Victory Yacht Sales

News & Events

Hobie Launches New Kayak

The Hobie Mirage Passport 10.5 is built for one rider with a total weight capacity of 325 pounds.
The Hobie Mirage Passport 10.5 is built for one rider with a total weight capacity of 325 pounds. (Courtesy Hobie/)

Here’s a fun fact: Hobie, the California-based company best known for its Sunfish and catamaran sailboats, has spent the past two decades or so seeing 15 percent to 25 percent growth year after year in demand for fishing kayaks, according to Morgan Promnitz, Hobie’s senior fishing brand manager. During the past five years, he says, kayak-fishing has gone mainstream, with manufacturers of rods, tackle systems and more making gear for anglers who plan to kayak to the fish stealthily, instead of cruising there in a tender with an outboard engine that scares the catch away.

“It’s probably been the fastest-growing segment of the fishing industry in the past six years,” he says of kayak-fishing.

The Hobie Mirage Passport 10.5 comes standard with two rod holders and an accessory mount for a Bimini top or sail.
The Hobie Mirage Passport 10.5 comes standard with two rod holders and an accessory mount for a Bimini top or sail. (Courtesy Hobie/)

The fact that so many novices want to try the sport is why Hobie just launched its Mirage Passport 10.5 kayak. At $1,299, it’s not intended to compete with the company’s $3,500 tricked-out models for hardcore anglers. Instead, the Mirage Passport 10.5 is an all-purpose kayak for exploring and shoreline fun, but with just enough standard features and removable options that die-hard fishermen also will be happy when they’re the ones heading out.

“The Passports have a track system on either side of the cockpit, on the gunwales, so you can use any accessory that fits into the track: a camera mount, extra rod holders, tool holders, a fish-finder mount, flags, lighting systems—we sell all of them,” Promnitz says. He adds that everything can be removed for safekeeping when the fishing is done and the kids want to play on the kayak.

Key accessories for yachtsmen who want to fish, he says, include Hobie’s H-Crate, which fits in the back of the kayak with tackle stowage, as well as four rod holders and a way to clamp on accessories.  “We also make a livewell, which actually has a battery and a pump in it with three rod holders on the back,” he says. “It plugs into the rear scupper holds. If you want to fish with live bait, you can put it in this livewell and take it with you.”

Hobie’s Classic MirageDrive pedal system lets kayakers use their legs instead of their arms (and a paddle) to move. The system keeps hands free for holding rods or baiting hooks while kayak-fishing.
Hobie’s Classic MirageDrive pedal system lets kayakers use their legs instead of their arms (and a paddle) to move. The system keeps hands free for holding rods or baiting hooks while kayak-fishing. (Courtesy Hobie/)This kayak has a rudder that folds away or can be removed, so the kayak itself can stow flat in a yacht’s lazarette. Multiple kayaks can be stacked to take up even less square footage in the toy department.
This kayak has a rudder that folds away or can be removed, so the kayak itself can stow flat in a yacht’s lazarette. Multiple kayaks can be stacked to take up even less square footage in the toy department. (Courtesy Hobie/)

For owners who offer their yachts for charter, the kayak is not only versatile, but also built to take a beating. Unlike Hobie’s roto-molded kayaks, the Mirage Passport 10.5 is made with thermo-forming technology, which means a machine heats the plastic to create two polyethylene pieces that are welded together. The process lets Hobie offer the kayak at a lower price while maintaining strength.

“It’s a plastic that is very, very durable,” Promnitz says. “You can bang it into rocks or drag it over boat ramps, and it’s going to hold up for a long time.”

$100,000 Price Drop on Ferretti Motoryacht

Asking price for the 81-foot Ferretti Yachts <em>La Pace</em>: $2,395,000.
Asking price for the 81-foot Ferretti Yachts La Pace: $2,395,000. (Courtesy Northrop & Johnson/)

Sales broker Michael Nethersole at Northrop & Johnson has announced a $100,000 price drop on the 81-foot Ferretti Yachts La Pace.

The new asking price is $2,395,000.

La Pace is a 2012 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She accommodates eight guests in four staterooms, including a king-berth master.

Amenities include a flybridge grill and retractable awning, as well as a foldout transom that becomes a water-level beach club.

Where is La Pace located? She's at Lauderdale Marine Center in Florida.

For more information, visit: northropandjohnson.com

Antarctic Adventure

Launched in 2003, <em>Gayle Force</em> underwent a multimillion-dollar, 20-month refit to prepare for the journey.
Launched in 2003, Gayle Force underwent a multimillion-dollar, 20-month refit to prepare for the journey. (Courtesy Vripack/)

When flag-state officials in the Marshall Islands got word that the owners of the 95-foot Doggersbank Offshore Gayle Force wanted to cruise to Antarctica, they sent Capt. Scott Whittaker a letter, questioning whether a boat so small was even capable of making the trip.

In fact, Gayle Force would become the smallest private yacht with that nation's flag ever to explore so far south, following a 20-month, multimillion-dollar refit to prepare the boat for the journey.

A lot of the work included taking out what the original owners had put in when the boat launched as Patriot in 2003. A Vripack design, she had an original owner who was into what, back then, was state-of-the-art ­technology.

“It was heralded as the most technologically advanced boat under 30 meters,” Whittaker says. “In ‘03, this boat was controlled with touchpads. This guy had to be working with Steve Jobs or something, getting technology that wasn’t available. We’ve spent tons of time undoing and taking a lot of that stuff out.”

Getting the boat’s weight and balance right after several ­decades of modifications also took time, but in the end, the new owners got to do their dream cruise. Whittaker worked with EYOS Expeditions to plan an ­itinerary during a safe weather window, and the owners explored Antarctica for nearly two weeks.

"Yes, if you have more capability, you can go farther or for longer," says Rob McCallum, a founding partner at EYOS. "But even a vessel like Gayle Force, it's going to alter people's perceptions of the world around them. It's not a new place, a new country—it's an entire new continent, and it makes them stop and think about the makeup of the world as we know it. Antarctica has that effect on people."

At the height of Antarctica’s summer—during January and February—the views and wildlife spotting can be spectacular.
At the height of Antarctica’s summer—during January and February—the views and wildlife spotting can be spectacular. (Courtesy Vripack/)

The Pre-Cruise Refit

  • Bloemsma & Van Breemen built the boat as Patriot in 2003.
  • The Derecktor Yard in Dania Beach, Florida, was used for the refit, which took 20 months.
  • The original crew lounge was turned into a third crew cabin to accommodate an ice pilot and naturalist.
  • Helm electronics were upgraded for remote-location cruising.
  • Hull paint was redone.
  • Naiad zero-speed stabilizers were added.
  • About 25,000 pounds of weight (including an oversize anchor chain) was removed from the bow.

World Debut: Palm Beach 70

The Palm Beach 70 leads an 8-model line that starts at <a href="https://www.yachtingmagazine.com/palm-beach-42-beach-baby/">42 feet LOA</a>.
The Palm Beach 70 leads an 8-model line that starts at 42 feet LOA. (Courtesy Palm Beach Motoryachts/)

Palm Beach Motor Yachts has scheduled the world premiere of its new flagship, the Palm Beach 70, at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

The Palm Beach 70 is a flybridge design with three staterooms. There’s a foredeck cockpit that Palm Beach calls a “bowrider,” for guest relaxation similar to that aboard commuter yachts.

Top speed is expected to be 38 knots with a 32-knot cruise speed. Standard power is a pair of Volvo Penta IPS1350s. Draft is 4 feet 3 inches, allowing for shallow-water cruising.

Are optional engines available? Yes. Hull No. 1 is being outfitted with optional 1,000-horsepower Volvo Penta D13s. According to Palm Beach, those engines provide a 24-knot cruise speed and a range of 793 nautical miles at "fast cruise."

For more information, visit: palmbeachmotoryachts.com

LeVen Yachts Debuts 90-Footer

The LeVen 90 can reportedly cruise at 23 knots for 400 nautical miles and has a reported top speed of 26 knots.
The LeVen 90 can reportedly cruise at 23 knots for 400 nautical miles and has a reported top speed of 26 knots. (Courtesy LeVen Yachts/)

LeVen Yachts announced its first model, an all-aluminum 90-footer (27-meter). The yacht is designed and engineered by Dutch design studio Vripack and is constructed by the Van der Valk shipyard, also of the Netherlands.

On the main deck, there is what the designers call the “Great Room at Sea.” With 8 feet of headroom, the Great Room has a centralized galley. The galley is flanked by an aft dining room with a table that accommodates 10 and a forward-facing bar that can fit four barstools. The LeVen 90’s forward windows can be lowered with the push of a button, too.

Aft there is a lanai deck before the sports deck at the stern with a transformer platform for stowing a 15-foot-plus tender and cranes for multiple Jet Skis. The transom garage can handle additional water toys and fishing gear.

Up top is a sun deck with more than 650 square feet of space. It’s approximately 40 feet in length with a centerline helm station. Above the helm station is a 550-square-foot, solar-panel hardtop that helps charge the 90’s lithium-ion battery bank, which powers the air conditioning and allows the yacht to run in silent mode for eight hours during the day and 12 hours at night.

Belowdecks, this yacht has two guest staterooms, a VIP stateroom and the master stateroom, each with en suite bathrooms and accommodating eight; the crew cabins toward the bow fit four.

The 90 is the first yacht in the world to use a Voith Linear Jet propulsion system. The design helps protect the propellers by building them within a streamlined nozzle that’s integrated into the hull. Combined with MTU 12V2000 engines, the 90 can reportedly cruise at 23 knots for 400 nautical miles. The builder says top speed is 26 knots.

Hull No. 1 will be delivered in the Netherlands on Sept. 24. The LeVen 90 will make its global debut at the 60th-annual Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show on Oct. 30.

For more information, visit: levenyachts.com

Sea Trial: Absolute 58 Flybridge

The unorthodox shapes of the Absolute 58 Fly’s windows enhance the yacht’s low-profile lines.
The unorthodox shapes of the Absolute 58 Fly’s windows enhance the yacht’s low-profile lines. (Alberto Cocchi/)

Absolute builds its yachts—which range from a 40 to a 73, covering four lines—in Piacenza, Italy, a city of about 100,000 southeast of Milan. The builder emphasizes two things: innovative Italian design and a sturdy, safe and quiet ride. When I got aboard the Absolute 58 Fly off Staten Island, New York, I wanted to see if she measured up.

As is the norm for Absolute, the main deck has a single, standard layout. The design aids in efficiency during the build process and speaks to the builder’s confidence in its choices. If there’s only one option, it better be well thought out—and it is.

