knots. (Courtesy CL Yachts/)

Looking at the CL Yachts CLB88 in profile, it’s easy to see the successful blending of several key design elements.

Note the yacht’s fine entry and high freeboard forward, and how the form transitions into the straight sheer line that gently descends in height as it stretches aft, resolving at the cockpit. The subtle drop helps create a relatively aggressive profile. It’s a look that’s enhanced by the CLB88’s raked windows forward, and the lean-forward look of the hardtop and supports on the flybridge. It’s an amalgam of shapes creating a singular, salty aesthetic.

The yacht's extended flybridge overhang protects the cockpit dining table from the elements.
The yacht's extended flybridge overhang protects the cockpit dining table from the elements. (Courtesy CL Yachts/)

Beneath the seafaring look is function. The yacht has a resin-infused build in a combination of fiberglass and carbon fiber, to help reduce weight and maintain strength. In total, the CLB88 has a 175,000-pound displacement. The hull form is reinforced by a 3,000-gallon integral fuel tank, essentially creating a double-hull bottom.

The CLB88’s interior is “floated” too, meaning interior elements are not directly tied into the yacht’s support structure, resulting in reduced vibration and what should be a relatively quiet ride.

This motoryacht’s ride could also be spirited, when desired. The yacht has twin 1,600 hp Caterpillar C32 Acert diesels that reportedly push it to a 25-knot top hop.

A key interior design feature is the unobstructed floor plan. Note the nearly 360 degrees of glass.
A key interior design feature is the unobstructed floor plan. Note the nearly 360 degrees of glass. (Courtesy CL Yachts/)

For large cruising families, the CLB88 is outfitted with four guest staterooms, plus two crew cabins. There are five guest heads and one crew head. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships with three guest staterooms accommodating six guests. The crew cabins are abaft the engine room.

A constant connection to the sea is found on the main deck where the salon, formal dining table and helm forward are surrounded by nearly 360 degrees of glass. The light passing through the glass adds to the CLB88’s sense of interior volume. The salon is outfitted with an L-shaped settee to port and loose chairs across, both are within earshot of the dining table for six guests.

The view from the yacht's lower helm and country kitchen. A pantograph-style door provides side-deck access.
The view from the yacht's lower helm and country kitchen. A pantograph-style door provides side-deck access. (Courtesy CL Yachts/)

There is a lower helm and country kitchen forward. The helm-to starboard-has a double-wide seat and there is side-deck access via a pantograph-style door to starboard. Across from the helm is a dinette for breakfast with a view. Just abaft the dinette is the galley, which easily services the salon and the country kitchen.

In addition to the interior entertainment spaces, the CLB88’s flybridge is outfitted for alfresco meals with L-shaped seating and a table to port, and a bar with five stools to starboard. Forward on centerline is the helm station, and to port is companion seating for two guests. All the way aft is real estate for a pair of chaise-style chairs and a davit for a tender.

The CLB88's amidships master stateroom span's the vessel's full 22-foot-6-inch beam.
The CLB88's amidships master stateroom span's the vessel's full 22-foot-6-inch beam. (Courtesy CL Yachts/)

The CLB88 is a vessel for yachtsmen ready to transition from owner-operator to a full- or part-time crew. The yacht has room for the growing cruising family, admirable performance, an open floor plan, a bluewater-worthy build and the ability to customize to an owner’s desires.

Schedule to launch this summer, look for the CL Yachts CLB88 at the fall boat shows.

For more information, visit: clyachts.com

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 88’11”
  • Maximum Beam: 22’6”
  • Draft: 5’5”
  • Displacement: 175,000
  • Fuel Capacity: 3,000 Gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 460 Gal.
  • Power: 2/1,600 hp Caterpillar C32 Acert diesels
  • Maximum Speed: 25 knots
Top