Victory Yacht Sales

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End-of-Season Deal on Mediterranean Yacht Charter

For the mont of September, the 130-foot Heesen <em>Lionshare</em> has a weekly base rate of $94,500, for the month of September in the West Mediterranean.
For the mont of September, the 130-foot Heesen Lionshare has a weekly base rate of $94,500, for the month of September in the West Mediterranean. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons/)

Camper & Nicholsons International says the 130-foot Heesen Lionshare is dropping her weekly base rate by about $22,000, to a new rate of about $94,500, for the month of September in the West Mediterranean.

Lionshare is 1987 build that most recently was refitted in 2017. She accommodates 10 to 12 guests in five staterooms, and she has an outdoor cinema for movie nights under the stars.

<em>Lionshare</em> was refitted in 2017. She accommodates 10 to 12 guests.
Lionshare was refitted in 2017. She accommodates 10 to 12 guests. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons/)

A 32-foot tender is part of the yacht’s toy box, and the crew include a scuba instructor, a Jet Ski instructor and a massage therapist.

Are scuba divers welcome aboard Lionshare? Yes, they are. For divers with certification, the yacht offers gear for as many as five people.

How to book a week on board: Contact a charter broker at camperandnicholsons.com

The First Zeelander Z72 is Delivered

The Zeelander Z72's top speed is about 40 knots.
The Zeelander Z72's top speed is about 40 knots. (Jeff Brown/)

Zeelander Yachts in the Netherlands has delivered Hull No. 1 of its new flagship, the Z72, to an American owner.

Designer Cor D. Rover inked the Z72’s lines, which include an S-shape sheerline, a wider stern than previous models, and more curved surfaces. Owners can choose the yacht’s exterior paint colors, with metallic and diamond-encrusted finishes available.

Noteworthy features include a 110-square-foot swim platform with an optional hot tub aft, as well as a side-entry garage sized for a tender, Seabobs and a WaveRunner (Hull No. 1 carries an 11-foot Williams Turbojet 325; Zeelander says the Z72 can handle a 16-footer). In the salon, there’s a sunroof as well as a retractable window aft for extra natural light and fresh air.

Note the volume in the forepeak master stateroom. That's a king-size berth.
Note the volume in the forepeak master stateroom. That's a king-size berth. (Jeff Brown/)

Belowdecks are three staterooms including a master with a king-size berth.

Power is triple 1,000-horsepower Volvo Penta IPS1350s for what Zeelander says is a top speed of 40 knots.

The owner of Hull No. 1 likes to party: He equipped his Z72 with extra lights and what Zeelander calls "the biggest JL sound system." It can play tunes everywhere on board, including at the swim platform.

For more information, visit: zeelander.com

Mazu's Dashing Dayboat

The Mazu 42 ST has a steeply raked, single-flat-panel windshield that plays a role in her rugged appearance.
The Mazu 42 ST has a steeply raked, single-flat-panel windshield that plays a role in her rugged appearance. (Courtesy Mazu Yachts/)

A Turkish owner ­commissioned the Mazu 42 ST to ferry him from the European side to the Asian side of the Bosporus Strait in Istanbul. The boat’s pronounced military-style exterior surrounds a cabin with a double berth and head, as well as wraparound seating in the bow. Twin 435 hp Volvo Penta IPS600s power this vessel to a top-end speed of 47 knots and a cruise speed of 32 knots.

Whom It's For: You don't need to be a ­Turkish tycoon to own the Mazu 42 ST. Her amenities and performance make her an option for anyone in the market for a dayboat with partial carbon-fiber construction and a 2-foot-9-inch draft that is ­shallow enough for sandbar ­hopping.   ­

Picture  This: It's a roasting summer day in Miami. All you want to do is get away from dry land and escape to Biscayne Bay's soothing aegis. Your Mazu 42 ST bobs at the dock, ready to whisk you and your friends away for a day of fun in the summertime sun.

Take the next step: mazuyachts.com

Custom Line 106 Debuts in Italy

Depending on powerplants, the Custom Line 106 has a reported top speed ranging from 23 to 26 knots.
Depending on powerplants, the Custom Line 106 has a reported top speed ranging from 23 to 26 knots. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

The Custom Line 106 made her debut recently at the Venice Boat Show in Italy.

A planing yacht, the Custom Line 106 was created in cooperation with designer Francesco Paszkowski. Interiors were developed with Paszkowski and Margherita Casprini.