A teak alfresco dining table dominates the cockpit, with bench seating at the transom. In the salon, there’s an aft galley to port with a four-burner Bosch electric cooktop. Above the counter, Absolute has put a homey touch: a teak bottle opener bolted to the refrigerator compartment. The forward part of the galley can be closed off, which at first I thought chopped up the space too much for a boat this size. However, I then realized it was a smart idea, since the divider ­protects the leather U-shaped settee forward of the galley from any splatters.

The Absolute 58 Fly’s optional hardtop offers shade when desired while allowing for a good tan forward.
The Absolute 58 Fly’s optional hardtop offers shade when desired while allowing for a good tan forward. (Alberto Cocchi/)

Across from the galley to starboard is the yacht’s interior dining area: a U-shaped settee for four or five with a fixed-height table. Bench seating for three forward of that adds to the salon seating. Aside from the refrigerator in the after port corner of the space, the salon has nearly 360 degrees of windows. And the seating is high enough to have a good look out of those windows, a hallmark of experienced design.

The 58 Fly’s helm is to starboard with a side door that isn’t a common feature on boats of this size and class, and that aids when docking short-handed. Twin helm seats upholstered in dark, soft Italian leather kept me comfortable and offered good lines of sight. I also liked the upgraded Garmin package with twin screens, and the Volvo Penta joystick control for use at slower speeds.

Solid hardwood steps lead down to the accommodations level, which benefit from an atrium effect thanks to the yacht’s steeply raked windshield. The master stateroom is amidships, down two steps and flooded with natural light thanks to windows flanking either side. There’s a walkaround king-size berth, a 6-foot-tall hanging locker, and 15 cabinets and drawers—a good amount for extended stays aboard.

Note the sliding partition to port that can section off the forward part of the galley for safety, privacy and cleanliness.
Note the sliding partition to port that can section off the forward part of the galley for safety, privacy and cleanliness. (Alberto Cocchi/)

The forepeak VIP stateroom is en suite and nearly large enough to double as a second master. It has an island queen berth as well as a locker of similar size to the master’s. A starboard-side guest stateroom with twin berths that convert to a double has private access to the day head, as well as a 6-foot-tall locker of its own. One of my favorite design elements on the accommodations level is that each stateroom has pocket doors leading to the companionway. They create more space, as swinging doors won’t get in anyone’s way.

Up top on the 58 Fly’s namesake flybridge, a reverse-raked windshield offers wind protection for the twin portside helm chairs, which are just forward of the grill. That grill services a U-shaped dining settee across from it, where light meals and cocktails will surely take ­precedence.

The Absolute 58 Fly has plenty of room to breathe.
The Absolute 58 Fly has plenty of room to breathe. (Alberto Cocchi/)

I stood at the flybridge helm while zipping the yacht around the ­Raritan Bay. Powered by twin 625 hp Volvo Penta IPS800s, the 58 Fly galloped along at a 22-knot cruise speed and 2,650 rpm while her motors burned 53 gph. At that speed, she turned hard over to starboard in two boat lengths, and pirouetted to port in one and a half. With the hammer down, she climbed to a respectable 30.2 knots.

The ride was solid, particularly as I carved her through the steep, sloshing wake of the hard-over turns. Her fiberglass hull is reinforced with a multidimensional grid that helps maintain rigidity. The wooden soles, ceilings and bulkheads are buttressed with fiberglass supports, aiding with structural integrity and sound attenuation. She was, as the builder promises, smooth, solid and quiet.

With the 58 Fly, ­Absolute has a versatile and ­stylish yacht, with onboard ­touches that make her stand out in her class. Those attributes, combined with her ride, produce a model example of her builder’s goals.

Take the next step: absoluteyachts.com

Crossing Oceans

In addition to crossing oceans at a 12-knot pace, this superyacht has a top hop of about 28 knots when the captain wants to stretch her legs.
In addition to crossing oceans at a 12-knot pace, this superyacht has a top hop of about 28 knots when the captain wants to stretch her legs. (Maurizio Paradisi/)

A yacht’s arrival in the Caribbean from the Med in time to celebrate Christmas and New Year’s Eve is nothing unusual. It is uncommon, though, for a yacht to do so on her own bottom, rather than aboard a transport ship. It’s even more ­unusual when that yacht is from Overmarine Group, the company ­behind the Mangusta brand.

Or is it? If the Mangusta name makes you think of the builder’s maxi opens, then yes, you’d never expect one of these fast cruisers to make such a ­journey. But when you realize the yacht in question is Hull No. 1 of the Mangusta Gransport 54 series, then it’s perfectly logical. Gransport is a fast-displacement line, blending good speed with economical range, open-model looks and the comfort of displacement yachts.

El Leon boasts a top speed at half-load around 30 knots, and a fast cruise exceeding 25 knots. Hull No. 1's owner, having owned two Mangusta maxis, was accustomed to getting where he wanted to go quickly. But t­he same quadruple 2,600 hp MTU diesels also allow for efficient performance. At 12 knots, El Leon reportedly sees a range of about 4,200 nautical miles. That's more than enough for a transatlantic crossing.​

<em>El Leon</em> is designed with more than 2,900 square feet of outdoor space, including the infinity pool on the foredeck and the beach club aft.
El Leon is designed with more than 2,900 square feet of outdoor space, including the infinity pool on the foredeck and the beach club aft. (Maurizio Paradisi/)

Since the owner was seeking something for long-range ­cruising, he stepped up to sign a contract when he learned of the Mangusta Gransport line. He was eager to put the hull design, which the builder calls a fast surface-piercing hull, to the test on both sides of the Atlantic. Designed by Pierluigi Ausonio, the yacht has a bulbous bow that pierces the water’s surface without planing. The hull also remains in displacement mode at speeds higher than those of typical displacement yachts.

Paolo Bozzo Costa, El Leon's captain, says he and the owner were happy with the design and engineering package during her first season, last summer in the Med.

“This ­fast-displacement line is very ahead with the technology, style and innovation,” Costa asserts. “It is a silent boat that navigates at 27 to 28 knots in absolute comfort.”

There were no qualms in ­heading for the open Atlantic in early December, to cross to the ­Caribbean on her own bottom. El Leon left the shipyard's dock in ­Viareggio, Italy, on December 1, 2018, making stops in Gibraltar, the ­Canary Islands and Cape Verde for fueling, provisioning and the like. On December 11, she left Cape Verde in her wake. Even with "well-formed swell waves further strengthened by the constant trade winds," Costa says, "the yacht impressed us with her great comfort, stability and performances. I kept an average speed of approximately 14 knots." A few hours after sunset on December 17 in Bridgetown, Barbados, El Leon was setting her anchor in the harbor "with enough fuel in our tanks to relaxedly enjoy our first Caribbean cruise."

The yacht’s teak beach club measures 753 square feet. Note the foldout wings that add to the floor space.
The yacht’s teak beach club measures 753 square feet. Note the foldout wings that add to the floor space. (Maurizio Paradisi/)

The owner can enjoy the Caribbean with leisure areas ­inside and out. El Leon's beach club alone encompasses 753 square feet. It's a sunken day lounge, three steps down from foldout hatches aft and to each side. The sunken aspect is a good idea, as anyone who's had their furnishings splashed by swells can attest. And, the three-sided openings make lounging here all the more enjoyable.

El Leon has more than 2,900 square feet of alfresco space, including an infinity pool with ­hydromassage jets on the foredeck with sun pads, creating an oasis at anchor. A glass sole between the sun pads serves as a skylight for the master stateroom's en suite bath just below.

The owner intends to spend months at a time on board, so El Leon accommodates working vacations. There's a desk in the main-deck master suite, as well as a separate office ­behind a ­sliding door in the foyer. The space is a good example of ­Mangusta's semicustom approach for the Gransport 54, since in the ­original layout, this concealed office was a breakfast nook. For coffee and croissants, El Leon's owner has a table and chairs ­adjacent to a picture window at the suite's entry.

El Leon has already set two records. Not only is she Overmarine Group's first yacht to cross the Atlantic Ocean, but she's also the yard's largest project to date. If the owner keeps on his intended first year's path, then El Leon should set additional records. A trip through the Panama Canal and up the West Coast, cruising to Vancouver and eventually Alaska, is on the list. After that? "El Leon will take us on new exciting voyages across the world," her captain says.

All on her own hull bottom, of course.

The 177-foot <em>El Leon</em> is the first Mangusta to cross the Atlantic Ocean on her own bottom.
The 177-foot El Leon is the first Mangusta to cross the Atlantic Ocean on her own bottom. (Maurizio Paradisi/)Sole-to-ceiling glass creates impressive vistas and brings in light while adding to the yacht’s relatively low-profile aesthetic.
Sole-to-ceiling glass creates impressive vistas and brings in light while adding to the yacht’s relatively low-profile aesthetic. (Maurizio Paradisi/)The Mangusta Gransport yachts—the 54 and the upcoming 45 and 33—have similarly sleek styling, penned by Alberto Mancini.
The Mangusta Gransport yachts—the 54 and the upcoming 45 and 33—have similarly sleek styling, penned by Alberto Mancini. (Maurizio Paradisi/)

Take the next step: mangustayachts.com

Globally Connected

KVH’s V11-HTS uses 1-meter, four-axis stabilization and the mini-VSAT Broadband HTS network to deliver high-speed connectivity to boaters.
KVH’s V11-HTS uses 1-meter, four-axis stabilization and the mini-VSAT Broadband HTS network to deliver high-speed connectivity to boaters. (Courtesy KVH/)

Over the course of three years, a 135-foot Dubois aluminum sloop completed a circumnavigation that included a visit to Antarctica and a deep soak in the high latitudes. Interestingly, her most persistent challenge during this time wasn't plying the high seas, but rather accommodating her increasingly data-hungry guests. The trouble, explains Capt. Mike Lawrence, is that Destination sails with as many as 20 guest-owned wireless devices operating on the yacht's network, which also has to support the vessel's navigational and operational data needs.

The solution, Lawrence says, was to upgrade the yacht’s dual KVH V11-IP satellite-communications antennas to KVH’s V11-HTS antennas, which provide significantly faster service, dual channels and—thanks to their operating frequencies—a massive coverage footprint.

Satellite-­communications systems have existed for decades, but the South Pacific, the high latitudes and handsome swaths of the South Atlantic have long been data dead zones. Historically, this has been due to of a lack of demand, as well as the physical size of the antennas needed to utilize the weak signals that exist on these waters.

Fortunately for owners with a taste for speed and off-piste adventures, KVH’s V11-HTS antenna leverages the company’s mini-VSAT Broadband high throughput satellite (HTS) network to deliver dual-channel, high-performance connectivity from virtually all navigable waters.

