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DutchCraft Delivers Custom DC56

The salon has ocean views in all directions.
The salon has ocean views in all directions. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

DutchCraft in the Netherlands has delivered a custom DC56 to an owner in South Florida. The owner plans to offer the yacht for charter there and in the Bahamas.

The yacht’s name is Go-N-Hot, which is the same name as owner Matt Kutcher’s special-effects company for movie, television and other productions.

“I say ‘going hot’ on set to let everyone know an explosion is about to happen,” Kutcher stated in a press release.

The DutchCraft DC56 <i>Go-N-Hot</i> has a top speed of 32 knots.
The DutchCraft DC56 Go-N-Hot has a top speed of 32 knots. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

Amenities that Kutcher requested include PWC stowage on the bow, paddleboard stowage on the flybridge, numerous rod holders for fishing, and an onboard dive compressor. DutchCraft also added extra bottle stowage, built-in tackle boxes, Seabob charging stations, and a custom vanity in the master stateroom.

Ready to roam: Go-N-Hot has twin Volvo Penta IPS950s. According to DutchCraft, the yacht’s top speed is 32 knots. At cruise speed, range is reportedly 840 nautical miles.

Take the next step: go to dutchcraft.com

World’s Largest Aluminum Sailing Yacht Completes Sea Trials

<i>Sea Eagle II<i/> can reportedly make more than 21 knots.
Sea Eagle II can reportedly make more than 21 knots. (Courtesy Royal Huisman/)

Royal Huisman in the Netherlands says that following Covid-19 delays, the sea trials have now been completed for the 266-foot Sea Eagle II, the world’s largest aluminum sailing yacht. Delivery to the owner is now scheduled for July.

Sea Eagle II is designed by Dykstra Naval Architects and Mark Whiteley. She has three carbon Rondal masts and booms and reportedly can achieve speeds faster than 21 knots.

The rig can carry more than 37,600 square feet of sail area that’s controlled by 34 winches. The largest winches are capable of an 18-ton pulling load, according to the builder.

At 266 feet LOA, Sea Eagle II the world’s largest aluminum sailing yacht.
At 266 feet LOA, Sea Eagle II the world’s largest aluminum sailing yacht. (Courtesy Royal Huisman/)

Who is the owner of Sea Eagle II? The same person who owns the 142-foot sloop Sea Eagle that Royal Huisman built in 2015.

Take the next step: go to royalhuisman.com

Meet the Pearl Yachts 62

The Pearl Yachts 62 is powered with twin Volvo Penta IPS diesels, ranging from 725 hp to 900 hp apiece.
The Pearl Yachts 62 is powered with twin Volvo Penta IPS diesels, ranging from 725 hp to 900 hp apiece. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

I stared at the pearl 62′s image above, switching back and forth between placing my thumb over the flybridge and then removing it. The exercise, to my eye, displays lines that appear inspired by an express cruiser—but with the added function of a flybridge. That flybridge does not distract from her sporty look and instead flows with the yacht’s superstructure.

Bill Dixon, who also penned the builder’s 80- and 95-footers, did the exterior design and naval architecture on the Pearl 62. Dixon drew motion into the yacht’s profile via the raked window forward, the curved glass reaching aft in the superstructure and the fiberglass line between the panes flanking the salon. That line rises up and aft, similar to the look of a wake breaking behind the transom. The flybridge hardtop’s supports lean forward, contrasting the sweptback look and adding sleekness to the yacht’s appearance. Hullside glass extends the profile visually, while adding light and views in the four-stateroom, three-head layout belowdecks.

The Pearl 62 can be ordered with a crew cabin aft, but most US owners will likely want a tender garage for a PWC.
The Pearl 62 can be ordered with a crew cabin aft, but most US owners will likely want a tender garage for a PWC. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

There is a full-beam master stateroom amidships with an en suite head, two chairs and a table to starboard, and a private entrance from the salon. This stateroom’s volume is possible because the yacht’s Volvo Penta IPS diesels are farther aft than straight-shaft powerplants, increasing living space. There is a forepeak VIP with an en suite head. Abaft to port and starboard are guest staterooms with double berths.

The flybridge has a helm console to starboard with a sun pad to port. There is U-shaped seating abaft the sun pad, and two L-shaped seats are far aft.

Power options are IPS950s (725 hp), IPS1050s (800 hp) and IPS1200s (900 hp). Preliminary sea trials showed a reported top hop of 32 knots.

Interior designer Kelly Hoppen says she went with a neutral color palette for the Pearl Yachts 62, with a focus on “­creating a sense of calm” and “luxury comfort.” The builder says many of the materials, such as the veneers and marbles, were chosen for their aesthetics as well as their weight.
Interior designer Kelly Hoppen says she went with a neutral color palette for the Pearl Yachts 62, with a focus on “­creating a sense of calm” and “luxury comfort.” The builder says many of the materials, such as the veneers and marbles, were chosen for their aesthetics as well as their weight. (Courtesy Pearl Yachts/)

The Pearl Yachts 62 might be the builder’s smallest model, but it has all the function and flair of her bigger siblings.

Take the next step: pearlyachts.com

Reviewed: Fountaine Pajot’s MY40 Powercat

The cockpit, flybridge and foredeck create three distinct alfresco social zones.
The cockpit, flybridge and foredeck create three distinct alfresco social zones. (Courtesy Fountaine Pajot/)

Common wisdom says catamarans don’t like short, choppy seas, especially the kind of maelstrom created when a north-running Gulf Stream meets a leftover northerly breeze. “Washing-machine sea” doesn’t quite describe it.

But the Fountaine Pajot MY 40 power catamaran ate up the confused sea and then asked for more. Running bow on, beam to the lumps, this cat just licked her paws and seemingly smirked, “That’s all ya got?”

The MY 40 I got aboard will be a liveaboard cruiser for an experienced couple. Frankly, I envy them. French charter cats can lean toward easy maintenance at the expense of style, but the MY 40 surprised me with both. It has tactile fabrics, including on the settees in the salon, and lots of solid, light-oak joinerwork.

The salon is the living room for liveaboards, and it’s also home to the lower helm with a double-wide seat and a media room that has a pullout TV abaft the galley.

That galley is definitely liveaboard, with a full-height refrigerator/freezer, double sinks, a microwave/oven, a cooktop and an optional dishwasher. There’s also generous counter space and stowage.

While the convertible sun pad on the bridge becomes a helm companion seat, the foredeck of the MY 40 also has multiple uses, including wraparound seating with a removable table for a quiet lunch and a pair of lounges with tilting backrests for enjoying a breeze.
While the convertible sun pad on the bridge becomes a helm companion seat, the foredeck of the MY 40 also has multiple uses, including wraparound seating with a removable table for a quiet lunch and a pair of lounges with tilting backrests for enjoying a breeze. (Courtesy Fountaine Pajot/)

What makes this boat a particularly desirable liveaboard is the owners’ stateroom, which is full-length with 6-foot 7-inch headroom. Inside is an athwartship berth about 6 inches narrower than a king. It faces a hullside window for great views. Forward, the head has a walk-in stall shower opposite a hanging locker, and the electric toilet is in an enclosed compartment.

The starboard hull has guest staterooms fore and aft, although the owners of the MY 40 I got aboard chose to replace the double berth forward with upper-lower bunks for youngsters.

The flybridge is comfortable underway or at anchor, with the helm behind a Venturi windscreen. A companion seat folds into a sun pad, and just aft are a sink, grill, fridge and ice maker.

Standard power is a pair of 300 hp Volvo Penta IPS400 diesels; 370 hp IPS500 diesels are optional. On flat water, the MY 40 hit 24 knots.

After getting to a gunkhole of choice, owners can lower the hydraulic swim platform into the water, creating a teak beach. Owners can also launch the 10-foot-8-inch tender with room to spare on all sides.

Thoroughly likable and refined, the Fountaine Pajot MY 40 could make many yachtsmen cat lovers.

Take the next step: fountaine-pajot.com

Cruising with Sabre

True East on the hook in Kosterhavet National Park in Fjällbacka, Sweden.
True East on the hook in Kosterhavet National Park in Fjällbacka, Sweden. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)

When dan prigmore and Marcia Hayes pulled their Sabre 48 True East up to a hand-operated lock in Norway’s Telemark Canal this past July, they received an extremely enthusiastic greeting from the senior lockmaster.

“He asked: ‘Can I come on the boat and get a picture with your flag? I’ve been at this job 16 years, and this is the first American boat I’ve ever seen,’” Prigmore says.

Since launching True East in 2012, the veteran cruising couple from Coconut Grove, Florida, has taken great pride in voyaging beyond the beaten cruising waypoints. They’ve logged more than 35,000 miles on True East, exploring nautical nooks and crannies from Alaska to the Canadian Maritimes, Sardinia to Sweden, with Hayes’ Chihuahua-terrier rescue dog, Lola, along for the ride and the frequent company of friends and family.

“When we first met and Dan asked me how I felt about boats, I said, ‘Let’s put it this way: My absolute favorite thing is to be either in the water, on the water, next to the water, or coming and going to the water,’” Hayes says.