According to Custom Line, the yacht has nearly 2,400 square feet of exterior sole surfaces, all interconnected. The flybridge is connected to the bow through a port [walkway|], while a starboard walkway leads to the cockpit (which also connects to the flybridge, via a stairway). Up on the flybridge, there’s a hardtop with two skylights.

The Custom Line 106's modern interior design is from Francesco Paszkowski and Margherita Casprini.
The Custom Line 106's modern interior design is from Francesco Paszkowski and Margherita Casprini. (Courtesy Custom Line/)

The stern has a Dual Mode Transom system with two sliding doors that cover the stairs when the yacht is underway, creating a cleaner profile.

Inside, the windows in the salon are sole-to-ceiling, and owners can request an electrically opening central window. The support columns serve as housing for lighting, audio and air conditioning systems. There are five staterooms for guests.

What about performance? According to Custom Line, the twin MTU 16V 2000 M86 engines push the 106 to a cruising speed of 20 knots and a maximum speed of 23 knots. Opting for M96Ls increases those figures to 22 and 26 knots, respectively.

For more information, visit: customline-yacht.com

Vripack, Nobiskrug Collaborate on Hybrid Concept

Vripack's 183-foot concept yacht design includes hybrid power and a substantial amount of structural glass.
Vripack's 183-foot concept yacht design includes hybrid power and a substantial amount of structural glass. (Courtesy Vripack/)

The yacht design firm Vripack, in the Netherlands, and the yachtbuilder Nobiskrug, in Germany, have collaborated on a 183-foot hybrid concept yacht.

Styling is unconventional, with inspiration coming from high-end residences in Hong Kong and Dubai, and with a young Middle Eastern or Asian owner in mind. The layout includes four equal-size staterooms on one side, and an open-plan gymnasium on the other, all near an asymmetric hallway.

“What is prime is the flow of people on board, and how the layout is completely derived from giving the maximum user experience,” Vripack co-Creative Director Marnix Hoekstra stated in a press release. “Hallways are shaped wider when you enter them and narrower when you exit, so that it draws you in; the shape invites you on board.”

Structural glass makes up a substantial portion of the concept, including a glass balustrade that runs the length of the yacht.

“It’s a project that takes glass to the next level, optimizing all that the material has to offer,” Joost Mertens, a Vripack designer, stated in the same press release. “All the side walls of the superstructure are made of glass. There is no metal at all. The design is not constrained by any traditional yachting design rules.”

A new power idea: The hybrid propulsion system was developed for the concept. Vripack says the engines are "pancake-like," going flat and wide instead of up, so as not to affect the design of the yacht itself.

For more information, visit: vripack.com

Azimut to Debut Yacht Trio

Azimut Yachts is debuting its Grande S10, Flybridge 78 and Atlantis 45 at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

Azimut’s S10, the builder’s new S class flagship, was designed by Alberto Mancini (exterior) and Francesco Guida (interior), as they reportedly drew inspiration from other mega-yachts, a villa on the Italian Riviera and sports cars. The S10’s bridge was designed in partnership with Naviop and is described as “ultra-high-tech” by the manufacturer. This 94-footer’s construction is made of carbon fiber and glass-reinforced plastic.

Azimut's new S class flagship is designed with four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks.
Azimut's new S class flagship is designed with four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks. (Azimut Yachts/)

The S10 has four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks, and two cabins for crew. Power is twin MTU 2,600 hp diesels. The builder reports a top speed of 35 knots.

The Azimut 78 Fly’s exterior was also designed by Mancini, and Achille Salvagni designed the interior. Within the 78, the salon and dining area are combined into a single space. The area is flanked by sole-to-ceiling windows. There are four staterooms, including a full-beam master with his-and-her sinks, and one cabin accommodating up to three crew.

Azimut's Flybridge 78 is the Italian boatbuilder's first flybridge model to be equipped with triple Volvo Penta IPS propulsion.
Azimut's Flybridge 78 is the Italian boatbuilder's first flybridge model to be equipped with triple Volvo Penta IPS propulsion. (Azimut Yachts/)

This is Azimut’s first flybridge model to be equipped with triple Volvo Penta IPS propulsion: Standard power is triple IPS1200s (900 hp), and optional triple IPS1350s (1,000 hp) is available. Top speed is a reported 33 knots. The 78 can cruise up to a reported 26 knots.