Abovedeck, the V11-HTS has a stabilized, 1-meter, Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT) dish delivering maximum download speeds of 20 megabits per second and maximum upload speeds of three Mbps over its high-speed ­channel, plus a second unlimited-use channel in a range of data speeds. The V11-HTS ($74,995) delivers these speeds primarily by operating on the Ku frequency band (12 to 18 gigahertz) while automatically switching to the C frequency band (4 to 8 GHz) to support coverage in remote areas or during inclement weather.

Belowdecks, the system uses KVH's ­latest Integrated CommBox Modem (ICM) black box, housing the modem, network manager, Ethernet switches, storage and Wi-Fi card.

“The V11-HTS is for exploration yachts that sail above Alaska, Asia and the Galapagos Islands, not milk runs,” says Jim George, KVH’s director of global leisure sales, adding that yachts longer than 110 feet are a good match for the technology.

The system’s ability to pipe global, high-speed satellite communications to remote locations is a result of the antenna’s 1-meter dish, four-axis stabilization, and supporting hardware and software, as well as KVH’s mini-VSAT Broadband HTS network. This network is comprised of Intelsat Epic satellites, with additional network capacity coming from SKY Perfect JSAT satellites. Unlike traditional satcom transponders, which typically concentrate moderate amounts of power from single beams across wide swaths, HTS satellite beams have c­onsiderably smaller footprints, onto which the satellite transponder directs significantly more power. In turn, HTS networks allow service providers to focus multiple beams onto data-hungry areas, to deliver additional bandwidth.

All told, KVH’s mini-VSAT Broadband HTS network delivers 25 million additional square miles of coverage compared to the firm’s original coverage map, along with lower per-megabit data costs, and up to five times faster speeds than comparable (and still-­current KVH) equipment. For comparison, KVH’s V11-IP delivers downlink speeds up to 4 Mbps and uplink speeds up to 1 Mbps, while the V11-HTS’ high-speed channel delivers 20-by-3 Mbps speeds (that means 20-Mbps download speed and 3-Mbps upload speed).

The V11-HTS also offers simultaneous dual-channel connectivity courtesy of the system’s 20-by-3 Mbps high-speed channel, and a second unlimited-use data channel that can be configured to deliver 9-by-2 Mbps service. While most owners will reserve the fast channel for A-listers, the second channel is ideal for crew, cloud analytics, data reporting and data-starved grandkids. Moreover, the V11-HTS supports lowest-cost routing and can automatically switch between cellular, satcom and Wi-Fi connectivity, depending on signal availability.

“You could have a crew of eight and six passengers, and no one will see data slowdowns,” George says.

In addition to speed, coverage and an office alibi, KVH also offers powerful network-­management tools to reduce unwanted data burn while bolstering ­cybersecurity. For example, owners can take network-protocol steps to reduce the amount of “invisible” data moving over their networks, such as cloud-syncing ­services and virus and software updates. Rick Driscoll, KVH’s vice president of service development and implementation, says KVH offers optional services enabling network administrators to tourniquet these data bleeds. Users also can access ­KVH-supplied data-use analytics tools, including bar graphs detailing daily and monthly use, and pie charts showing how current data use is being sliced.

As for increased cybersecurity, the V11-HTS’s belowdecks ICM ships with KVH’s “cybersecurity at sea” training program preinstalled. This program represents step one of KVH’s bigger “six-level cybersecurity strategy,” which considers onboard hardware and network ­configurations, and supporting satellite and ­land-based networks, and includes ­access to KVH’s cybersecurity response team.

“­Traffic passes over the satellite in a ­secure, encrypted manner and then through threat-detection devices at the terrestrial network’s edge. The V11-HTS supports all traditional secure protocols [including] HTTPS, [and] as a value-added service, KVH can provide end-to-end ­virtual private-network ­capabilities.”

While the V11-HTS offers faster speeds, lower airtime costs and better ­cybersecurity features than its V11-IP forbearer, the two systems have virtually identical ­hardware, making for an easy upgrade. The antenna delivers ­high-performance connectivity in places where smaller antennas or terminals operating on different frequencies would ­struggle, while offering a serious speed gain.

Performing Pardo

The Pardo 50’s carbon-fiber hardtop can be outfitted with an electrically operated SureShade to cover the cockpit’s dining area.
The Pardo 50’s carbon-fiber hardtop can be outfitted with an electrically operated SureShade to cover the cockpit’s dining area. (Courtesy Pardo Yachts/)

The Pardo 50 is part of a new generation of mega-size walkaround yachts. Instead of a center-­console cabin with a ­portable toilet, there are two ­staterooms, two heads with showers and room for a civilized single-berth crew cabin with its own head.

Is this a long-range cruiser? Nope, but the Pardo 50 is built for long weekends at Bimini, Nantucket or Catalina Island. Even just for afternoon outings with family and friends, there are user-friendly features, including 30-inch-wide teak side decks that lead forward to a 7-foot-6-inch-wide sun pad with pillows, a removable overhead sunshade and pop-in speakers. The bow also features twin couches with a removable table, creating a perfect spot for relaxing after dropping the hidden, retractable anchor.

The teak-clad cockpit is the yacht’s social center, with a six-person wraparound ­settee and a teak table that rises and lowers on a chrome pedestal, and unfolds like origami from cocktail size to a dining table. Just forward is a console with a sink, a two-burner Schott induction cooktop and two fridge drawers.


Name Recognition

Pardo Yachts may be new to North American skippers, but it's been in the European market since 1973. Cantiere del Pardo has built more than 4,000 vessels, including the Grand Soleil line of sailing yachts to 80 feet. Known for its willingness to customize a design, Pardo builds powerboats using vinylester resins with foam-filled carbon-fiber stringers, solid fiberglass bottoms and foam-cored topsides.


All of this is shaded by a carbon-fiber hardtop mounted on sweptback pylons that are as rakish as the single-piece windshield. The hardtop has six darkened moonroofs, and my test vessel had an electric slide-out SureShade to cover the settee and dining area. Abaft that entertainment area was another sun pad, with adjustable backrests.

While primarily a dayboat, the Pardo 50 has a nearly king-size master berth for overnights and weekends on the hook.
While primarily a dayboat, the Pardo 50 has a nearly king-size master berth for overnights and weekends on the hook. (Courtesy Pardo Yachts/)

The sense of volume and light surprised me as I descended belowdecks. The 50’s brightness is aided in part by pale Alpi “timeless oak” paneling and opening ports in each stateroom. The master has 6-foot-3-inch headroom and a nearly king-size berth (80 inches by 65 inches) with walkaround room; it’s 5 feet from the berth to the stateroom door. The en suite head is equally civilized, with a shower measuring bigger than 3 feet by 3 feet. The vessel sink is trendy, and there are Euro-style fixtures. A pullout drawer under the berth, plus hanging lockers with shelving and self-closing drawers in a bureau, provides stowage for a long weekend. This stateroom also has a mini fridge, limiting trips to the galley for a snack.


Forward Thinking

One look at the inverted bow, and an experienced skipper might imagine dings and chips from anchoring, but an entire section pushes outward, carrying a sturdy roller assembly along with a Quick anchor. A video camera tucked in the rode locker, viewed on monitors at the helm, gives the captain a view of what is going down or up. The watertight bulkhead in the chain locker is good protection against collision too.


Like the master, the guest stateroom has over 6-foot-3-inch headroom, a pair of 34-inch-wide berths that slide ­together to form a double, a nightstand, a hanging locker and direct ­access to what doubles as a day head with a shower. No tiptoeing around in the corridor to reach the loo.

The sense of interior volume on the Pardo 50 can be ­deceiving when viewing the yacht from the outside. Belowdecks, there is 6-foot-­­3-inch headroom in the master and guest staterooms.
The sense of interior volume on the Pardo 50 can be ­deceiving when viewing the yacht from the outside. Belowdecks, there is 6-foot-­­3-inch headroom in the master and guest staterooms. (Courtesy Pardo Yachts/)

But this is a yacht for outside living, with the option for a transom garage that holds a 9-foot-6-inch Williams TurboJet 285 tender that reportedly makes about 44 knots. Abaft the garage, which has rubber rollers for the tender’s launch and retrieval, is a hydraulic swim platform wide enough to stow a PWC.

Given that a crew cabin and a ­tender garage are space eaters, I expected the engine room to be minuscule, but it wasn’t. I dropped down the five-step ladder into the engine room and soon realized I wasn’t alone: There was a Volvo Penta service tech at work. And we weren’t cramped.


Proven Power

The Volvo Penta IPS800s on the Pardo 50 are powered by the Volvo Penta D11, a diesel revered for its use in trucks. The marinized version is an inline six-cylinder with twin entry turbos; a supercharger for low rpm response; and a common-rail fuel system for optimized fuel injection. To maximize engine-room space and lower the 50’s profile, the D11s are linked to the pods using jackshafts, a setup that keeps weight amidships.


I won’t tell you there’s standing headroom (it’s 4 feet, 8 inches), but the walkway between the engines is wide, and he had room aft to kneel sideways, which is why I didn’t see him. The engines on this Pardo 50 were the optional twin 600 hp Volvo Penta IPS800s. Standard power is a pair of 435 hp IPS600s, and an in-between option is 550 hp IPS700, but I’d opt for the 600s as on our Pardo 50—in for a penny, in for a pound.

With the engine package, skippers get joystick controls as well as the Volvo Penta Interceptor vertical trim tabs that automatically adjust to the best running angle. This Pardo 50 also had a Quick gyrostabilizer, adding to stability without cramping the engine room, and a 4-kW Cummins Onan generator.

The transom sun pad measures 7 feet, 6 inches wide. High gunwales and 30-inch-wide side decks are designed for safe transit around the yacht.
The transom sun pad measures 7 feet, 6 inches wide. High gunwales and 30-inch-wide side decks are designed for safe transit around the yacht. (Courtesy Pardo Yachts/)

I settled into the bolstered helm seats abaft the dash with twin 16-inch Garmin multifunction displays, and I put the hammer down. The 50 planes at 12 knots, and 38 knots comes up quickly. This Pardo 50 ran from Miami to Palm Beach, Florida, in lumpy Gulf Stream 3-­footers at a steady 30-knot cruise that was comfortable and dry for everyone aboard. I was told that with 23 people aboard and full fuel during the Cannes Yachting Festival, this same Pardo 50 hit 35 knots.

For the dayboat enthusiast seeking performance, panache and the muscle to back it all up, the Pardo 50 is worth a look.