These adventurous cruisers have traveled more than 35,000 nautical miles to locations such as Lourdes, France.The “Men at Sea” in Esbjerg, Denmark.Marcia and Lola exploring in Canillo, Andorra.The yacht’s shallow air draft comes in handy while exploring the French canals.Stopping by a glassblowing shop in Copenhagen, Denmark.Going ashore to stretch their legs, the couple gets a chance to take in views like this one in Ordino, Andorra.Visiting the Natural History Museum Basel in Switzerland.Slow cruising through Nordhouse, France.It’s a tight fit as True East exits a tunnel while cruising French canals.A quiet morning on the canal.Exploring museums in Luxembourg.A waterfront view in Smögen, Sweden.

A lifetime boater, Prigmore commuted for a while from his summer home in Hull, Massachusetts, to his office in Boston aboard Johanna, a 30-foot twin-engine Hacker-Craft christened with his mother’s middle name. He also logged 30,000 miles on Canim, a 1930 Ted Geary-designed 96-foot motoryacht he had restored. After Prigmore met Hayes, the couple cruised along the Maine coast and elsewhere aboard Prigmore’s 32-foot Legacy, True South.

“We spent two summers up in New England, where Dan is from and has lots of friends who have boats,” Hayes says. “Everyone kept asking us, ‘When are you going to buy a place up here?’ But Dan and I both agreed we couldn’t decide on one place. What we really wanted was to be able to cruise on a boat but have company join us. That was the inspiration for buying a two-cabin boat.”

They made the rounds of boat shows in the United States and Europe, checklist in hand. “We wanted a boat with two equal cabins with en suite heads and a separate shower,” Prigmore says. “It had to be under 50 feet, run-and-hide capable, American-made with classic lines. The Sabre 48 was exactly what we wanted.”

The clincher was the lower stateroom, whose head serves as a day-head for guests and whose sleeping area becomes stowage during long voyages. That stateroom also holds a washer and dryer. They converted the queen berth to a twin and fitted the extra space with a wire-rack stowage unit. Foldable bikes and an inflatable kayak stay down there, as do a refrigerator for food stowage—second to the one in the galley—and an average of 10 cases of wine.

Their favorite scenery, by far, has been during their Alaska voyages, where they’ve even scooped up some ice to mix glacial martinis while watching the wildlife.

“If you get up into Tracy Arm at the right time of year, the seals give birth on the ice floes to keep their pups away from the orcas,” Prigmore says. “You have a ton of eagles overhead and whales nudging around the edges. You’re floating in ice. It’s unbelievable.”

While True East’s 550 hp Cummins diesels provide the power Prigmore needs in rough crossings—such as from Newfoundland to Cape Breton in Canada, and from Italy’s Sardinia to Spain’s Mallorca in the Mediterranean—the couple prefers to keep things in a lower gear.

“We like to nudge our way through tight passages where you have to pay attention, but it’s more interesting than going 50 miles per hour 24/7 offshore,” Prigmore says.

They were charmed by the Mediterranean’s Rhone-Rhine Canal, where they just barely squeezed under the bridges and through as many as 25 locks in one day.

“I’d swear Marcia walked halfway across France,” Prigmore says. “There was usually a beautiful path next to the canal, so she’d walk with the dog, Lola, while I drove the boat.” As she strolled past abandoned lockmasters’ houses, Hayes picked sun-ripened pears, peaches and plums.

True East’s next plum itinerary, starting in May, will depart from Sweden and head east to the Baltics, then explore the coast of Poland and the Mecklenburg Lakes region of Germany. Prigmore, Hayes and Lola expect to be together at the helm, keeping True East on course, for their next great adventure.

Gallery: Cruising with Sabre

These adventurous cruisers have traveled more than 35,000 nautical miles to locations such as Lourdes, France.
These adventurous cruisers have traveled more than 35,000 nautical miles to locations such as Lourdes, France. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)The “Men at Sea” in Esbjerg, Denmark.
The “Men at Sea” in Esbjerg, Denmark. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)Marcia and Lola exploring in Canillo, Andorra.
Marcia and Lola exploring in Canillo, Andorra. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)The yacht’s shallow air draft comes in handy while exploring the French canals.
The yacht’s shallow air draft comes in handy while exploring the French canals. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)Stopping by a glassblowing shop in Copenhagen, Denmark.
Stopping by a glassblowing shop in Copenhagen, Denmark. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)Going ashore to stretch their legs, the couple gets a chance to take in views like this one in Ordino, Andorra.
Going ashore to stretch their legs, the couple gets a chance to take in views like this one in Ordino, Andorra. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)Visiting the Natural History Museum Basel in Switzerland.
Visiting the Natural History Museum Basel in Switzerland. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)Slow cruising through Nordhouse, France.
Slow cruising through Nordhouse, France. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)It’s a tight fit as True East exits a tunnel while cruising French canals.
It’s a tight fit as True East exits a tunnel while cruising French canals. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)A quiet morning on the canal.
A quiet morning on the canal. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)Exploring museums in Luxembourg.
Exploring museums in Luxembourg. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)A waterfront view in Smögen, Sweden.
A waterfront view in Smögen, Sweden. (Courtesy Dan Prigmore/)

Deals on Bahamas Yacht Charter

<i>Fabulous Character</i> accommodates 10 guests at a current weekly base rate of $135,000.
Fabulous Character accommodates 10 guests at a current weekly base rate of $135,000. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons/)

Several charter yachts are offering reduced rates for Bahamas yacht charter as the Covid-19 pandemic eases up, with the islands now estimating a broader tourism reopening date of July 1.

Camper & Nicholsons International says the 138-foot Holland Jachtbouw Fabulous Character is giving a 10 percent discount off the usual weekly base rate of $150,000. The deal is good on charters booked through September 15.

Fabulous Character is a 2010 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms, and charters with nine crew.

The 130-foot <i>Far Niente</i> has dropped its weekly base rate for the Bahamas to $99,000.
The 130-foot Far Niente has dropped its weekly base rate for the Bahamas to $99,000. (Courtesy Churchill Yachts/)

Another yacht offering a Bahamas yacht charter deal is 130-foot Westport Far Niente, which is part of the fleet at Churchill Yacht Partners. She has dropped her weekly base rate from $115,000 to $99,000, and is offering postponements of up to six months in case of future Covid-19 restrictions.

Far Niente accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms, four of which can be set up with king berths for couples wanting to charter together and not have to sleep in twin beds.

Isn’t the Bahamas already reopened? The islands began phase one on June 15, allowing private jets and yachts to arrive in the island and test out new procedures. Phase two for more tourism is expected to begin on July 1.

For more information, visit: camperandnicholsons.com and churchillyachts.com

Oscar Collision-Avoidance System Now Available

Oscar uses artificial intelligence to detect obstructions in the water.
Oscar uses artificial intelligence to detect obstructions in the water. (Courtesy Oscar Systems/)

Oscar is an automated monitoring system whose “eyes” are thermal and color cameras that feed information to a “brain” powered by artificial intelligence. The system was developed in cooperation with offshore-racing teams, and is being marketed for use aboard everything from day cruisers to superyachts.

The system detects floating objects to reduce the risk of a collision. “Non-signaled crafts, sleeping whales, wooden logs, containers and debris or other floating objects are detected, which neither the crew nor the radar or sonar system will detect,” according to the company. “Owners, skippers and crews benefit from increased safety as well as more comfort and peace of mind during navigation, especially at night.”

The developers say the goal for the Oscar system is to connect it to a boat’s autopilot, to automatically change the boat’s trajectory to avoid a collision risk.

Can Oscar’s data be tied into a multifunction screen? Yes. The Oscar Advanced Series also can be integrated with a boat’s communications bus. 

Take the next step: Go to oscar-system.com

Coming Soon: Downeast-inspired Custom 68-foot Yacht

This Doug Zurn-penned 68-foot Downeast-inspired yacht is projected to make 38 knots.
This Doug Zurn-penned 68-foot Downeast-inspired yacht is projected to make 38 knots. (Courtesy MCM Newport/Doug Zurn/)

MCM in Newport, Rhode Island, has been appointed the owner’s representative for this 68-foot Doug Zurn design that Delta Marine is building in Seattle.

The owner, according to Peter Wilson of MCM, has had several production boats and wants to upgrade the quality of his next Downeast-style express cruiser to a superyacht standard. “The only way to do that was with a custom design and a bespoke shipyard,” Wilson stated in a press release.

The bridge deck has room for cocktails with friends and informal meals.
The bridge deck has room for cocktails with friends and informal meals. (Courtesy MCM Newport/Doug Zurn/)

Construction will be infused epoxy, e-glass and Corecell/Airex for a displacement of just over 30 tons at half-load. Seakeeper stabilizers and Humphree interceptors will provide ride stability.

Accommodations for six guests will be belowdecks, with three staterooms and two heads.

The yacht is expected to be completed in 2021.
The yacht is expected to be completed in 2021. (Courtesy MCM Newport/Doug Zurn/)

When is the express cruiser scheduled to be delivered? During the second half of 2021.

For more information, visit: mcmnewport.com

A Decade of Growth for Marine Electronics

High-latitude cruising is a perfect example of times when mariners need increased levels of situational awareness, both above and below the waterline.
High-latitude cruising is a perfect example of times when mariners need increased levels of situational awareness, both above and below the waterline. (Anastasia Taioglou/)

It’s hard to believe, but this year marks my 10th anniversary covering electronics for Yachting. To celebrate, I thought it would be fun to compare two leading marine-electronics technologies—radar and sonar—and see how products that were available during my freshman year have evolved over a decade.