Azimut’s Atlantis 45 design was crafted in partnership with Neo Design for both its interior and exterior. The transom garage accommodates an 8-foot tender, and the swim platform can handle a 9-foot-plus tender. Owner and guest staterooms are both full-beam and are separated by the centrally located galley-dinette combo belowdecks.

The Atlantis 45 is making its international debut at the 2019 Cannes Yachting Festival. It can cruise at a reported 28 knots and has a reported top hop of 33 knots.
The Atlantis 45 is making its international debut at the 2019 Cannes Yachting Festival. It can cruise at a reported 28 knots and has a reported top hop of 33 knots. (Azimut Yachts/)

The 45’s power comes from twin Volvo Penta IPS600s (435 hp). The yacht tops out at a reported 33 knots and cruises at a reported 28 knots.

For more information, visit: azimutyachts.com

Owner-Operator Cruiser

Horizon’s V-series yachts, including this V68, can be outfitted with an open or enclosed flybridge.
Horizon’s V-series yachts, including this V68, can be outfitted with an open or enclosed flybridge. (Courtesy Horizon/)

Horizon did many things right with its V68.

Those things start with the salon layout. Sure, the salon is where we entertain, but oftentimes it’s for lounging, and the L-shaped settee faces a 50-inch TV in the corner. It’s not a pop-up or swing-down unit that makes you crane your neck to see it, but instead sits right in front of you, just like at home. Two bucket chairs add to the layout’s flexibility, and a wet bar in the after corner is situated for serving guests in the salon and cockpit.

That cockpit is nearly 11 feet long from the salon doors to the settee. And the salon doors fold—not slide—out of the way, while the half-window abaft the wet bar swings up, further joining the two spaces.

The layout of the country-kitchen-style galley forward reflects the other things we do aboard: eat, drink and hang out. A raised dinette is forward under the windshield. One countertop is to starboard with a Jenn-Air induction cooktop. Another countertop is aft with a high backsplash, and there’s a double-duty island that, by using the tall seats from the dinette, becomes a bar with a foot rail. Whoever is doing the cooking gets to be part of the action in the open living area that stretches 48 feet from the cockpit to the forward dinette, while the skipper has a pantograph door to the portside deck, with gentle steps to the bridge.

Designed by Jonathan Quinn Barnett, naval architect Christian Stimson and the Horizon team, the V68 carries her 19-foot-5-inch beam far forward to a plumb bow, giving her a waterline length of 66 feet, 1 inch, about 3 feet longer than her bigger sister, the V72. The result is increased interior volume, especially in the lower deck accommodations, and particularly in the forward VIP.

The Horizon V68 gives guests numerous places to hang out, whether at the bow, inside or up top on the flybridge.
The Horizon V68 gives guests numerous places to hang out, whether at the bow, inside or up top on the flybridge. (Courtesy Horizon/)

Heading below from the galley, steps lead down to a foyer with a hidden washer and dryer. The foyer has an inlaid pale-oak sole with black China-fir accents, a theme repeated throughout the yacht. The stateroom forward is in an area usually defined (and constrained) by a sharply tapering bow, but with the V68’s plumb bow, there is walk-around space on each side of the queen berth; and there’s a pair of nightstands, which are unusual on a yacht of this length. The en suite head with a shower ­doubles as the yacht’s day head.

Aft, the light and bright master stateroom spans the beam with a centerline king berth, love seat and desk/vanity. The master head is forward to starboard, allowing space for a private companionway from the foyer, and a ­walk-in closet to port.

The guest stateroom is also off the foyer, with twin berths separated by a nightstand. The berths slide together into a double, revealing a previously hidden nightstand. Like the other staterooms, this one has an en suite head.


Read More: Visiting the Horizon Factory in Taiwan


Horizon offers a multitude of alternate layouts, ­including four staterooms on the lower deck, several iterations of the main deck including a lower helm, and an open or closed bridge.

The V68 that I got aboard had a bridge that was a fine choice between enclosed and open: a full enclosure with Strataglass vinyl panels that unzipped and swung up to tailor the amount of indoor/outdoor exposure. A nice touch was the day head aft. Bridge seating included a wraparound settee with a teak table opposite a built-in love seat, and the boat deck aft had room for lounges and seating to taste. Just abaft the dinette were a propane grill, sink and fridge. Some owners may want to use the open real estate on the deck for a tender; Horizon has ­reinforced and prewired the area for a davit.