Take the next step: pardoyachts.com

Heesen Delivers Project Boreas

The all-aluminum 164-foot reportedly hit 20 knots on sea trials, which, according to Heesen, exceeds the contractual speed. She’s built of aluminum.
The all-aluminum 164-foot reportedly hit 20 knots on sea trials, which, according to Heesen, exceeds the contractual speed. She’s built of aluminum. (Heesen Yachts/)

Heesen Yachts in the Netherlands has delivered the 164-foot Project Boreas.

During sea trials in the North Sea, Project Boreas reportedly hit 20 knots, which, according to Heesen, exceeds the contractual speed. She’s built of aluminum.

The Fast Displacement Hull Form is by Van Oossanen, also in the Netherlands. Power comes from twin 1,450-horsepower MTU 12V 2000M72 engines. Exteriors are by Frank Laupman of Omega Architects, while Mark Whiteley worked with the owner on interiors.

The Fast Displacement Hull Form is by Van Oossanen, also in the Netherlands. Power comes from twin 1,450-horsepower MTU 12V 2000M72 engines.
The Fast Displacement Hull Form is by Van Oossanen, also in the Netherlands. Power comes from twin 1,450-horsepower MTU 12V 2000M72 engines. (Heesen Yachts/)

Heesen says that inside, there is bespoke loose furniture in all the exterior living areas. The main staircase includes a nickel mesh wall covering by French artist Sophie Mallebranche.

Who acted as the owner's representative on the build? Nigel Ingram, a partner at MCM in Newport, Rhode Island.

Take the next step: go to heesenyachts.com

$1.49 Million Price Drop on 2013 Benetti

The 145-foot Benetti <em>Checkmate</em> is now being offered at $13.5 million.
The 145-foot Benetti Checkmate is now being offered at $13.5 million. (Northrop & Johnson/)

Sales broker Jonathan Chapman at Northrop & Johnson says the owner of the 145-foot Benetti Checkmate has dropped his asking price by $1.49 million, making the new asking price for the yacht $13.5 million.

Checkmate is a 2013 build that's part of Benetti's Vision series. Her interior is done in burl madrona woods and Italian marble. She has a sky lounge that's larger than those on her sisterships and that has a 270-degree dining area that opens to create an indoor-outdoor space.

Checkmate also is the only Benetti 145 Vision with square hull windows in the staterooms, providing for wide-angle views. As many as 12 guests can be accommodated in the yacht's five staterooms, including a master with a private foredeck seating area. Up on the sundeck are an oversized hot tub, a drop-down TV and a custom day head.

Has Checkmate been in the yard recently? Yes. Northrop & Johnson says the yacht has a new paint job from top to bottom, and has completed her five-year class survey.

For more information, visit: northropandjohnson.com

End-of-Season Deal on Mediterranean Yacht Charter

For the mont of September, the 130-foot Heesen <em>Lionshare</em> has a weekly base rate of $94,500, for the month of September in the West Mediterranean.
For the mont of September, the 130-foot Heesen Lionshare has a weekly base rate of $94,500, for the month of September in the West Mediterranean. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons/)

Camper & Nicholsons International says the 130-foot Heesen Lionshare is dropping her weekly base rate by about $22,000, to a new rate of about $94,500, for the month of September in the West Mediterranean.

Lionshare is 1987 build that most recently was refitted in 2017. She accommodates 10 to 12 guests in five staterooms, and she has an outdoor cinema for movie nights under the stars.

<em>Lionshare</em> was refitted in 2017. She accommodates 10 to 12 guests.
Lionshare was refitted in 2017. She accommodates 10 to 12 guests. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons/)

A 32-foot tender is part of the yacht’s toy box, and the crew include a scuba instructor, a Jet Ski instructor and a massage therapist.

Are scuba divers welcome aboard Lionshare? Yes, they are. For divers with certification, the yacht offers gear for as many as five people.

How to book a week on board: Contact a charter broker at camperandnicholsons.com

The First Zeelander Z72 is Delivered

The Zeelander Z72's top speed is about 40 knots.
The Zeelander Z72's top speed is about 40 knots. (Jeff Brown/)

Zeelander Yachts in the Netherlands has delivered Hull No. 1 of its new flagship, the Z72, to an American owner.

Designer Cor D. Rover inked the Z72’s lines, which include an S-shape sheerline, a wider stern than previous models, and more curved surfaces. Owners can choose the yacht’s exterior paint colors, with metallic and diamond-encrusted finishes available.

Noteworthy features include a 110-square-foot swim platform with an optional hot tub aft, as well as a side-entry garage sized for a tender, Seabobs and a WaveRunner (Hull No. 1 carries an 11-foot Williams Turbojet 325; Zeelander says the Z72 can handle a 16-footer). In the salon, there’s a sunroof as well as a retractable window aft for extra natural light and fresh air.

Note the volume in the forepeak master stateroom. That's a king-size berth.
Note the volume in the forepeak master stateroom. That's a king-size berth. (Jeff Brown/)

Belowdecks are three staterooms including a master with a king-size berth.

Power is triple 1,000-horsepower Volvo Penta IPS1350s for what Zeelander says is a top speed of 40 knots.

The owner of Hull No. 1 likes to party: He equipped his Z72 with extra lights and what Zeelander calls "the biggest JL sound system." It can play tunes everywhere on board, including at the swim platform.

For more information, visit: zeelander.com

Mazu's Dashing Dayboat

The Mazu 42 ST has a steeply raked, single-flat-panel windshield that plays a role in her rugged appearance.
The Mazu 42 ST has a steeply raked, single-flat-panel windshield that plays a role in her rugged appearance. (Courtesy Mazu Yachts/)

A Turkish owner ­commissioned the Mazu 42 ST to ferry him from the European side to the Asian side of the Bosporus Strait in Istanbul. The boat’s pronounced military-style exterior surrounds a cabin with a double berth and head, as well as wraparound seating in the bow. Twin 435 hp Volvo Penta IPS600s power this vessel to a top-end speed of 47 knots and a cruise speed of 32 knots.

Whom It's For: You don't need to be a ­Turkish tycoon to own the Mazu 42 ST. Her amenities and performance make her an option for anyone in the market for a dayboat with partial carbon-fiber construction and a 2-foot-9-inch draft that is ­shallow enough for sandbar ­hopping.   ­

Picture  This: It's a roasting summer day in Miami. All you want to do is get away from dry land and escape to Biscayne Bay's soothing aegis. Your Mazu 42 ST bobs at the dock, ready to whisk you and your friends away for a day of fun in the summertime sun.

Take the next step: mazuyachts.com

Custom Line 106 Debuts in Italy

Depending on powerplants, the Custom Line 106 has a reported top speed ranging from 23 to 26 knots.
Depending on powerplants, the Custom Line 106 has a reported top speed ranging from 23 to 26 knots. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

The Custom Line 106 made her debut recently at the Venice Boat Show in Italy.

A planing yacht, the Custom Line 106 was created in cooperation with designer Francesco Paszkowski. Interiors were developed with Paszkowski and Margherita Casprini.

According to Custom Line, the yacht has nearly 2,400 square feet of exterior sole surfaces, all interconnected. The flybridge is connected to the bow through a port [walkway|], while a starboard walkway leads to the cockpit (which also connects to the flybridge, via a stairway). Up on the flybridge, there’s a hardtop with two skylights.

The Custom Line 106's modern interior design is from Francesco Paszkowski and Margherita Casprini.
The Custom Line 106's modern interior design is from Francesco Paszkowski and Margherita Casprini. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

The stern has a Dual Mode Transom system with two sliding doors that cover the stairs when the yacht is underway, creating a cleaner profile.

Inside, the windows in the salon are sole-to-ceiling, and owners can request an electrically opening central window. The support columns serve as housing for lighting, audio and air conditioning systems. There are five staterooms for guests.

What about performance? According to Custom Line, the twin MTU 16V 2000 M86 engines push the 106 to a cruising speed of 20 knots and a maximum speed of 23 knots. Opting for M96Ls increases those figures to 22 and 26 knots, respectively.

For more information, visit: customline-yacht.com

Vripack, Nobiskrug Collaborate on Hybrid Concept

Vripack's 183-foot concept yacht design includes hybrid power and a substantial amount of structural glass.
Vripack's 183-foot concept yacht design includes hybrid power and a substantial amount of structural glass. (Courtesy Vripack/)

The yacht design firm Vripack, in the Netherlands, and the yachtbuilder Nobiskrug, in Germany, have collaborated on a 183-foot hybrid concept yacht.

Styling is unconventional, with inspiration coming from high-end residences in Hong Kong and Dubai, and with a young Middle Eastern or Asian owner in mind. The layout includes four equal-size staterooms on one side, and an open-plan gymnasium on the other, all near an asymmetric hallway.

“What is prime is the flow of people on board, and how the layout is completely derived from giving the maximum user experience,” Vripack co-Creative Director Marnix Hoekstra stated in a press release. “Hallways are shaped wider when you enter them and narrower when you exit, so that it draws you in; the shape invites you on board.”

Structural glass makes up a substantial portion of the concept, including a glass balustrade that runs the length of the yacht.

“It’s a project that takes glass to the next level, optimizing all that the material has to offer,” Joost Mertens, a Vripack designer, stated in the same press release. “All the side walls of the superstructure are made of glass. There is no metal at all. The design is not constrained by any traditional yachting design rules.”

A new power idea: The hybrid propulsion system was developed for the concept. Vripack says the engines are "pancake-like," going flat and wide instead of up, so as not to affect the design of the yacht itself.

For more information, visit: vripack.com

Azimut to Debut Yacht Trio

Azimut Yachts is debuting its Grande S10, Flybridge 78 and Atlantis 45 at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

Azimut’s S10, the builder’s new S class flagship, was designed by Alberto Mancini (exterior) and Francesco Guida (interior), as they reportedly drew inspiration from other mega-yachts, a villa on the Italian Riviera and sports cars. The S10’s bridge was designed in partnership with Naviop and is described as “ultra-high-tech” by the manufacturer. This 94-footer’s construction is made of carbon fiber and glass-reinforced plastic.

Azimut's new S class flagship is designed with four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks.
Azimut's new S class flagship is designed with four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks. (Azimut Yachts/)

The S10 has four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks, and two cabins for crew. Power is twin MTU 2,600 hp diesels. The builder reports a top speed of 35 knots.

The Azimut 78 Fly’s exterior was also designed by Mancini, and Achille Salvagni designed the interior. Within the 78, the salon and dining area are combined into a single space. The area is flanked by sole-to-ceiling windows. There are four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks, and one cabin accommodating up to three crew.