And to do that, we have to go back a bit further in time. While it’s easy to point at the atomic bomb as the technology that decided World War II, historians acknowledge that it was the invention of the cavity magnetron by British scientists—which lead to creating small, field-deployable radio-detection and ranging systems—that truly devastated Axis forces. Raytheon created the first recreational radar following WWII, and yachtsmen soon embraced the technology.

Radars generate pulses of radio-frequency energy and transmit them from a rotating directional antenna, forming each pulse into a narrow wedge. This energy travels at the speed of light and bounces off targets before returning to the antenna as an echo. Radars calculate the range to a target by measuring the time difference between when a signal is transmitted and when its retuning echo arrives; bearing is determined by measuring the radar antenna’s angle when the return is received.

Radar manufacturers started employing digital signal processing in the early to mid-2000s to better differentiate signal from noise.

“Ten years ago, we offered radar with DSP, but the front-end [signal] was still analog,” says Jim McGowan, Raymarine’s Americas marketing manager. “Instead of [traditional] analog filters, we fed the full [analog] signal to the [DSP] computer.”

Other manufacturers took similar steps. Don Korte, Navico’s principal validation engineer, says B&G, Lowrance and Simrad radars from a decade ago were “pulse radars [that] were mostly analog with cavity-resonant magnetrons. The receiver had to track the magnetron.”

Manufacturers revolutionized radar in the mid-2010s when they began replacing magnetrons with solid-state gallium-nitride transistors. Unlike cavity magnetrons, whose frequencies vary over time and with temperature swings, gallium-nitride power amplifiers transmit highly predicable frequencies, simplifying data processing and improving image resolution.

Negotiating gunkholes and rocky harbors is far easier and safer with a forward-looking sonar system.
Negotiating gunkholes and rocky harbors is far easier and safer with a forward-looking sonar system. (Jesse Orrico/)

Moreover, while cavity magnetrons transmit peak bursts of RF energy over minute time slices (say, 0.08 microseconds), digital radars transmit lower levels of RF energy as compressed high-intensity radiated pulses. The latter are much like modern sounders, spreading the pulses over longer intervals (say, 100 microseconds). Solid-state transistors also produce better pulse shapes.

“The pulse goes out in one shape, and it comes back as a mirror image,” McGowan says, adding that the radar’s computer overlays these returns and uses algorithms and DSP to filter out noise. “It’s better at delivering target separation…we can do a lot more radar detection with a lot less power.”

Predictable frequencies and chirp transmissions opened the door for Doppler-enabled recreational radars in 2016. Doppler-enabled radars color code targets based on threat level, simplifying what can otherwise feel like a dark art.

“Most people don’t know how to read radar,” says Dave Dunn, Garmin’s director of sales and marketing for marine, adding that with Doppler processing, “if they see red, it’s bad. [Doppler] takes the stress out of it.”

Adjustments with Doppler include collision avoidance, Korte says, and mariners also can adjust their Doppler speed control to determine whether a distant storm is approaching or departing.

While there’s no question that Doppler processing simplifies radar use, Matt Wood, Furuno’s national sales manager, points to solid-state transistors as radar’s biggest gain in the past decade.

“The biggest advantage is that there’s no more magnetron,” Wood says, adding that cavity magnetrons are expensive, consumable parts, whereas solid-state amplifiers last for the life of the radar. “Solid-state transmissions are cleaner, and there’s more of a defined center frequency.” Also, Wood says, solid-state radars consume less power and emit less radiation than cavity-magnetron systems, while putting specific radiated power onto targets.

The NSS7 evo3 high-definition 7-inch display delivers a big-picture view of high-detail C-MAP US Enhanced inland and coastal charts, Radar, Active Imaging Sonar, and more.
The NSS7 evo3 high-definition 7-inch display delivers a big-picture view of high-detail C-MAP US Enhanced inland and coastal charts, Radar, Active Imaging Sonar, and more. (Courtesy Navico/)

On the display side, older radars offered 8-bit color, while modern multifunction displays have graphically rich, full-color screens. “The radar gives the picture, but the MFD does the interpretation with colors and intensity,” McGowan says.

Moreover, while modern radars digitally process and filter returning echoes in their scanners and stream this data over Ethernet to networked MFDs. Korte says that, in turn, modern MFDs must be capable of processing multiple data streams for dual-range operations.

Moving forward, expect higher-power solid-state radars that are better suited for finding distant birds. “Solid-state radars are equivalent to common magnetron power ratings now,” Wood says. “The next step involves increasing solid-state ratings to exceed how we’ve traditionally measured radar output power.”

The story of sonar’s evolution is impossible to tell without talking about chirp and DSP, however, it’s important to remember that the physics of sonar—namely, harnessing sound propagation to identify underwater targets—haven’t changed.

“A decade ago [side-looking sonar] was in its infancy, [down-scanning sonar] hadn’t been invented yet, and chirp sonar required a [black-box] module and a very expensive transducer in all displays,” says Matthew Laster, Navico’s displays product manager. “Today, all of those things are built into the most basic of displays.”

Moreover, most legacy sonars broadcast on dual frequencies (50 and 200 kilohertz) and employed black-and-white or limited-color displays. However, they typically used DSP to separate signal from noise.

As with radar, Wood says, much of this evolution can be traced back to the trend in the computer-electronics industry of gradually miniaturizing componentry and reducing manufacturing costs. With regards to sonar, this miniaturization and cost competitiveness is evident in chirp-enabled transducers and sonar modules, the latter of which matriculated from downstream black boxes to built-in applications that reside on today’s highly capable MFDs, which themselves have become powerful marinized computers with full-color displays.

Unlike traditional sonars, chirp sonars, which became widely available in 2013, simultaneously transmit over a spread of kilohertz frequencies.

“It’s the rise and fall of the sweep [transmissions] that give chirp sonar its favorable characteristics,” McGowan says, adding that traditional sonar transmissions—when studied on an oscilloscope—look like square-shaped waves and are far better at attaining accurate depth metrics than at identifying water-column targets or discerning bottom structure.

The Simrad HALO20 is a compact dome radar with pulse compression technology that detects collision hazards and other targets in close and up to 24 nautical miles away.
The Simrad HALO20 is a compact dome radar with pulse compression technology that detects collision hazards and other targets in close and up to 24 nautical miles away. (Courtesy Simrad/)

By comparison, “chirp transmissions look like mountain peaks,” McGowan says, adding that modern sonars lay these returning echoes over each other to determine the center of mass in objects that are close together (such as a baitball). Dunn likens traditional sonar to playing a song on a piano with just two keys, while chirp encompasses a music scale’s worth of notes.

“You can play a much prettier song than you can with just two notes,” he says, adding that chirp’s notes “give you much better target separation.”

Wood agrees, adding that “a transducer is to a sounder what a speaker is to a stereo. Chirping is a big deal because you’re looking at one or multiple ranges of frequencies.” Because of this relationship, Wood says, chirp-enabled transducers have played a significant role in sonar’s evolution. In sonar parlance, the Q-factor refers to a transducer’s propensity to ring after its power source is removed. While ideal in acoustic instruments, sonar transducers need to effectively self-mute after each transmission so they are ready to vibrate when the echo returns. Because of this, low-Q factor ceramics and components are fundamental to sonar’s evolution.

Likewise, and given the volume of data that chirp-enabled sonars generate, McGowan points to better, faster processors as another crucial step in sonar’s evolution.

“To get to chirp, we needed DSP to already be there,” he says.

As impressive as chirp technology is for target separation and image clarity, sonar’s evolution didn’t stop there; companies now offer down-, forward- and side-looking sonars that reveal everything from bottom structure to water-column targets and thermoclines. Moreover, some manufacturers now offer sonars that chirp on megahertz frequencies to yield picturelike sonar imagery of shallow soundings. There are also sonars that scan entire areas, rather than just pinging.

“As a kid, I used fathometer paper,” Dunn says. “Now, I can see fish swim up to the line and hit my bait.”

Expect even more refinement of single-frequency and multifrequency transmissions, multibeam technologies, and wide-beam sonar. Also, Wood says, “people want a [compact, high-power,] forward-looking array for safety on approach…that gives a range that’s five to six times the depth [in deep water]. But nobody’s there.” Yet.

Island Icon and Painter Llewelynn Xavier

Llewellyn Xavier may live on an island, but his artwork can be found around the globe.
Llewellyn Xavier may live on an island, but his artwork can be found around the globe. (Belle Portwe Photography/Daniel Marcon/)

St. Lucian painter Llewellyn Xavier has artworks in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C., New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art, and London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. To see his work on his home island, however, you need to schedule a visit with the man himself at his scenic hillside studio in Cap Estate, at the northernmost point of St. Lucia.

“I can see the entire island, all the way down to the Pitons,” he says. “It’s an amazing panorama.”

During the past four decades, Xavier’s artwork has provided a virtual panorama of St. Lucia’s flora, fauna and folklore, and reflected his passion for protecting the fragile environment of the Caribbean islands and beyond. (It also earned him the Order of the British Empire.) His thickly textured abstract oil paintings employ a luminous palette that, as he describes it, reflects “the light and life of the Caribbean.”

“St. Lucia is a natural paradise,” he says. “Its colors—the incredible turquoise of the sea, the amazing green forests—are very inspiring to me.”