The helm provides clear sightlines.
The helm provides clear sightlines. (Courtesy Horizon/)

Forward, the bow has two lounges (the forward sun pad flips up) around a table. Aft, there’s a beach club with a wet bar and raised settee under the hydraulically opening transom. The area abaft the engine room can be used for stowage or as a crew cabin with a single berth, head and shower.

Power for the V68 is a pair of 1,135 hp Caterpillar C18 Acert diesels, which push the yacht to just over 25 knots with an 18-knot cruise. Drop the throttles back, and the 9-knot range is more than 800 nautical miles, making the V68 a contender for cruising down-island as well as for making West Coast hops from California to Cabo or Alaska.

Standard equipment includes a pair of 29-kW Onan gensets, ABT-Trac stabilizers, and bow and stern thrusters. The engine room is right: There are even small lights behind the fuel filters, to let owner-operators check for contaminants without juggling a flashlight.

Those kinds of details make it hard not to like the Horizon V68, a yacht that gets so many things right.

Take the next step: horizonyachtusa.com

Best of Grenada

Shadel Nyack Compton grew up playing all around Belmont Estate, now an agritourism destination on Grenada.
Shadel Nyack Compton grew up playing all around Belmont Estate, now an agritourism destination on Grenada. (Zach Stovall/)

As she welcomes more than 30,000 visitors a year to her family’s Belmont Estate on Grenada, owner Shadel Nyack Compton takes great joy in seeing them retrace her childhood wanderings through the verdant grounds of the 17th-century plantation. “My grandparents allowed us to explore every nook and cranny of the estate,” she says. “I loved strolling through the acres of cocoa and nutmeg trees.”

During the past 12 years, Nyack Compton has transformed what was a struggling agricultural concern into an agritourism destination, earning recognition as one of the Caribbean’s top entrepreneurs in the process. The estate indulges the senses with lush gardens, organic chocolates made on-site (a tree-to-bar tour explains the process) and Creole specialties such as callaloo soup served in the farm-to-table restaurant.

“We try to give visitors an authentic experience that embodies Grenadian history, culture, heritage and agriculture all packaged beautifully together,” she says.

  • What drove you to transform Belmont Estate? My grandparents had defied the norm by being the first Indo-Grenadians to own a plantation. Belmont Estate was so rich in heritage and history that I couldn't simply allow it to decay. Reviving it was the best way to honor my grandparents and contribute to the local economy.
  • What does Belmont's motto, "History in the Making," mean to you? The estate evolved out of the institution of slavery, but we have made it into something positive, wholesome and educational, and we are continuing to make history here.
  • What is your favorite flavor of chocolate made at Belmont? The Pure Grenada is a delicate blend of cinnamon, ginger, mace and nutmeg in a 60 percent chocolate bar, so it's very dark with just a bit of sweetness and milk. It embodies Grenada's history as the Spice Island.

Shadel's Must-Do List on Grenada

  • Grand Etang National Park and Forest Preserve (St. Andrew): With its densely forested mountains, imposing lake and mischievous mona monkeys, it is a surreal and majestic experience.
  • Sails Restaurant and Bar (St. George's): It has spectacular panoramic views and extraordinary Caribbean-fusion fare. The Indian tali is yummy.
  • Yolo Sushi and Wine Bar (St. George’s): It has great service and food, with delicious vegan options. It’s in Port Louis, one of the most beautiful spots in St. George’s.

E-Scooter Onboard

The trim (shown in standard “azzurro elettrico” blue) on Vespa’s Elettrica can be customized in six colors.
The trim (shown in standard “azzurro elettrico” blue) on Vespa’s Elettrica can be customized in six colors. (Courtesy Vespa/)

Vespa scooters, which Piaggio makes in Italy, have been icons of European style since the first model premiered in 1946. Countless mega-yachts carry Vespas on deck and in lazarettes for launching onto the roads from Antibes to Monaco. Americans have long loved Vespa’s style too; Hollywood A-listers dating back to Charlton Heston, Audrey Hepburn, John Wayne and Marlon Brando have ridden them on- and off-screen for decades.

Now comes the 21st-century incarnation of the Vespa. Called Elettrica and priced at about $7,200, it is the first silent, electric-powered, zero-carbon-emissions model from the manufacturer. As Vespa puts it, the Elettrica is “a work of art with a technological heart that is born as the symbol of our modern times and the years to come.”