Azimut's Flybridge 78 is the Italian boatbuilder's first flybridge model to be equipped with triple Volvo Penta IPS propulsion.
Azimut's Flybridge 78 is the Italian boatbuilder's first flybridge model to be equipped with triple Volvo Penta IPS propulsion. (Azimut Yachts/)

This is Azimut’s first flybridge model to be equipped with triple Volvo Penta IPS propulsion: Standard power is triple IPS1200s (900 hp), and optional triple IPS1350s (1,000 hp) is available. Top speed is a reported 33 knots. The 78 can cruise up to a reported 26 knots.

Azimut’s Atlantis 45 design was crafted in partnership with Neo Design for both its interior and exterior. The transom garage accommodates an 8-foot tender, and the swim platform can handle a 9-foot-plus tender. Owner and guest staterooms are both full-beam and are separated by the centrally located galley-dinette combo belowdecks.

The Atlantis 45 is making its international debut at the 2019 Cannes Yachting Festival. It can cruise at a reported 28 knots and has a reported top hop of 33 knots.
The Atlantis 45 is making its international debut at the 2019 Cannes Yachting Festival. It can cruise at a reported 28 knots and has a reported top hop of 33 knots. (Azimut Yachts/)

The 45’s power comes from twin Volvo Penta IPS600s (435 hp). The yacht tops out at a reported 33 knots and cruises at a reported 28 knots.

For more information, visit: azimutyachts.com

Owner-Operator Cruiser

Horizon’s V-series yachts, including this V68, can be outfitted with an open or enclosed flybridge.
Horizon’s V-series yachts, including this V68, can be outfitted with an open or enclosed flybridge. (Courtesy Horizon/)

Horizon did many things right with its V68.

Those things start with the salon layout. Sure, the salon is where we entertain, but oftentimes it’s for lounging, and the L-shaped settee faces a 50-inch TV in the corner. It’s not a pop-up or swing-down unit that makes you crane your neck to see it, but instead sits right in front of you, just like at home. Two bucket chairs add to the layout’s flexibility, and a wet bar in the after corner is situated for serving guests in the salon and cockpit.

That cockpit is nearly 11 feet long from the salon doors to the settee. And the salon doors fold—not slide—out of the way, while the half-window abaft the wet bar swings up, further joining the two spaces.

The layout of the country-kitchen-style galley forward reflects the other things we do aboard: eat, drink and hang out. A raised dinette is forward under the windshield. One countertop is to starboard with a Jenn-Air induction cooktop. Another countertop is aft with a high backsplash, and there’s a double-duty island that, by using the tall seats from the dinette, becomes a bar with a foot rail. Whoever is doing the cooking gets to be part of the action in the open living area that stretches 48 feet from the cockpit to the forward dinette, while the skipper has a pantograph door to the portside deck, with gentle steps to the bridge.

Designed by Jonathan Quinn Barnett, naval architect Christian Stimson and the Horizon team, the V68 carries her 19-foot-5-inch beam far forward to a plumb bow, giving her a waterline length of 66 feet, 1 inch, about 3 feet longer than her bigger sister, the V72. The result is increased interior volume, especially in the lower deck accommodations, and particularly in the forward VIP.

The Horizon V68 gives guests numerous places to hang out, whether at the bow, inside or up top on the flybridge.
The Horizon V68 gives guests numerous places to hang out, whether at the bow, inside or up top on the flybridge. (Courtesy Horizon/)

Heading below from the galley, steps lead down to a foyer with a hidden washer and dryer. The foyer has an inlaid pale-oak sole with black China-fir accents, a theme repeated throughout the yacht. The stateroom forward is in an area usually defined (and constrained) by a sharply tapering bow, but with the V68’s plumb bow, there is walk-around space on each side of the queen berth; and there’s a pair of nightstands, which are unusual on a yacht of this length. The en suite head with a shower ­doubles as the yacht’s day head.

Aft, the light and bright master stateroom spans the beam with a centerline king berth, love seat and desk/vanity. The master head is forward to starboard, allowing space for a private companionway from the foyer, and a ­walk-in closet to port.

The guest stateroom is also off the foyer, with twin berths separated by a nightstand. The berths slide together into a double, revealing a previously hidden nightstand. Like the other staterooms, this one has an en suite head.


Read More: Visiting the Horizon Factory in Taiwan


Horizon offers a multitude of alternate layouts, ­including four staterooms on the lower deck, several iterations of the main deck including a lower helm, and an open or closed bridge.

The V68 that I got aboard had a bridge that was a fine choice between enclosed and open: a full enclosure with Strataglass vinyl panels that unzipped and swung up to tailor the amount of indoor/outdoor exposure. A nice touch was the day head aft. Bridge seating included a wraparound settee with a teak table opposite a built-in love seat, and the boat deck aft had room for lounges and seating to taste. Just abaft the dinette were a propane grill, sink and fridge. Some owners may want to use the open real estate on the deck for a tender; Horizon has ­reinforced and prewired the area for a davit.

The helm provides clear sightlines.
The helm provides clear sightlines. (Courtesy Horizon/)

Forward, the bow has two lounges (the forward sun pad flips up) around a table. Aft, there’s a beach club with a wet bar and raised settee under the hydraulically opening transom. The area abaft the engine room can be used for stowage or as a crew cabin with a single berth, head and shower.

Power for the V68 is a pair of 1,135 hp Caterpillar C18 Acert diesels, which push the yacht to just over 25 knots with an 18-knot cruise. Drop the throttles back, and the 9-knot range is more than 800 nautical miles, making the V68 a contender for cruising down-island as well as for making West Coast hops from California to Cabo or Alaska.

Standard equipment includes a pair of 29-kW Onan gensets, ABT-Trac stabilizers, and bow and stern thrusters. The engine room is right: There are even small lights behind the fuel filters, to let owner-operators check for contaminants without juggling a flashlight.

Those kinds of details make it hard not to like the Horizon V68, a yacht that gets so many things right.

Take the next step: horizonyachtusa.com

Best of Grenada

Shadel Nyack Compton grew up playing all around Belmont Estate, now an agritourism destination on Grenada.
Shadel Nyack Compton grew up playing all around Belmont Estate, now an agritourism destination on Grenada. (Zach Stovall/)

As she welcomes more than 30,000 visitors a year to her family’s Belmont Estate on Grenada, owner Shadel Nyack Compton takes great joy in seeing them retrace her childhood wanderings through the verdant grounds of the 17th-century plantation. “My grandparents allowed us to explore every nook and cranny of the estate,” she says. “I loved strolling through the acres of cocoa and nutmeg trees.”

During the past 12 years, Nyack Compton has transformed what was a struggling agricultural concern into an agritourism destination, earning recognition as one of the Caribbean’s top entrepreneurs in the process. The estate indulges the senses with lush gardens, organic chocolates made on-site (a tree-to-bar tour explains the process) and Creole specialties such as callaloo soup served in the farm-to-table restaurant.

“We try to give visitors an authentic experience that embodies Grenadian history, culture, heritage and agriculture all packaged beautifully together,” she says.

  • What drove you to transform Belmont Estate? My grandparents had defied the norm by being the first Indo-Grenadians to own a plantation. Belmont Estate was so rich in heritage and history that I couldn't simply allow it to decay. Reviving it was the best way to honor my grandparents and contribute to the local economy.
  • What does Belmont's motto, "History in the Making," mean to you? The estate evolved out of the institution of slavery, but we have made it into something positive, wholesome and educational, and we are continuing to make history here.
  • What is your favorite flavor of chocolate made at Belmont? The Pure Grenada is a delicate blend of cinnamon, ginger, mace and nutmeg in a 60 percent chocolate bar, so it's very dark with just a bit of sweetness and milk. It embodies Grenada's history as the Spice Island.

Shadel's Must-Do List on Grenada

  • Grand Etang National Park and Forest Preserve (St. Andrew): With its densely forested mountains, imposing lake and mischievous mona monkeys, it is a surreal and majestic experience.
  • Sails Restaurant and Bar (St. George's): It has spectacular panoramic views and extraordinary Caribbean-fusion fare. The Indian tali is yummy.
  • Yolo Sushi and Wine Bar (St. George’s): It has great service and food, with delicious vegan options. It’s in Port Louis, one of the most beautiful spots in St. George’s.

E-Scooter Onboard

The trim (shown in standard “azzurro elettrico” blue) on Vespa’s Elettrica can be customized in six colors.
The trim (shown in standard “azzurro elettrico” blue) on Vespa’s Elettrica can be customized in six colors. (Courtesy Vespa/)

Vespa scooters, which Piaggio makes in Italy, have been icons of European style since the first model premiered in 1946. Countless mega-yachts carry Vespas on deck and in lazarettes for launching onto the roads from Antibes to Monaco. Americans have long loved Vespa’s style too; Hollywood A-listers dating back to Charlton Heston, Audrey Hepburn, John Wayne and Marlon Brando have ridden them on- and off-screen for decades.

Now comes the 21st-century incarnation of the Vespa. Called Elettrica and priced at about $7,200, it is the first silent, electric-powered, zero-carbon-emissions model from the manufacturer. As Vespa puts it, the Elettrica is “a work of art with a technological heart that is born as the symbol of our modern times and the years to come.”

The Elettrica’s power unit can produce continuous juice at 3.5 kW and peak power of 4 kW, allowing for performance that Vespa says is superior to that of a traditional 50cc scooter’s, especially when accelerating or going uphill. Riders have a choice of three modes: eco, power and reverse. In eco mode, speed is limited to about 18 mph, to conserve battery power. Top speed is 30 to 40 mph, as with many traditional 50cc scooters.

Later this year: Vespa plans to introduce a hybrid gas-electric X version of the Elettrica with a range of nearly 124 miles.
Later this year: Vespa plans to introduce a hybrid gas-electric X version of the Elettrica with a range of nearly 124 miles. (Courtesy Vespa/)

The lithium-ion battery recharges with a plug and takes four hours to store a charge that allows for a range of 62 miles—an efficiency that Vespa says will happen without maintenance for 1,000 charging cycles, or about 31,000 to 43,500 miles of use.

In true ­21st-century style, the Elettrica and some of its ­accessories connect to an app. That includes the backpack (shown at left), which has LED piping that can be turned on and off via the app for safety when riding at night. The Vespa app also can be set up to provide push notifications about the scooter’s battery status, statistics on the rider’s 30 most recent trips and number of battery recharge cycles to date.

Digital information for riders is also presented on a 4.3-inch TFT screen, which has four brightness levels and a twilight sensor for switching to night mode. The screen shows typical dashboard information such as battery-charge level and residual range.

Ferretti's New Flybridge

The Ferretti Yachts 720 is an option for owners between the Italian builder’s 670 and 780 models.
The Ferretti Yachts 720 is an option for owners between the Italian builder’s 670 and 780 models. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

Versatile. It's the word that came to mind as I scanned early images of the Ferretti Yachts 720's outdoor spaces.