How does it feel to be regarded as St. Lucia’s premier artist? It’s a humbling position to be in. When young, aspiring artists come to me, I emphasize the positive aspects of what they’re doing. I encourage them to paint, to go to art school, to develop their own craft at their own pace.

You’re the driving force behind the nascent St. Lucia Sculpture Park. What is its mission? It’s the brainchild of myself and my wife, Christina. The idea was to establish a sculpture park that encompasses the whole island and features artists of every description, whose work reflects the culture and history of St. Lucia… In 2020, we’ll have the installation of the island’s first art-pole project, in the Roseau Valley. These 16-foot poles will feature St. Lucian scenes by my wife, who paints under the name Fleur.

Llewellyn’s list for St. Lucia

The Pitons (Soufriere): This UNESCO World Heritage site is a must-see for anyone coming to St. Lucia.

Bayside Restaurant (Soufriere): It’s at the Sugar Beach Resort, which has the finest dining on the island. This excellent restaurant is right on the beach. It has a professional staff and a world-class chef.

Big Chef and Lil’ Chef (Rodney Bay): Big Chef serves excellent steak and fish, while Lil’ Chef does an international take on tapas.

Greenline’s 45 Fly Powerboat

The Greenline Yachts 45 Fly can be powered with traditional diesels, hybrid diesel-electric engines or electric-only power.
The Greenline Yachts 45 Fly can be powered with traditional diesels, hybrid diesel-electric engines or electric-only power. (Courtesy Greenline Yachts/)

Kermit the frog famously said, “It’s not easy being green,” but Greenline Yachts has a reputation for building environmentally friendly electric- and hybrid-drive yachts. And while the diesel-powered Greenline 45 Fly may seem to be a step back toward fossil fuels, it’s not. Here’s why.

Some North American buyers—I’m not pointing any fingers, but you know who you are—want more oomph than an electric/hybrid power package can offer. The Greenline 45 Fly offers twin Volvo Penta IPS pod-drive diesels (or shaft-drive Yanmars) for skippers who want some giddyap.

But having those diesels doesn’t mean owners give up eco-friendly features. Every Greenline comes with solar panels, a 7.2 kWh lithium-polymer battery and a 3 kW inverter for AC power. Tech talk is fine, but many skippers ask: “What’s in it for me?” Imagine having 120-volt AC power at anchor without running a generator. On a summer weekend, owners can power everything from the fridge to air conditioning to the blender for up to three days without a generator. No noise, just soundless energy—well, except for the blender making margaritas. Cloudy weekend? Kick on an engine to recharge the battery during day two. Opt for the fiberglass hardtop with solar panels on the top, and owners can stretch those quiet weekends even longer.

The Greenline E-Drive is pure electric. With batteries topped off at the marina, the yacht has a top speed of about 8 knots and a range of 40 nautical miles. Others may choose the Greenline H-Drive, with twin shaft-drive diesels starting at twin 220 hp and going up to 435 hp diesels with pods. The H-Drive 45 Fly can cruise under electric power at 6.5 knots with a range of 30 nautical miles. This gets you in and out of anchorages silently or allows a harbor cruise sans engine noise.

The sun provides power for onboard systems via solar panels on the flybridge.
The sun provides power for onboard systems via solar panels on the flybridge. (Courtesy Greenline Yachts/)

To keep power requirements to a minimum, Greenline designed a slippery hull form it calls the superdisplacement, which emulates those seen on sailing yachts to minimize drag. The boat I got aboard had twin 435 hp IPS600s that propelled the 45 Fly to a solid 30 knots. The boat came easily onto plane.

What surprised me, however, was that the wake was table flat. The 45 Fly was slipping through the water gracefully. And when we did take our lumps from buckets of wind in a choppy Gulf Stream, the boat had an easy, dry motion, parting the waves rather than trying to crush them. I registered just 70 decibels at 18 knots, making conversation exceptionally audible in the salon.

The builder also does a fine job with layouts and fit and finish. The 45 Fly, for example, has two airy staterooms, each with a walk-in closet—that owners can actually step into and close the door. There is 6-foot-5-inch headroom in the master stateroom and 6-foot-7-inch headroom in the master shower. The master also has a king berth with walk-around space, so no crawling into bed. The hullside windows are positioned so owners can enjoy the view while nestled under the covers.

Ambient light pours in through nearly 360 degrees of glass.
Ambient light pours in through nearly 360 degrees of glass. (Courtesy Greenline Yachts/)

Forward, the VIP stateroom has 6-foot-6-inch headroom, along with a queen-size walk-around berth and a walk-in closet. The boat we got aboard also had a washer/dryer here. This stateroom is bathed in light from five clerestory windows at deck level that give a view of sky from bed. And two opening ports are on each side at berth level.

I mentioned harbor cruises, and the 45 Fly lends itself to entertaining. The four-panel sliding doors fold away, opening the galley to the cockpit. A flip-down panel, which also serves as a backsplash with the salon doors closed, becomes an outdoor bar for the cockpit.

The overhead in the salon has 6-foot-6-inch headroom at the lowest point, adding to the sense of volume that the side windows impart. I particularly liked the walk-through door next to the helm seat. It’s by a deck cleat, so shorthanded skippers can get a line to the dock and still reach through the door to the pod’s joystick to keep the yacht placed.

The 45 Fly’s master stateroom has a walk-around king berth, a walk-in closet and 6-foot-5-inch headroom.
The 45 Fly’s master stateroom has a walk-around king berth, a walk-in closet and 6-foot-5-inch headroom. (Courtesy Greenline Yachts/)

The dinette in the salon converts to a double berth to handle guests or kids, but if owners absolutely must have a third stateroom, they can opt to trade the walk-in closets for a single-berth stateroom.

The bridge is pushed well aft to make room for solar panels, and it’s arranged for entertaining with a dining settee and mini galley console. The helm mirrors the lower station, and a sun pad fills the remaining space. A foldout grill and sink are at the transom, where there’s also a garage to stash fenders, Seabobs and deck gear.

Owners will have some decisions to make when it comes to propulsion, but whatever the choice, the Greenline 45 Fly has a lot to offer. Sometimes, it’s actually easy to be green.

Take the next step: greenlinehybrid.com

Tell Tales: Listen to Smart Old Guys

Good advice from Dave Martin, a longtime friend and mentor.
Good advice from Dave Martin, a longtime friend and mentor. (Steve Haefele/)

My pal designer Dave Martin is on my mind. In his 65th year at the drawing board, he died in November at the age of 89. Wanting to reconnect, I dug into his recently released digital update of Naval Architects Notebook. Chapter 5 caught my eye: “Listening to Smart Old Guys.”

The original Naval Architects Notebook, printed in 1972, was packed with Dave’s wonderful designs and their often-humorous backstories. For me, the book offered hope that my obsession with boats and my enrollment in the Westlawn yacht-design course might lead to a job. I was following a path that Dave had blazed years before I was born. 

Dave landed his first boatbuilding job fresh out of high school, working a broom at Egg Harbor Yacht Co. in 1948. He’d walked his dog back and forth in front of Egg Harbor co-founder Russell Post’s house until he cornered Post one morning and begged for a job. Dave soon graduated from the broom to the planking crew. He signed up for Westlawn that same year and studied at night.

He went to work for John E. Leek at Pacemaker Yachts in 1949. The day Dave was hired, Leek suggested that he quit after a while and knock around various boatbuilding jobs and learn more. He was halfway through Westlawn in 1951 when he interviewed at Sparkman & Stephens. “The [human resources] guy didn’t know a damn thing about boat design,” Dave once told me. “Things got loud, and [chief engineer] Gil Wyland emerged from his office, looked at my work and hired me.” 

Read More from Jay Coyle: Tell Tales

Dave started as a tracer and then became a draftsman and “interference checker” tasked with making sure all the stuff fit into the US Navy projects the team was noodling. He sweated memorizing the military specs and formulas required to accomplish the task until a wise 90-year-old engineer offered him a tip: Don’t try to remember anything—just remember what book it’s in.

In 1955, Dave opened his own business and, today, is best known for his efficient planing hull designs. He credited his success to his father’s advice. “Pop” was a machinist and inventor. He suggested that if you don’t tell anybody how your design works, they’ll never figure it out. Take it to a builder you trust, and take a royalty. Dave made a deal with John “Jack” Leek Jr., and Ocean Yachts was born. Dave ultimately shared his wisdom with his peers as a dedicated panel member at the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers.

Like Dave, I made the pilgrimage to Sparkman & Stephens at halftime in my Westlawn studies. My car crapped out on the East Side Drive, and I jogged down Third Avenue in a greasy, cheap suit, arriving to face off with an unenthusiastic chief engineer. Dave was one of the few to respond to my résumé, and he complimented my work, insisting that I keep at it. Thanks to Dave, I did—and so did he. When we last spoke, he was penning a new design for his 90th birthday.

Over the years, I stayed in touch with Dave and appreciated his advice and wisdom. I will miss him.

Meet the WB14 Limousine Tender

The WB14 limo tender will be built in carbon fiber and have a top speed of 40 knots.
The WB14 limo tender will be built in carbon fiber and have a top speed of 40 knots. (Courtesy Wooden Boats/)

Wooden Boats in Viareggio, Italy, has announced the WB14 Limousine Tender, a 46-foot custom design for a superyacht now under construction in Italy as well.

The WB14 is built of carbon fiber with vacuum resin infusion. Total weight is just over 7 tons, and top speed with 370-horsepower engines is 40 knots, according to the builder. Cruising speed is reportedly 34 knots, with a range of 200 nautical miles.

An ozone system automatically sanitizes the tender after each use.
An ozone system automatically sanitizes the tender after each use. (Courtesy Wooden Boats/)

Giorgio Cassetta did the interior and exterior design, with the forward helm station and aft guest cockpit inspired by Venetian water taxis. There’s additional seating inside for 14 guests in an air-conditioned space filled with teak and leather.

For onboard stowage, the entire superstructure lowers to fit in a garage less than 7 feet high.

The WB14 will serve as a superyacht tender.
The WB14 will serve as a superyacht tender. (Courtesy Wooden Boats/)

This tender is ready for the Covid-19 pandemic: Proteasrl designed an ozone system that automatically sanitizes the tender after each use.

For more information, visit: woodenboats.it

Benetti’s B.Yond: Expedition Design

Benetti's 37M B.Yond expedition yacht will be constructed in steel and aluminum.
Benetti's 37M B.Yond expedition yacht will be constructed in steel and aluminum. (Courtesy Benetti Yachts/)

Benetti Yachts in Italy has introduced a new range of expedition yachts called B.Yond. The first model is the B.Yond 37M, a 119-foot-9-inch motoryacht with a steel hull and aluminum superstructure.

The B.Yond concept includes a strict separation of deck functions, with crew on the lower deck, guest accommodations on the main deck, and living spaces on the upper deck. The concept also is intended to reduce the environmental impact of cruising, with a hybrid propulsion system that Siemens designed for Benetti.

The lower deck has quarters for seven crew, along with a galley, a laundry room and a cold-stowage space. Crew can access this deck from the yacht’s garage or the service stairs that connect all the decks, and that include a dumbwaiter. Owners and guests have different stairways to move around the yacht.

Nearly 360 degrees of glass keeps guests connected to the sea.
Nearly 360 degrees of glass keeps guests connected to the sea. (Courtesy Benetti Yachts/)

On the main deck, the full-beam owner’s stateroom is at the bow. All the guest accommodations have sea views, and the two stern staterooms, as well as the owner’s stateroom, can be fitted with private terraces. The sixth guest stateroom can become a gymnasium.

The garage is oversized to accommodate tenders and toys for expedition cruising. Benetti says the space can handle two personal watercraft along with two tenders of about 13 and 21 feet length overall. Folding gunwales allow hauling and launching from both sides of the mothership, and stairs at the stern access a sauna, toy room, and more equipment stowage.

The 37M B.Yond is designed by Stefano Righini.
The 37M B.Yond is designed by Stefano Righini. (Courtesy Benetti Yachts/)

How does the diesel-electric propulsion system work? It operates in four modes. Enhanced Comfort is for night or coastal cruising with no emissions; Eco Cruise is for use at anchor with no emissions; Extended Range reduces consumptions on long hauls; and Eco Transfer lets one engine drive both shafts to reduce engine hours and improve performance.

For more information, visit: benettiyachts.it

Zeelander Yachts Expands

Zeelander has increased its production capacity, enabling it to build five yachts at one time, like this Z55.
Zeelander has increased its production capacity, enabling it to build five yachts at one time, like this Z55. (Courtesy Zeelander Yachts/)

Zeelander Yachts in the Netherlands has added nearly 5,000 square feet of space to its production facility, allowing it to build five yachts at a time.

“We are expanding in several phases, and the first one is now complete,” Sietse Koopmans, founder and chairman of Zeelander, stated in a press release. “The area for winter storage is increased, so we will be able to accommodate more yachts from clients that want us to take care of their yachts.”

The next phases of expansion are expected to include new offices as well as additional work areas within the shipyard.

“We have a healthy order book. Therefore, we decided to develop the facility step by step, without jumplike transitions,” Koopmans stated.

What models does Zeelander build? The builder has three models: the Z44, Z55 and Z72.

Take the next step: go to zeelander.com

Sanlorenzo Launches First 44Alloy

The Sanlorenzo Yachts 44Alloy is built in aluminum with exteriors by Bernardo Zuccon.
The Sanlorenzo Yachts 44Alloy is built in aluminum with exteriors by Bernardo Zuccon. (Courtesy Sanlorenzo/)

Sanlorenzo Yachts in Italy has launched Hull No. 1 of the all-aluminum 44Alloy, an evolution of the yard’s 40Alloy.

The fast-displacement 44Alloy has interiors by Michele Bonan in Florence, Italy, and exteriors by Bernardo Zuccon. Hull No. 1 of the 44Alloy is among five of the yachts already sold and under construction.

Onboard features include a 1,560-square-foot owners’ apartment that spans three decks with indoor and outdoor spaces. Aft is a beach club that opens on three sides. Additional guest space is on the foredeck.

What else is new at Sanlorenzo? The shipyard has resumed full-pace operations after delays due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Take the next step: go to sanlorenzoyacht.com

Meet Prestige’s 420 Fly

With 425 hp Cummins, we saw a best range of 247 nautical miles at 27.9 knots.
With 425 hp Cummins, we saw a best range of 247 nautical miles at 27.9 knots. (Romero Jean Francois/)

Yacht design 101 for the flybridge on a 42-foot cruiser: Plop a helm station forward of the bridge, put a guest’s seat next to it, and add a dinette aft. Sure, that sounds vanilla, but there’s not much room for an abundance of creativity on the flybridge of a midsize yacht.

Well, unless it’s the bridge on the Prestige 420 Fly.

Rather than having a centerline helm that dominates the bridge, there’s a compact, low-slung steering station to port. You won’t find a standard-issue guest chair, either. Instead, the entire starboard-side of the forward half of the bridge is dedicated to a double-wide lounger/sun pad with flip-up backrests. Which do you think is better for entertaining guests: seats behind a console or a lounger with room for a couple to stretch out in the salty breezes and warm sunshine?

Behind the sun pad is a console with a grill, refrigerator and sink and, abaft that, an L-shaped dinette. When I got aboard the 420 Fly, I had plenty of elbow room with a half-dozen people around me.

Multiple carpet zones, ­interior and exterior cushion-­upholstery choices, woodwork selections, and countertop finishes let owners personalize the Prestige 420 Fly.
Multiple carpet zones, ­interior and exterior cushion-­upholstery choices, woodwork selections, and countertop finishes let owners personalize the Prestige 420 Fly. (Courtesy Prestige Yachts/)

Prestige maximizes the square footage up top by extending the bridge over the cockpit and pushing the mast to the very back of the brow, abaft the L-shaped lounge and rail. But the real space saving comes from the yacht’s compact helm. There’s not an overabundance of room for electronics, nor is there much elevation over the deck, but there sure is space all around.

For skippers who want multiple displays, a double-wide helm seat, and the full suite of buttons and switches, there is the lower helm station. This area of the boat is also laid out to enhance socializing. The salon has more space than on Prestige’s previous 42-foot models, thanks to the way the builder eliminated a second staircase to the bridge. Abaft the helm, there’s a settee and, to port, a raised dinette with a tricked-out table that folds, spins and drops to turn the dinette into a double berth when needed. The galley is aft and to port, just forward of the sliding doors to the cockpit.

Transfomer-style seating should make the flybridge as popular as the galley for congregating with guests.
Transfomer-style seating should make the flybridge as popular as the galley for congregating with guests. (Romero Jean Francois/)

Out on the water, the 420 Fly cruised at around 25 knots and hit a wide-open speed of 30.7 knots with the optional 425 hp Cummins 6.7 diesels (380 hp Cummins are standard). With 16.5 degrees of transom deadrise and almost 23,000 pounds of heft, the yacht crushed a 1- to 2-foot Chesapeake Bay chop. The 309-gallon fuel capacity provided a range just slightly over 220 nautical miles at cruise speed, allowing for a 10 percent reserve. That’s more than enough for runs across the bay and weekend voyages, but if you plan on making extended runs, you’ll want to plan fuel stops accordingly.

The V-drive propulsion is also a reason why the belowdecks layout is creative in terms of space. The full-beam master stateroom extends surprisingly far aft because the machinery takes up less room than other configurations. Of course, this model’s additional 4 inches of beam and 6 inches of length overall expanded the master’s footprint too. Hullside windows add natural light, and niceties such as a vanity and bedside tables with reading lamps are built in.

And there’s another spot on this yacht that’s prime for relaxing with friends: the cockpit. It has an L-shaped settee with a dinette, access to the swim platform, and bulk stowage in the transom. Equally as important: The extended flybridge offers shade and protection from the elements for most of the cockpit area.

High  bowrails ensure safe transit on board the Prestige 420 Fly.
High bowrails ensure safe transit on board the Prestige 420 Fly. (Courtesy Prestige Yachts/)

There’s yet another mingling spot for guests forward. The entire front of the cabin top is used for a triple-size lounger with flip-up backrests. The width of the lounge is aided by the shape of the bow, which carries more beam forward than usual before coming to its angular forepeak.

If you’re tired of seeing the same layouts on 40-foot yachts, then the Prestige 420 Fly is worth a look at the next boat show. From the vessel’s flybridge to the master stateroom, yachstmen will notice creative ways of thinking—and, soon, everyone on board will too.