Take the full-beam teak swim platform and transom garage, for example. Flip up the top half of the garage, and there’s stowage for a couple of Seabobs. Close that door and flip down the whole garage to reveal a sun bed. Add some carbon-fiber poles in the swim platform’s corners, and there’s a sun shade to cool off the space. Additionally, the swim platform accommodates a tender up to about 13 feet in length.

The flybridge, constructed with carbon fiber and composite material, measures just under 330 square feet. The carbon fiber should reduce weight aloft, ensuring a steady ride on ­rougher days.

The salon has a U-shaped settee to port with another settee across. Light-colored fabrics, leathers and contrasting wood tones create a modern feel throughout the interior spaces.
The salon has a U-shaped settee to port with another settee across. Light-colored fabrics, leathers and contrasting wood tones create a modern feel throughout the interior spaces. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)The amidships master measures 215 square feet, spans the yacht’s 18-foot-4-inch beam and includes an en suite head abaft the berth to port. A ­walk-in closet is to starboard.
The amidships master measures 215 square feet, spans the yacht’s 18-foot-4-inch beam and includes an en suite head abaft the berth to port. A ­walk-in closet is to starboard. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

Hardtop options include a ­Bimini, a fixed-window top or a louvered ­version. I’ve seen the louvered setup and ­appreciate how an owner can dial in the degree of light desired, but they all have their merits, depending on the environs.

Extending over the cockpit, the after section of the flybridge can be ­outfitted with loose furniture of the owner’s choice. Forward and to port is a U-shaped dining area beneath the hardtop. Additional sun pads are forward of the helm.

The cockpit’s table is fitted with a bench across the transom and room for four loose chairs, handling about eight guests for dinner. If the evening requires something more formal, there is a dining table for eight, athwartships and to port, one step up from the salon. Nearly 360 degrees of glass extends from the top of the ­salon’s low-slung furniture to the ceiling, ­providing clean views from anywhere on the main deck.

The foredeck lounge can have a teak table between the ­seating spaces. The head of the sun pad pulls up to form a backrest, ­creating an alfresco dining area.
The foredeck lounge can have a teak table between the ­seating spaces. The head of the sun pad pulls up to form a backrest, ­creating an alfresco dining area. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

For owners who are cruising with friends and family, there is a four-stateroom, three-head layout, including an amidships en suite ­master flanked by hullside windows. In the forepeak is an en suite VIP stateroom. Abaft the VIP to port and starboard are guest staterooms with side-by-side berths. They share the third head just ­forward of the starboard-side room.

Standard power for the 720 will be 1,200 hp MAN V-8 diesels. However, Hull No. 1, which should be launching around the time you’re reading this, is getting optional 1,400 hp MAN V-12 ­diesels, providing a projected cruise speed of 28 knots and a 32-knot top hop.

Take the next step: ferretti-yachts.com

Style Redux: 1980′s Yacht Design Is Back?

It feels like the 80s all over again.
It feels like the 80s all over again. (Steve Haefele/)

Now what’s the purpose of that damn thing?” my pal Ed groused. That damn thing was a ­100-foot high-speed yacht burping up a rooster tail the size of Niagara Falls as it careened down the waterway.

“The afterdeck is a bed,” he said. “It’s completely ­impractical.”

“It doesn’t matter,” I replied as the Miami Vice theme song echoed in my head.

I penned a high-speed ride nearly as large as that boat in the 1980s and was summarily taunted by my peers for “­going Euro.” European chic was not so popular stateside back then. Members of the Greatest Generation were still moving the market, and they were driving traditional U.S. brands at low velocities.

“Tasteless,” Ed insisted as he considered the yellowed print of my design. “It looks like a suppository.”

“It seems it’s not the design that is dated, my friend. You are,” I scolded.

In fact, had my design made it to the water, she would seem rather common by today’s standards. Her interior specification called for a herd of Italian leather, a flock of ostrich hide, buckets of lacquer, and tightly woven sisal and wool ground cover. Proper yachts had white topsides in the 1980s, but hers were to be bathed with color: an annoying shade of red, as I recall, or was it yellow? She was aggressively rakish. Her design brief demanded that she look as though she were moving at flank speed while tethered alongside trendy dockside drinking holes.

These days, supersize speedboat technology has been pretty well sorted out. Back then, such a design was pushing the envelope. I infused my effort with high-speed, patrol-boat DNA with the help of a D.C. Beltway subcontractor. Her scantlings called for a tough, longitudinally framed aluminum hull and a lightweight, cored ­composite deck and superstructure. A pair of 16-cylinder diesels ­pumping hundreds of gallons per hour would have yielded 50 knots, and ­surface-piercing props would have provided the maximum visual effect.

Designer shades, white-­linen threads and lace leather ­slippers—those were the days.

“What’s old is new, Ed,” I said. “If I enclose the bridge, add a few winglets and a playpen on the afterdeck, and swaddle the lot in tinted glass, this design will be ready for prime time.”​

“A serious yachtsman would never cruise aboard such a boat,” Ed grunted in disgust.

“Cruise? How mundane. There’s much more to it than that,” I insisted. “Today’s savvy, ­style-conscious investor in yachts is a ­patron of the arts and sciences. These forward thinkers are not wafting through their ­retirement aboard a trawler at idle speed. They’re charging ahead, spawning exciting new innovations in design and ­performance. They are making a ­statement.”

“What happened to your patron of the arts and sciences? Did he ever make a statement?” Ed asked.​

“My client had to spend time ashore,” I explained. “The market was different in the 1980s. Fast-boat fans were more likely to be giving statements than making them. You do recall Crockett and Tubbs?”

Reviewed: Tiara 38 LS

The 38 LS’s fine entry and 20-degree transom deadrise proved solid on the salt.
The 38 LS’s fine entry and 20-degree transom deadrise proved solid on the salt. (Courtesy Tiara Sport/)

Just before this year’s boat shows in Miami, I had the chance to run the Tiara Sport 38 LS, part of a new ­series of outboard-powered vessels from the Michigan boatbuilder. The weather was blustery with spattering rainstorms dimpling Biscayne Bay’s gray chop. It wasn’t great boating weather, but it was great conditions for boat testing.

My test vessel was special because it unveiled a new propulsion package representing a partnership between Volvo Penta and Seven Marine. The optional helm-to-prop system combined Volvo Penta’s Electronic Vessel Control (EVC) with Seven Marine’s beastly 527 hp 6.2-liter V-8 outboard ­motors. Seven Marine brings the horses while Volvo Penta offers DuoProp drives and an amalgam of its “Easy Boating” features, including a Glass Cockpit System, joystick control, dynamic positioning and Easy Connect remote connectivity. (Triple outboards from Yamaha and Mercury ranging from 300 to 400 hp apiece are also available.)

The combination of the DuoProp system with the muscular motors is designed to push the ­growing ­series of monster center-consoles ­coming to market with more efficiency at all speeds. The setup also reduces cavitation, further enhancing performance, according to the manufacturers.

Four. That’s the number of engine options offered for the Tiara 38 LS. This vessel can be outfitted with triple Yamaha F300s, triple Yamaha F350s, triple 400 hp Mercury Verados or twin 527 hp Seven Marines.
Four. That’s the number of engine options offered for the Tiara 38 LS. This vessel can be outfitted with triple Yamaha F300s, triple Yamaha F350s, triple 400 hp Mercury Verados or twin 527 hp Seven Marines. (Courtesy Tiara Sport/)

The 38 LS handled the sloppy conditions in Florida well. A hardtop and single- pane windshield provided shelter from the elements, protecting the three bolster-style helm seats as well as the seating at the after end of the console.

I spent most of my wheel time running the 38 LS at her 30-knot cruise speed, where her range is 276 nautical miles. The boat sliced through the confused 2- and 3-footers while gripping tightly to the bay’s surface during S-turns and while turning hard over in about a boat length and change. When I pinned the throttles, the 38 LS shot up to a brisk 46-knot clip, just 2 knots shy of the 48 knots that Tiara Sport says it’s seen her do. It’s a speed that a center-console in today’s market needs to attain to stay competitive.

The 38 LS has a hardtop with a sunroof over the three helm seats. It extends far enough aft to shade the twin seats aft of the console, which flank a sink and a cutting board.
The 38 LS has a hardtop with a sunroof over the three helm seats. It extends far enough aft to shade the twin seats aft of the console, which flank a sink and a cutting board. (Courtesy Tiara Sport/)

The 38 LS also has the requisite amenities expected on today’s large ­center-consoles. The U-shaped dining settee at the transom is a good place for alfresco meals, while lounge ­seating in the bow is an ideal spot to hang out with sundowners. A full head is inside the console, and there’s a full-size berth for ­overnights.

The Tiara Sport 38 LS could function equally well as a dayboat or as a ­mega-yacht tender. She has performance-boat speed, a sharp profile and good looks without being overly trendy. She is ­unlikely to go out of style anytime soon.

Take the next step: tiarasport.com

Yacht Auction Option

Boathouse Auctions aims to eliminate the question of how many days, months or years it will take to sell a yacht.
Boathouse Auctions aims to eliminate the question of how many days, months or years it will take to sell a yacht. (istockphoto/alexandrbognat/)

Jason Dunbar was losing sleep. His friend owned the 106-foot Broward Altitude Adjustment II and wanted Dunbar, a broker with Luke Brown Yachts, to sell it. Dunbar knew the statistics on Browards: One sells, on average, every 66 days in America. Others had already sold for the year. The sale was likely to take longer than his friend wanted.

The factor of time suddenly became key to the sales equation. While some owners make price the key factor in a sale, hanging onto a yacht for years—and paying the carrying costs until they find a buyer—Dunbar’s friend most valued time. That’s why Dunbar became one of the first brokers to work with Boathouse Auctions, an online service that launched in October.

The site’s creator, Jack Mahoney, says he got the idea from a friend who does online auctions of high-end homes. The concept of an upcoming auction date, he says, creates urgency in the minds of buyers sitting on the sidelines, waiting for an owner to drop the price.

“We’re making an event out of something,” he says. “We solve the problem of time.”

The 106-foot Broward <em>Altitude Adjustment II</em>, built in 2006, was one of the first yachts to sign on with Boathouse Auctions.
The 106-foot Broward Altitude Adjustment II, built in 2006, was one of the first yachts to sign on with Boathouse Auctions. (Courtesy Boathouse Auctions/)

For the Broward—a boat that usually finds buyers, and thus makes for a good bet at auction—it worked. Because of the pre-auction buzz, a buyer came forward with an offer ahead of the sale date. Dunbar and Boathouse Auctions each took a commission, and both the buyer and seller, Dunbar says, felt like they got a deal; the owner saved time, and the buyer saved money.