Take the next step: prestige-yachts.com

Ready for the Bahamas to Reopen?

The 80-foot Pachoud <i>Samara</i> accommodates eight guests in four staterooms, including a master with private access to the hot tub.
The 80-foot Pachoud Samara accommodates eight guests in four staterooms, including a master with private access to the hot tub. (Courtesy Ocean Independence/)

Ocean Independence says the 80-foot Pachoud Samara is dropping her weekly base rate from $60,000 to $50,000 in anticipation of the Bahamas reopening to tourists on July 1.

“Stay in isolated anchorages and spend days exploring pristine sandbars, using her seemingly never-ending list of water toys and enjoying her large outdoor guest spaces,” the company stated in a press release. “An ideal option for families and friends to enjoy time away from home together.”

Samara is a 2015 build that was most recently refitted in 2019. She accommodates eight guests in four staterooms, including a master that has private access to the hot tub.

The yacht charters with four crew, offers scuba gear and can do nighttime movies up on the flybridge.

How fast can Samara cruise around the Bahamian islands? Her top speed is reportedly 22 knots, with a cruising speed of 12 knots.

For more information, visit: oceanindependence.com

Majesty 140 Enters the Ring

The Majesty Yachts 140 is based on the builder’s earlier Gulf Craft 135.
The Majesty Yachts 140 is based on the builder’s earlier Gulf Craft 135. (Courtesy Majesty Yachts/)

In 1982, an ambitious businessman in his early 20s set up a boatbuilding shop in Ajman, the smallest of the United Arab Emirates. Mohammed Al Shaali, a captain’s son, had a lifelong love of the water and fishing. The first boats from his shop, located north of Dubai, were 14-foot-long runabouts for the local market. Soon, there were cruisers and fishing boats in the 20- to 30-foot range. The Middle East remained a lucrative market for the company, called Gulf Craft, for many years.

More facilities opened to handle new models, with nearly all disciplines in-house, but it wasn’t enough. Al Shaali knew that true growth meant tapping into new markets. By establishing relationships with dealers in other countries, Gulf Craft began building an international client base—except for the biggest boating market in the world, the United States.

That strategy has now changed. Nearly 40 years after its founding, Gulf Craft has a presence on American shores through its superyacht brand, Majesty Yachts, and models detailed specifically for the US market, including the Majesty 140. The sales pitch is for customization, shortened delivery schedules and a lower price point than other large-yacht builders. Al Shaali says Majesty Yachts offers “savings of as much as 20 percent compared to currently available competitive yacht offerings.”

The Majesty 140 has considerable volume, coming in at 398 gross tons.
The Majesty 140 has considerable volume, coming in at 398 gross tons. (Courtesy Majesty Yachts/)Including wood choices, layout, decor and more, Majesty Yachts will customize every aspect of the 140.
Including wood choices, layout, decor and more, Majesty Yachts will customize every aspect of the 140. (Courtesy Majesty Yachts/)

The Majesty 140 evolved from a sistership, the Gulf Craft 135. That series saw a half-dozen or so deliveries before being retired, and the Majesty 140 adds amenities. There’s larger glass along the three decks for wider views, and there’s raked glass fronting the wheelhouse for a more purposeful profile. And, at 398 gross tons, “it’s the biggest in its class,” says Greg Terraglio, managing partner of Majesty Yachts USA.

Terraglio believes the clinchers for American customers, though, are “immediate delivery” and getting a yacht designed the way they want. He’s already sold one spec-built 140 and expects to close a contract on the 140 that debuted at this past fall’s Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show. (He also sold a spec Majesty 100 that arrived stateside in time for the show.) “There’s nothing we won’t do,” Terraglio says of customizations, adding that the yard will make unorthodox changes such as putting the master suite where the sky lounge usually is. The Italian studio Cristiano Gatto Design, responsible for the Majesty 140’s interior, will also work with owners on custom ideas such as backlit stone in the master bath’s free-standing tub.

The 140 has room for a ­sizable soiree at sea. There’s a cockpit table, foldout ­cockpit balconies, an upper deck with a round table, U-shaped lounge and bar, and a sun deck with another bar, hot tub, fold-down TV and two more lounges.
The 140 has room for a ­sizable soiree at sea. There’s a cockpit table, foldout ­cockpit balconies, an upper deck with a round table, U-shaped lounge and bar, and a sun deck with another bar, hot tub, fold-down TV and two more lounges. (Courtesy Majesty Yachts/)

Though, it’s hard to imagine wanting to move the master from its main-deck location. A hydraulically driven balcony is off the port side, with automatically deploying handrails, giving owners an idyllic spot to enjoy morning coffee or to take in the scenery at anchor. (There can be plenty of anchorages to enjoy too, given the 140’s reported 4,750-nautical-mile range at 10 knots.)

Family and friends, of course, also get plenty of places to enjoy a respite from the workaday world. One of the nicest surprises aboard the Majesty 140 is actually two things: two fold-down balconies off the main deck aft. On most mega-yachts in this size range, guest balconies are off the salon or formal dining area, turning indoor spaces into indoor-outdoor spaces. Because most owners and guests spend their time outside anyway, Majesty Yachts chose to augment the 140’s alfresco entertaining area instead.

Behind the transom door is the teak beach club for coffee with guests and seaside views.
Behind the transom door is the teak beach club for coffee with guests and seaside views. (Courtesy Majesty Yachts/)Majesty Yachts is a new brand from Gulf Craft. The Majesty 140 is the builder’s first US offering.
Majesty Yachts is a new brand from Gulf Craft. The Majesty 140 is the builder’s first US offering. (Courtesy Majesty Yachts/)

The builder is paying attention to what buyers want in other ways too. For example, as guests walk through the 140, motion sensors trigger lights automatically whenever someone enters a room. And in an eco-friendly move, Majesty uses half a tree for the salon and dining-area soles, as opposed to using panels from five trees the way some other builders do. Crew-only passages are hidden, including a door off the foyer leading to the master stateroom and access to the crew stairs, cabins and galley. Terraglio says that customers are “wowed when they walk on board.”

This builder has come a long way since those early days in Ajman in 1982.

Take the next step: majestyyachtsusa.com

Royal Huisman to Build Nauta Reichel Pugh 151

The Royal Huisman Nauta Reichel Pugh 151 is an aluminum and carbon design.
The Royal Huisman Nauta Reichel Pugh 151 is an aluminum and carbon design. (Courtesy Royal Huisman/)

Royal Huisman in the Netherlands has inked a deal to build the Nauta Reichel Pugh 151, an aluminum and carbon design that internally is being called Project 405.

The 151-foot yacht is being built for experienced owners who want to sail the world and take top prizes in regattas.

Nigel Ingram of MCM Newport is representing the owners. Nauta Design is handling exterior and interior styling. Reichel/Pugh has been tapped for the yacht’s naval architecture. Rondal will design the carbon Panamax rig, and Royal Huisman will lead on engineering and construction.

Delivery is scheduled for 2022—and construction is being planned with “intelligent lockdown” measures in mind, with respect to the Covid-19 pandemic.

“These measures allow the shipyard team to continue working in strict observance of the regulations, such as the continuous monitoring of its workers’ health situation; social distancing; office staff working from home; and workshop employees working in shifts to limit the number of people on site,” Royal Huisman stated in a press release, adding that the yacht is the first in the yard’s history “contracted as the result of intensive video conferencing and telephone calls between the owners, their representative and the design/build team.”

How many people will the yacht accommodate overnight? Eight to 10 owners and guests, along with eight crew.

For more information, visit: royalhuisman.com

Sharrow MX-1R to Start Mass Production

Sharrow Marine says it will soon start mass production on its MX-1R propeller.
Sharrow Marine says it will soon start mass production on its MX-1R propeller. (Courtesy Sharrow Marine/)

Sharrow Marine, whose MX-1 propeller won an Innovation Award at the 2020 Miami International Boat Show, has announced plans for a mass-produced, cast version called the MX-1R.

The propeller is expected to be in production by the end of the year, with the first deliveries to consumers in spring 2021.

“We’ve really listened to consumers and customers, and know that the custom-made, CNC-machined version is out of reach for many boaters, which is why we accelerated our plans for a mass-produced, cast version,” Greg Sharrow, founder and CEO of Sharrow Marine, stated in a press release.

The Sharrow Propeller is reportedly 9 percent to 15 percent more efficient than some other designs, allowing boaters to achieve higher top speeds, better handling and reduced vibrations. The CNC-machined model is available in aluminum or stainless steel.

Where is Sharrow Marine based? In Philadelphia, with additional offices in Detroit.

How to order a Sharrow MX-1R: The cast version of the propeller can be ordered with a $100 deposit at sharrowmarine.com

Invictus GT370S: With Outboards

The Invictus GT370S can be powered with twin Yamaha 425 XTO outboards.
The Invictus GT370S can be powered with twin Yamaha 425 XTO outboards. (Courtesy Invictus Yacht/)

Invictus Yachts has unveiled an outboard-powered version of its GT370, called the GT370S.

The GT370S can be ordered with twin Yamaha 425 XTO outboard engines, for a total of 850 horsepower. The outboard engines mean the yacht no longer has a stern platform, but interior space that previously included the engine room becomes additional stowage.

Inside, owners can customize the two rooms. The stern room can be set up with one or two berths, and the bow room can be set up with a berth or with a sofa and table.

Up top, there are three seats at the helm, along with a foldable side lounging deck. For grabbing lunch on the hook, there’s a refrigerator, sink, ice maker and cabinets.

“The GT370S embodies the perfect balance between the more delicate and, possibly, more feminine grand tourer soul of Invictus, and the more dynamic and masculine spirit of a boat that wants to conquer with the speed and sound of its engines,” the builder stated in a press release.

Who designed the Invictus GT370S? Italian designer Christian Grande.

For more information, visit: invictusyacht.com

Riva 88’ Folgore Launches

Hull-side glass and a raked superstructure help visually lower the Riva 88 Folgore's profile.
Hull-side glass and a raked superstructure help visually lower the Riva 88 Folgore's profile. (Courtesy Riva Yacht/)

Riva Yachts in Italy has launched the Riva 88’ Folgore, saying that even despite the Covid-19 pandemic, its shipyards are in a state of “nonstop activity.”

Folgore, which Riva translates as “lightning,” has exterior design inspired by the automotive world. Carbon and steel combine with mahogany inlays for the construction materials, and there’s a new stern design that lets the garage door sit at water level or be submerged.

The 236-square-foot cockpit has a sofa, a table and a bar with an electrically opening marble top. Up one level on the flybridge, the glass hardtop on the superstructure can tilt toward the stern or the bow, depending on where the owner wants natural airflow.

How many options are available for the master stateroom layout? Three. And, there are three ensuite guest staterooms as well.

For more information, visit: riva-yacht.com

The Moorings: Charter Reopening Protocols

To keep charter guests safe, The Moorings staff will adhere to 6-foot social distancing, wear masks and gloves, and have temperatures checked daily.
To keep charter guests safe, The Moorings staff will adhere to 6-foot social distancing, wear masks and gloves, and have temperatures checked daily. (Courtesy The Moorings/)

The Moorings, which operates 20 charter-yacht bases worldwide, has announced reopening steps that it plans to implement as various regions reopen during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Staff will adhere to 6-foot social distancing, wear masks and gloves, and have temperatures checked daily. Additional hand-washing and sanitizing procedures have been put in place.

Yachts in The Moorings fleet will be disinfected via fogging when they return to the dock. They will then be cleaned, sanitized and disinfected again prior to the next charter group’s arrival. Galley provisions will be in a sealed box that is labeled and dated, and linens will be provided in a sealed bag. Clients will receive a care pack containing disinfectant spray, hand wipes and sanitizing products.

Charter clients will now be required to provide their own snorkeling gear. The Moorings will no longer provide complimentary snorkeling gear, but will have it available for purchase. All payments will be made via debit or credit card, to reduce the handling of cash.

Are charter clients of The Moorings being asked to wear masks? Yes, when they are at The Moorings base or interacting with staff in a location where local policy urges the wearing of masks.

For more information, visit: moorings.com

Charter this Azimut in New England

The 105-foot Azimut <i>Amanecer</i> has dates open for bookings in New England with a weekly base rate of $70,000.
The 105-foot Azimut Amanecer has dates open for bookings in New England with a weekly base rate of $70,000. (Courtesy Superyacht Sales and Charter/)

Superyacht Sales and Charter has welcomed the 105-foot Azimut Amanecer to the charter fleet, with dates open this summer for bookings in New England.

Inquiries are also being accepted now for charters during winter 2020-21 in the Bahamas.

Amanecer is a 2009 build that most recently was refitted in 2015. She accommodates eight to 10 guests in four staterooms.

Water toys and tenders include a 32-foot Intrepid with twin 300-horsepower outboards, a Sea-Doo, five Seabobs, water skis and wakeboards, tow toys, a trio of standup paddleboards, fishing and snorkeling gear, and two drones for taking keepsake photos and videos.

What’s the lowest weekly base rate to book Amanecer? It’s $70,000.

For more information, visit: superyachtsalesandcharter.com

An Eco-friendly Tender

Note the hinged bow door that lets guests step in and out of the tender at the beach, as opposed to climbing over the gunwales.
Note the hinged bow door that lets guests step in and out of the tender at the beach, as opposed to climbing over the gunwales. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

At the cannes yachting festival this past fall, DutchCraft—a sister company to Zeelander—unveiled the DC56. It was not your typical 56-footer. Built to seat as many as 44 people, it also could be loaded up with tons of gear, set up for a party with a DJ platform or turned into a fish-stalking machine with a fighting chair. And it had a maximum speed of 40 knots.

Now comes the second model from DutchCraft, the DC25, a superyacht tender that shows an equal amount of innovative thinking in design.

The DC25, which premiered in January at the boat show in Düsseldorf, Germany, has a length overall of 26 feet, 3 inches. It’s built of carbon fiber and has fully electric propulsion, with the ability to cruise silently at 32 knots for 75 minutes, or to cruise at 6 knots for six hours, according to the builder.

“We believe electric propulsion will be key in a future that cares about ocean preservation,” Floris Koopmans, DutchCraft’s sales and marketing manager, stated in a press release. “We are committed to investing in this positive movement, and the technology that we have developed for the DC25 is a step in the right direction.”

The low position and compact size of the drivetrain is what gives the boat so much extra space on deck. There’s a center console forward for the skipper, with rails abaft it that allow elements to be swapped out. At right, you can see how the DC25 looks with padded bench seating on the rails. More seats can be added to fit as many as 12 guests, or the seats can slide away to make room for, say, a rack holding eight sets of scuba-diving gear or piles of luggage heading to and from shore. Or the deck space can be left open to house a pair of personal watercraft, all kinds of gear or, perhaps, an ATV.

The DC25 has a 1-foot-4-inch draft that makes it useful as a near-shore tender because it can wiggle through the shallows.
The DC25 has a 1-foot-4-inch draft that makes it useful as a near-shore tender because it can wiggle through the shallows. (Courtesy DutchCraft/)

The center console is shaded by a hardtop that pivots toward the bow, a design element that DutchCraft says will make stowage easier in a superyacht tender garage. And the height of the hardtop can drop from 11 feet to 6 feet, 4 inches when it’s time to put the tender away for the night. Beam on the boat is 7 feet, 8 inches.

“There is nothing else like it in the size category,” Koopmans says. “The sheer capacity and range of uses [are] phenomenal.”

The DC25 can be used as a family dayboat, or it can be a crew-ready shuttle for

handling groceries and garbage. The boat’s batteries can even be used as an auxiliary power supply for a superyacht at anchor or in port.

The design brief on the DC25 called for giving yacht owners “the flexibility and fun they desire from life on the water, backed up by robust and practical design.” For a Dutch brand looking to establish its bona fides primarily on the ideas of versatility and practicality, the DC25 is a smart follow-up launch as the sistership to the DC56.

Far-Flung Charter

<i>Imagine</i> is a 1993 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She has circumnavigated the world three times already.
Imagine is a 1993 build that most recently was refitted in 2018. She has circumnavigated the world three times already. (Camper & Nicholsons International/)

Capt. Riccardo del Prete is excited, even though he isn’t exactly sure about what’s going to happen next.

He’s the captain aboard Imagine, a 110-foot Alloy whose owners are planning to sail around the world and make the boat available to charter guests along the way. The loose plan is for Imagine to leave the Caribbean and head toward Panama about the time you read this, and then spend time in Belize and the Galapagos Islands before crossing the Pacific Ocean. From there, she’ll head toward the Tuamotus, Marquesas and Society Islands for summer 2020, and she’ll be in her birthplace of New Zealand for the America’s Cup in March 2021. Next will be the Mediterranean, and after that, who knows?

“Our idea is to have the program and then see what the clients want to do,” del Prete says. “We can spend more time in the east or the west coast of Panama, or move to Costa Rica or to Belize. These are all beautiful places, and it will be interesting to see which inquiries come in.”

The round-the-world charter opportunities are the byproduct of the owner’s desire to cruise the world’s more remote locations. And because he wants to cruise farther afield than charter yachts usually go, clients also will have the opportunity to book in regions that typically aren’t offered by boats of any kind.

The Society Islands, which include Tahiti and Bora Bora, are on Imagine’s upcoming itinerary.
The Society Islands, which include Tahiti and Bora Bora, are on Imagine’s upcoming itinerary. (iStock/Bomboman/)

Imagine is precisely the right boat for that ambitious style of chartering, says Nicole Terry, who manages the yacht’s charter program with Camper & Nicholsons International.

“She has circumnavigated three times in her life and is a proven oceangoing, world-cruising sailing yacht,” Terry says. “She has also completed numerous Atlantic crossings and competed in many regattas. Imagine proudly bears one of the most sought-after design and build pedigrees of the sailing-yacht world: She hails from the drawing boards of the award-winning Dubois studio and was built by New Zealand’s Alloy Yachts in 1993.”

That pedigree, along with her 2018 refit, means Imagine’s appearance as a spectator yacht at the America’s Cup will be a homecoming for a local girl who sailed into the world and made good. The Cup will be raced in Auckland, on the same waters where Imagine did her shakedown runs after launching.

“It is quite poetic that she will be there and available to charter for the event,” Terry says, adding that the weekly base rate will be $79,000 during the Cup. “At this stage, we are open to any plans our clients might have. We are already getting a lot of interest for this period, and everyone is very excited already to be there—the crew and captain included.”