“We sold it for about 5 percent below fair market value,” Dunbar says. “But, he may have eaten that 5 percent up in the normal bell curve of time. So if I look at how long, on average, it takes to sell a boat right now in America, it may have been a wash.”

How the Auction Process Works

  • A sales broker brings the yacht to the attention of Boathouse Auctions. (The auction house will not work directly with yacht owners.)
  • Promotions go online and a date is set for the yacht's sale at auction.
  • Boathouse Auctions takes a 5 percent commission, on top of the broker's commission. If the yacht sells prior to the auction date, then the seller pays the extra 5 percent to the auction house. If the yacht sells at auction, then the buyer pays the extra 5 percent to the auction house.

Sales So Far

As of early May, Boathouse Auctions had listed three yachts for auction. Two of them—a 106-foot Broward and an 86-foot Stephens—generated so much interest that the yachts sold prior to the auctions taking place.

That’ll Keep an Angler Warm and Dry

Gill's Tournament Pro3L FG100 jacket is made with three layers and has kill-cord attachment loops, an adjustable Vortex hood, and reflective accents. The hood is intended to solve several problems that anglers typically face. Retail price is $349.
Gill's Tournament Pro3L FG100 jacket is made with three layers and has kill-cord attachment loops, an adjustable Vortex hood, and reflective accents. The hood is intended to solve several problems that anglers typically face. Retail price is $349. (Courtesy Gill/)

Gill is not being shy about its new Tournament Pro3L FG100 jacket, calling it "the greatest innovation in fishing jacket design in company history."

The jacket is made with three layers and has kill-cord attachment loops, an adjustable Vortex hood, and reflective accents. The hood is intended to solve several problems that anglers typically face.

“Many of them wear a baseball or trucker style cap, hoodie and then the waterproof shell with the hood up,” Matt Clark, product development director, stated in a press release. “Hoods inflate, caps fly off, so, we got to work on developing a solution. The Vortex Hood has a three-channeled construction with air chutes built into the hood itself. One goes over the top of the head and exits at the rear of the collar, and two vent down the side of the hood and out through the collar. You get a slipstream effect, allowing air to enter the front and exit out the back.”

The effect is similar to what happens in aerospace design, he added.

“With an airplane wing, you get the vortex effect when wind travels faster over the top of the curved surface,” he stated. “So, over the top of the Vortex hood, wind speed accelerates and the air is sucked out the back of the hood.”

The three-layer fabric design has an outer face intended to handle scuffing and tough conditions, in addition to being water resistant. The inner layer is breathable and waterproof, and the layer closest to the skin picks up moisture so it will dry quicker.

What colors does the Gill Tournament Pro 3L FG100 come in? graphite and taupe, both of which are new. Retail price is $349.

For more information, visit: gillfishing.com

A ‘Turnkey Condition’ Hargrave

The 97-foot Hargrave <em>Inevitable</em> was built in 2003 and most recently refitted in 2018. Current asking price is $2,295,000.
The 97-foot Hargrave Inevitable was built in 2003 and most recently refitted in 2018. Current asking price is $2,295,000. (Courtesy Northrop & Johnson/)

Sales broker Whit Kirkland at Northrop & Johnson has listed the 97-foot Hargrave Inevitable for sale, at an asking price of $2,295,000.

Built in 2003 and most recently refitted in 2018, Inevitable is being marketed in "turnkey condition." Accommodations are for eight or nine guests in four staterooms, including a full-beam master.

Up on deck, the flybridge has a hardtop for helm protection, along with built-in guest seating and a barbecue. Dining is on the main deck aft.

According to Northrop & Johnson, the twin 1,400-horsepower Caterpillar engines provide a cruising speed of 16 knots.

How many crew does Inevitable accommodate? There's room for five.

Take the next step: northropandjohnson.com

New Kid In Town

The DutchCraft 56 can reach a reported top hop of 40 knots and can reportedly cruise for 500 nautical miles at 25 knots.
The DutchCraft 56 can reach a reported top hop of 40 knots and can reportedly cruise for 500 nautical miles at 25 knots. (Ben Sampson/)

DutchCraft says its 56-footer is all about ease of use.

The Netherlands-based boatbuilder started with replacing standard, high-maintenance teak with composite teak on the yacht’s decks. Whereas the former can slowly degrade without regular attention, DutchCraft says the latter requires only a high-pressure wash to make it look new again.

Additionally, the DutchCraft 56 has a durable, powder-coated metal rub rail. And the fiberglass hull and superstructure are built via sandwich-infusion construction. PVC coring adds strength without extra weight.

The 56 can be tailored for avid anglers, water-sports enthusiasts, cruisers and more.

For fishermen, optional modifications like a fighting chair, a bait well and a fish box can be added. There are also two benches aft with one locker unit each (19.7 x 5.4 feet; 9.8 x 5.4 feet) on the sides of the main deck that are capable of holding up to 16 full diving sets.

DutchCraft touts its newest vessel as a versatile yacht suitable for fishermen, water-sportsmen or socialites.
DutchCraft touts its newest vessel as a versatile yacht suitable for fishermen, water-sportsmen or socialites. (Jeff Brown/)

Hosting a party? This vessel’s beam is 16 feet 7 inches, comfortably accommodating up to 36 people in its Open version and up to 44 people in its Cabin version.

Lounging space can be found on two sun pads, with an optional, third sun pad available. The first one is on the foredeck, accommodates two people and transforms into a bench as well. On the flybridge, the six-seat dining table (Cabin version) transforms into a sun pad that accommodates four guests. The third and optional sun pad is on the aft deck, accommodates four guests and also converts into a bench.

The DutchCraft 56’s Open version has one forward windshield and seats up to 36 people.
The DutchCraft 56’s Open version has one forward windshield and seats up to 36 people. (Jeff Brown/)

Belowdecks are four staterooms, including a full-beam, en suite master with a 70-inch OLED TV, two other heads, a fridge, a freezer and laundry space with a washer and dryer. Headroom in the master stateroom is 6 feet, 4 inches.

The DutchCraft 56 has a reported top speed of 40 knots. The builder says it can cruise at 25 knots for 500 nautical miles or 750 nm, if owners opt for the extra fuel tank. Standard engines are Volvo Penta IPS-600/950, but there is an option for jet propulsion with John Deere 13.5L 1,500 hp and Doen Waterjets DJ152.

The DutchCraft 56 will debut in September at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

For more information, visit: dutchcraft.com

Heesen Delivers 164-Foot Masa

On a recent sea trial, the 164-foot Heesen <em>Masa</em> exceeded its contracted speed of 23 knots.
On a recent sea trial, the 164-foot Heesen Masa exceeded its contracted speed of 23 knots. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)

Heesen Yachts in the Netherlands has delivered the 164-foot Masa, the latest in the builder's 5000 Aluminum Class series.

During two days of trials in the North Sea, according to Heesen, the yacht “largely exceeded” the contractually obligated speed of 23 knots.

Cristiano Gatto handled interior design, which includes silver leaf ceilings, curved furniture and brushed spruce. Masa accommodates 12 guests in six ensuite staterooms, including the owner's space forward on the main deck.

<em>Masa</em>'s exterior was designed by Frank Laupman from Omega Architects.
Masa's exterior was designed by Frank Laupman from Omega Architects. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)

Frank Laupman of Omega Architects designed exteriors, and the owner chose a white color scheme by Awlgrip.

How does Heesen describe Masa's bow? The yacht has a pelican beak bow with negative sheer.

For more information, visit: heesenyachts.com

Meet the Leopard 53 PC

The Leopard 53PC is slated to debut at the Miami boat shows in February. She's designed for private use, and as part of The Moorings charter fleet.
The Leopard 53PC is slated to debut at the Miami boat shows in February. She's designed for private use, and as part of The Moorings charter fleet. (Courtesy Leopard Catamarans/)

Leopard Catamarans is preparing to introduce the fourth generation of its power catamarans with the Leopard 53 PC, which is expected to be in the United States in time for the Miami boat shows in February.

The model, which will replace the Leopard 51 PC in the builder’s lineup, will be built for private owners as well as for use in The Moorings fleet of charter boats.

“The Leopard 53 Powercat is not just a replacement of the previous model, but an evolutionary change in the Leopard powercat range,” Franck Bauguil, vice president of yacht sales and product development, stated in a press release. “This completely new boat is designed to please the existing Leopard owners and Leopard fans, but also to appeal to the more traditional motoryacht market with a modern, reimagined interior that offers the comforts of home as well as plenty of outdoor entertaining space. Combining this with the smart and economical advantages of catamaran design, she is easy to maintain and operate, and is up to 50 percent more fuel efficient than her monohull motoryacht counterparts.”

The flybridge has space for al fresco dining and for catching rays.
The flybridge has space for al fresco dining and for catching rays. (Courtesy Leopard Catamarans/)The salon takes full advantage of the yacht's 25-foot-2-inch beam. Note the nearly 360 degrees of glass.
The salon takes full advantage of the yacht's 25-foot-2-inch beam. Note the nearly 360 degrees of glass. (Courtesy Leopard Catamarans/)

Maximum range, according to the builder, is 2,000 miles; top speed is 25 knots, and cruising speed is 17.5 knots.

The flybridge has a fixed solid hardtop and seating that offers panoramic views. One level down, the cockpit has a table and walkaround seating. Owners can add an interior navigation station, and can choose a three- or four-stateroom layout with the option for crew cabins.

Where to charter the Leopard 53 Powercat: look for information with moorings.com and leopardcatamarans.com.

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 53'1'"
  • Maximum Beam: 25'2"
  • Draft: 3'2" (half load)
  • Displacement: 41,070 (light ship)
  • Power: 2/370 mhp Yanmar 8LV370 diesels
  • Fuel Capacity: 562 gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 185 gal.
  • Top Speed: 25 knots
  • Cruise Speed: 17.5 knots
  • Range at Top Speed: 342 NM
  • Range at Cruise Speed: 463 NM

Top Fishing Tenders

Builders of today’s center-consoles are finding ways to pack in amenities that used to be available only aboard far larger oceangoing convertibles.
Builders of today’s center-consoles are finding ways to pack in amenities that used to be available only aboard far larger oceangoing convertibles. (Courtesy Boston Whaler/)

Big boats are nice, but ask nearly any yachtsman with a fleet, and he’ll tell you there’s great fun to be had on tenders. With the wind in your hair and a big fish tugging on your line, life doesn’t get much better. Efficient, ­rugged and fun, the fishing tender has come into its own and is now ­available with all kinds of features that used to be the exclusive province of ­larger siblings in the marina. Here are 15 choice picks, new for this season.

Pursuit S 288 Sport
Pursuit S 288 Sport (Courtesy Pursuit Boats/)

The S 288 is now the entry-level model in the builder’s four-hull Sport line, which ranges up to an S 408. At 30 feet length overall, the S 288 has room for many features found on her larger siblings.

  • Thrill of the Chase: With twin 300 hp Yamaha outboards, the S 288 can hit 48 knots. The engine package comes standard with the Yamaha Helm Master steering system and its Set Point feature, which has three modes that let skippers lock in a position, a heading or both.
  • Fully Loaded: Amenities aboard the S 288 include a hullside tuna/dive door, a transom livewell and dual in-sole fish boxes. Seating is aft and up front, so the crew can rest their legs between bouts with gamefish.

Take the next step: pursuitboats.com

Carolina Skiff Sea Chaser 24
Carolina Skiff Sea Chaser 24 (Courtesy Carolina Skiff/)

For more than 30 years, Carolina Skiff has built dependable vessels that are fun to drive and adept at bringing in fish. The builder offers more than 60 models, including its Sea Chaser line, which in itself has four series that range in length from 16 to 27 feet length overall.

  • Multitasker: The Sea Chaser 24 HFC stands out for her versatility; HFC stands for hybrid fish and cruise. She comes standard with features meant to please both types of boaters, including an insulated fish box, fold-down cleats, a stainless-steel anchor chock, LED lighting under the gunwale, a built-in lifting eye, stainless-steel cupholders and more. Capacity is 12 boaters, no ­matter whether they're lounging or wetting lines.

Take the next step: carolinaskiff.com

Edgewater 370cc
Edgewater 370cc (Courtesy Edgewater Boats/)

The Edgewater 370CC butts up against the monster-size center-console class at 37 feet long. The builder categorizes her in her own Yacht class, separate from its Heritage, Center Console and Crossover lines that max out at 32 feet length overall. The 370CC’s horsepower-to-size ratio of 9.2 pounds per horsepower makes her best in her class, according to the builder.

  • Take it to the Edge: The 370CC's options for customization ­include ­multiple hull colors, a 70-gallon in-transom livewell, a Garmin electronics package and a Fusion stereo system.
  • Speed Thrills: With triple 300 hp ­Yamaha outboards, the Edgewater can hit a top-end speed of 56 knots, according to the builder.

Take the next step: ewboats.com

Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence
Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

Ocean Alexander has long had a reputation for constructing stout, bluewater-cruising motoryachts. Now the builder is applying that heritage to the center-console market with the 45 Divergence.

  • Divergent Thinking: Fit and finish, and in particular woodwork and leather stitching, are on par with the builder's motoryachts. Owners can customize each hull with more than 400 cosmetic variations.

Take the next step: oceanalexander.com

Grady-White Canyon 456
Grady-White Canyon 456 (Courtesy Grady-White/)

Grady-White has a sizable new flagship: the Canyon 456. The builder says that in designing this boat, it wanted to “reimagine the luxury sport-fishing yacht,” with the widest beam (14 feet) in its class allowing for literal boatloads of amenities and features on board. The 45-foot-long center-console displaces a cool 24,500 pounds sans engines.

  • Great White: The Canyon 456 is fitted out with cockpit boarding doors to port and starboard, a 459-quart insulated freezer box, a Seakeeper 6 gyrostabilizer, cushioned bow seating with ­backrests, and an enclosed head with a sink and shower (inside the console). The galley has Corian countertops and stainless-steel drawers, along with vertical rod stowage. The V-berth converts electromechanically from a bed to seating with a table, near a 32-inch TV and more rod stowage.

Take the next step: gradywhite.com

Scout 530 LXF
Scout 530 LXF (Courtesy Scout Boats/)

The Scout 530 LXF is the builder’s new flagship. Early inquiries left the builder expecting to be sold out for the first year after Hull No. 1 made her debut.

  • Vroom! She can have an array of engine setups, with four, five or six Mercury or Yamaha outboards up to 2,700 total horsepower. The blistering top-end is reportedly 65 knots.
  • Inside and Out: Scout worked with Fort Lauderdale-based Genesis Interiors on the European-style interior, with ideas taken from larger yacht builds. Other interesting touches include electrically raised rocket launchers and double hydraulic swim ­platforms that open to port and starboard. The 530 LXF also comes with a concierge: Company Capt. Josh Slayton delivers each 530 and makes sure each owner is comfortable with the boat.

Take the next step: scoutboats.com

Valhalla v37
Valhalla v37 (Courtesy Valhalla Boatworks/)

It was only a matter of time. Viking Yachts has been a dominant player in the fish-boat market for years, and now has rolled out Valhalla Boatworks, its foray into the burgeoning center-console sector.

  • Hero Status: Viking collaborated with Michael Peters Yacht Design to create this 36-foot-9-inch boat, which has a gently sloped sheerline. The boat can have twin, triple or quadruple outboards up to 1,200 hp. Customized installations of Seakeeper gyrostabilizer systems leave room for stowage, systems and more. A transom livewell, in-sole fish boxes and rod holders help to bolster this vessel's fishing cred, while the stepped hull should provide an airy ride with a firm grip on the sea.

Take the next step: valhallaboatworks.com

Solace 345
Solace 345 (Courtesy Solace Boats/)

Solace is a new boat company whose first model is the 345. Note the vessel’s unorthodox transom, which juts out between the twin Yamaha outboard engines, creating 5-foot flush access that leads to a hydraulically operated dive door. Just forward of there, to port and starboard, are ­folding benches that seat two people apiece. There’s also a three-person ­retractable bench that extends from the ­workstation.

  • Bug Out: Owners can choose an ­optional second workstation with a "folding buggy top" for protection from the elements.
  • Big Plans: The Edgewater, Florida, builder has 16 acres of space and plans to roll out a full line of models behind the 345. So get ready to say hi to the new guy.

Take the next step: solaceboats.com

Boston Whaler 210 Montauk
Boston Whaler 210 Montauk (Courtesy Boston Whaler/)

The 210 is the new flagship in Boston Whaler’s Montauk line. Like all Whalers, she’s “unsinkable,” and is also built for hose-and-go use, so owners can maximize their time on the water.

  • Whale of a Time: The 210 Montauk comes standard with a 150 hp Mercury FourStroke outboard and a galvanized-steel trailer with LED lighting and a swing tongue. Fishing options include rod holders, tackle drawers and a 30-gallon livewell; the optional fishing package adds a host of angling amenities.
  • Cruising Cred: Optional bow seating should make for an optimal place during sunset cruises. Five gelcoat colors are available for the hull while a teak package lets owners class up the joint.

Take the next step: bostonwhaler.com

Coastal Craft 33 Express
Coastal Craft 33 Express (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)

The Coastal Craft 33 Express is based on the Pacific Northwest builder’s 33 Profish. Like her sistership, the Express version is trailerable, has about 81 square feet of cockpit space to wet a line, and has two berths for spending the night on the hook in a favorite anchorage.

  • Ready To Run: The 33 Express can cruise at 30 knots for 400 nautical miles and hit 40 on the pins, according to the builder.

Take the next step: coastalcraft.com

Nor-Tech 390 Sport
Nor-Tech 390 Sport (Courtesy Nor-Tech Boats/)

Nor-tech has always toed the line between center-console and pure speedboat, and the 390 Sport is no exception. She has a scorching top-end of 70 knots with triple outboard Mercury 400R racing engines, according to the builder.

  • Fast Fishing: The 390 Sport has two tuna doors, an in-transom livewell and an array of rod holders dotting her gunwales. Garmin is a Nor-tech partner for outfitting helm electronics.
  • Have a Seat: U-shaped forepeak seating and twin lounges are forward of the console, giving guests and crew a place to stretch out in the sun. JL Audio can design the stereo setup of the owner's choice, and Nor-tech works with Lumishore on underwater lighting packages.

Take the next step: nor-techboats.com

World Cat 280DC-X
World Cat 280DC-X (Courtesy World Cat/)

World Cat says it has 80,000 customers aboard its boats worldwide, with the newest model from its 140,000-square-foot facility in North Carolina ­being the dual-console 280DC-X. It’s an ­evolution of the 280CC-X.

  • Cat Fish: With an optional angling package—­including a 20-gallon livewell and five ­hardtop-mounted rocket launchers—the World Cat becomes quite the fishing machine. Top speed for heading to the offshore fishing grounds is just shy of 40 knots, according to the builder.
  • Lounging Around: This catamaran has U-shaped seating in the bow with a filler cushion that creates a sun pad. Transom seating offers some protection if rougher weather begins to kick up.

Take the next step: worldcat.com

Belzona 32CC Tournament
Belzona 32CC Tournament (Courtesy Belzona Boats/)

Belzona bills its 32CC Tournament ­Edition as “the ultimate fishing machine.” The boat has full walkaround space and an army of rod holders. She also can be tricked out with outriggers, a Garmin electronics package and a marlin tower for better sightlines when chasing the big fish that this baby is meant to hunt.

  • Power to the People: The base-model 32CC is offered with twin 300 or 350 hp Mercury Verado outboards (and optional joystick controls). The Tournament ­Edition can jack up the power with a pair of 400 hp outboards.
  • In the Zone: The Belzona 32CC Tournament Edition has a full head with a shower (in the console) and wraparound seating in the forepeak.

Take the next step: belzonaboats.com

SeaVee 290B
SeaVee 290B (Courtesy SeaVee Boats/)

SeaVee constructed the 290B with a composite-cored hull to reduce weight while retaining a stiff, strong and quiet ride. The boat’s relatively small size also gives ­owners the ability to trailer her.

  • Deep-V: The 290B has a deep-V hull with 25 degrees of deadrise at the transom and a fine entry. Speeds range to 60 knots. Draft is just 20 inches, allowing for some ­skinny-water fishing too.

Take the next step: seaveeboats.com

Intrepid 345 Nomad
Intrepid 345 Nomad (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

Intrepid bases many of its designs on customer feedback, and that’s what happened with the 345 Nomad. Its composite T-top has a full-height wraparound glass windshield for protection against sun and spray. Owners can choose from two console options: a side entry with that standard T-top, or a front entry with the builder’s optional, traditional, aluminum T-top. Standard features include an inward-opening dive door, a fold-under swim ladder, an insulated fishbox and an integrated motor bracket for twin or triple outboard-engine configurations. Rod lockers are forward to port and starboard. Fender stowage and transom storage wells are also standard.

  • Go Fish: The 345 Nomad has six rocket launchers on the after end of her hardtop and can be fitted with outriggers.

Take the next step: intrepidpowerboats.com

Top