In the Society Islands, charter clients can go ashore to watch traditional celebrations.
In the Society Islands, charter clients can go ashore to watch traditional celebrations. (iStock/Arayuth3390/)

The yacht has three staterooms and can charter with as many as seven guests in a few configurations. There’s a full-beam master with an adjoining children’s corner for two youngsters. One of the guest staterooms has a double berth, and the other has three singles. The layout makes her an option for a family with children or for a group of adults.

“The other major element is that Imagine is a true yachtsman’s yacht,” Terry says. “Capt. Riccardo loves to get sailing enthusiasts young and old involved in the plotting of the route and the sailing of the yacht where he can. Sailing lessons, cooking lessons, yoga lessons, fishing—this is a crew that love to get the guests involved and are happy to share their passion. I think this is great for groups of adults who want to learn or are already sailors—and truly wonderful for children, to inspire them and educate them about the ocean, winds and stars.”

Del Prete says he puts a premium on guest comfort even in remote destinations, a skill set that will be needed for charter clients who want to book in archipelagos where the boat may be the only place around with provisions, air conditioning and first-aid gear.

“We have a very high standard of comfort on board, even in remote places,” he says. “We can tailor the program for guests who want more or less adventure. Some people just want to be on the beaches, but others want all kinds of scuba diving. We can do both.”

New Zealand is Imagine’s birthplace, and it’s where she’ll be chartering in early 2021 for the America’s Cup in Auckland.
New Zealand is Imagine’s birthplace, and it’s where she’ll be chartering in early 2021 for the America’s Cup in Auckland. (iStock/Daniel Thomson/)

Terry says her team at Camper & Nicholsons can work with clients who want to book just one week or who want to book several weeks aboard in different destinations, flying back and forth to the yacht to meet up with del Prete and the crew as they make their way around the world.

“We are certainly seeing more interest from clients in further-flung places,” Terry says. “The Med will always be a strong cruising ground, but more and more clients are interested in venturing to places as extreme as Antarctica. This is also evident in the fact that the owners too are keen to venture there themselves and share these wonderful destinations with family and friends on their yacht. Imagine isn’t heading to Antarctica just yet, but you never know.”

For del Prete, simply planning the upcoming circumnavigation has been an adventure. He’s thinking about the places that he will be seeing for the first time and about the leeway the owners are allowing to truly explore them.

“We will have plenty of time,” he says. “We do not want to be rushed. We can go and go without touching any port. It’s very exciting.”

Take the next step: camperandnicholsons.com

Reviewed: Galeon Yachts 680 Fly

Foredeck sun pads retract and tables rise electrically to form alfresco dining space.
Foredeck sun pads retract and tables rise electrically to form alfresco dining space. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

There are two ways to absorb what Poland’s Galeon Yachts has achieved with the 680 Fly: one is to look at a photograph and the other is to stand in the salon.

When I first looked at the image of the 680 Fly, taken at dusk with all of the yacht’s lights on, I was startled. It seemed as though the yacht glowed, with light pouring from multiple windows on all decks.

Later, standing in the salon, I was surrounded by windows that drop down electrically, just as in a car. Want to feel the breeze and smell the sea air? Push a button. As Bob Burke, brand manager for Galeon importer MarineMax, says, “It feels like a giant dayboat.”

That sense of openness is a noteworthy achievement aboard a 68-foot vessel. The 680 Fly is indeed Galeon’s largest Fly model. The only bigger boats that Galeon builds are the 700 Skydeck and 780 Crystal. The 680 Fly is a fourth-generation design for the builder, which has learned to maximize not only the feeling of space but also creature comforts on board.

One of the best examples of Galeon opening up the interior is next to the helm seat: a door to the side deck floats in a one-piece, sole-to-ceiling glass window. The whole interior concept takes cues from waves, with rounded design elements in the fiberglass and woodwork.

The salon’s dining table to port stretches 7 feet, 1 inch, creating family-size eating space. A couch on the opposite side adds to the comfort quotient.

The Galeon 680 Fly’s full-beam master stateroom has private access from the salon. That’s a king-size berth.
The Galeon 680 Fly’s full-beam master stateroom has private access from the salon. That’s a king-size berth. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

Aft, the U-shaped galley keeps the chef out of any traffic flow. An island counter is sized for a buffet. Don’t expect the chef to get anything done quickly, though; the window over the counter is mightily distracting. Opposite the galley is a choice of arrangements, with a pair of seats and a table for snacks tied in popularity with a pair of bar stools and a countertop.

Forward, for the skipper and a companion, are high-backed pedestal seats with footrests. They’re abaft a dashboard with twin Raymarine multifunction displays and Boening monitors for the engines. Galeon’s Integrated Management Information System reads on the MFDs, and the Empire digital-switching system handles a multitude of functions. The throttle and shifters are on a pedestal, as are the bow- and stern-thruster joysticks. Overhead, a sliding sunroof adjusts to the skipper’s vitamin-D requirements.

The full-beam master stateroom is accessed via private stairs from the salon. There’s a king berth on centerline. Hanging lockers are on each side, while a settee is to starboard and a desk with tidy partitions is to port. The head is aft in a compartment distinct from the shower and vanity.

This stateroom is quiet. While the 680 Fly ran at 24 knots, my sound meter barely registered 70 dB(A), which is about the level of normal conversation.

Stairs and a companionway forward of the salon lead to the guest accommodations, including the forepeak VIP. On most boats, this is the space where bed size is constricted to match the hull sides, but guests on the 680 Fly have a king-berth width (80 inches). The en suite head allots 29-by-34 inches for the shower, with a glass door.

The helmsman has quick side-deck access. Note the breakfast nook for family and friends.
The helmsman has quick side-deck access. Note the breakfast nook for family and friends. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

Just abaft the VIP are a pair of guest staterooms, each with twin berths that convert to doubles. These staterooms share a head that also serves as the yacht’s day-head.

Back in the cockpit and just steps from the galley, a settee is wrapped around a teak table in the shade of the flybridge overhang. There’s a pull-down shade and wind block abaft the settee.

Teak steps lead to the flybridge, whose beam extends over the side decks aft, allowing room for a C-shaped dinette that seats 15. Just forward is a U-shaped bar with a fridge, ice maker, sink, grill and bottle stowage.

The flybridge helm virtually duplicates the lower helm, adding a settee to port and a sun pad stretching to the venturi windscreen. The hardtop has an opening sunroof. To keep the 680 Fly’s center of gravity low, the entire superstructure including the hardtop is made of carbon fiber, removing thousands of pounds of weight over fiberglass layups.

The foredeck is also designed with guest relaxation in mind. Here, the sun pad has a pair of tables that pop up electrically, turning the area into twin dining tables surrounded by four couches.

Dual purpose: The flybridge overhang adds real estate up top, and shades the cockpit dining space.
Dual purpose: The flybridge overhang adds real estate up top, and shades the cockpit dining space. (Courtesy Galeon Yachts/Voyage Photography/)

MarineMax, which imports the 680 Fly, upgrades the standard 1,000 MAN diesels to 1,200 hp versions. We hit 32 knots with a 125 gph fuel burn, resulting in a 236-nautical-mile range. At a 28-knot cruise, fuel burn was 110.8 gph, providing a 247-nautical-mile range. At a leisurely 20-knot cruise speed, fuel burn is 68 gph and range climbs to 271 nautical miles. The Tony Castro-designed hull is slippery, coming up fast and flat onto plane without needing the Humphree Interceptor trim tabs to push the bow down. Handling is light and nimble—and assured.

With a multitasking layout, accommodations for a family and then some, admirable performance, and clever flourishes (such as transforming side decks), the Galeon 680 Fly is a new style of cruising yacht for a new generation of cruisers.


Take the next step: galeonyachts.us

Tankoa’s S501 in Final Construction Phase

Tankoa Yachts in Italy is beginning final construction on the 164-foot S501. The yacht is a sistership to <i>Bintador</i> and <i>Vertige</i>, with design by Francesco Paszkowski.
Tankoa Yachts in Italy is beginning final construction on the 164-foot S501. The yacht is a sistership to Bintador and Vertige, with design by Francesco Paszkowski. (Courtesy Tankoa/)

Tankoa Yachts in Italy has resumed work on the 164-foot S501, which is now beginning final construction with crews returning to work from the Covid-19 shutdown.

S501 was started on spec and purchased in March, just before the pandemic struck in Europe. The yacht is a sistership to Bintador and Vertige, with design by Francesco Paszkowski.

The layout on S501 is similar to that of her sisterships, however, the main deck aft is entirely a lounge (the dining room is on the upper deck) and the master stateroom forward has a lounge that converts to an en suite stateroom.

“Although we were effectively obliged to stop work for two months, production is now back on track,” Giuseppe Mazza, Tankoa’s sales manager, stated in a press release. “With construction at more than 75 percent complete, we’re making up for lost time and looking at delivery by the end of the year to allow the owner to use it in the Caribbean”

The yacht’s paint scheme is expected to include a black hull with a metallic gray superstructure. Interior design is by Casadio Miami in the United States.

What is S501’s projected speed? 14 knots at cruise with a 17.5-knot top end, according to Tankoa.

For more information, visit: tankoa.it

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