The Elettrica’s power unit can produce continuous juice at 3.5 kW and peak power of 4 kW, allowing for performance that Vespa says is superior to that of a traditional 50cc scooter’s, especially when accelerating or going uphill. Riders have a choice of three modes: eco, power and reverse. In eco mode, speed is limited to about 18 mph, to conserve battery power. Top speed is 30 to 40 mph, as with many traditional 50cc scooters.

Later this year: Vespa plans to introduce a hybrid gas-electric X version of the Elettrica with a range of nearly 124 miles.
Later this year: Vespa plans to introduce a hybrid gas-electric X version of the Elettrica with a range of nearly 124 miles. (Courtesy Vespa/)

The lithium-ion battery recharges with a plug and takes four hours to store a charge that allows for a range of 62 miles—an efficiency that Vespa says will happen without maintenance for 1,000 charging cycles, or about 31,000 to 43,500 miles of use.

In true ­21st-century style, the Elettrica and some of its ­accessories connect to an app. That includes the backpack (shown at left), which has LED piping that can be turned on and off via the app for safety when riding at night. The Vespa app also can be set up to provide push notifications about the scooter’s battery status, statistics on the rider’s 30 most recent trips and number of battery recharge cycles to date.

Digital information for riders is also presented on a 4.3-inch TFT screen, which has four brightness levels and a twilight sensor for switching to night mode. The screen shows typical dashboard information such as battery-charge level and residual range.

Ferretti's New Flybridge

The Ferretti Yachts 720 is an option for owners between the Italian builder’s 670 and 780 models.
The Ferretti Yachts 720 is an option for owners between the Italian builder’s 670 and 780 models. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

Versatile. It's the word that came to mind as I scanned early images of the Ferretti Yachts 720's outdoor spaces.

Take the full-beam teak swim platform and transom garage, for example. Flip up the top half of the garage, and there’s stowage for a couple of Seabobs. Close that door and flip down the whole garage to reveal a sun bed. Add some carbon-fiber poles in the swim platform’s corners, and there’s a sun shade to cool off the space. Additionally, the swim platform accommodates a tender up to about 13 feet in length.

The flybridge, constructed with carbon fiber and composite material, measures just under 330 square feet. The carbon fiber should reduce weight aloft, ensuring a steady ride on ­rougher days.

The salon has a U-shaped settee to port with another settee across. Light-colored fabrics, leathers and contrasting wood tones create a modern feel throughout the interior spaces.
The salon has a U-shaped settee to port with another settee across. Light-colored fabrics, leathers and contrasting wood tones create a modern feel throughout the interior spaces. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)The amidships master measures 215 square feet, spans the yacht’s 18-foot-4-inch beam and includes an en suite head abaft the berth to port. A ­walk-in closet is to starboard.
The amidships master measures 215 square feet, spans the yacht’s 18-foot-4-inch beam and includes an en suite head abaft the berth to port. A ­walk-in closet is to starboard. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

Hardtop options include a ­Bimini, a fixed-window top or a louvered ­version. I’ve seen the louvered setup and ­appreciate how an owner can dial in the degree of light desired, but they all have their merits, depending on the environs.

Extending over the cockpit, the after section of the flybridge can be ­outfitted with loose furniture of the owner’s choice. Forward and to port is a U-shaped dining area beneath the hardtop. Additional sun pads are forward of the helm.

The cockpit’s table is fitted with a bench across the transom and room for four loose chairs, handling about eight guests for dinner. If the evening requires something more formal, there is a dining table for eight, athwartships and to port, one step up from the salon. Nearly 360 degrees of glass extends from the top of the ­salon’s low-slung furniture to the ceiling, ­providing clean views from anywhere on the main deck.

The foredeck lounge can have a teak table between the ­seating spaces. The head of the sun pad pulls up to form a backrest, ­creating an alfresco dining area.
The foredeck lounge can have a teak table between the ­seating spaces. The head of the sun pad pulls up to form a backrest, ­creating an alfresco dining area. (Courtesy Ferretti Yachts/)

For owners who are cruising with friends and family, there is a four-stateroom, three-head layout, including an amidships en suite ­master flanked by hullside windows. In the forepeak is an en suite VIP stateroom. Abaft the VIP to port and starboard are guest staterooms with side-by-side berths. They share the third head just ­forward of the starboard-side room.

Standard power for the 720 will be 1,200 hp MAN V-8 diesels. However, Hull No. 1, which should be launching around the time you’re reading this, is getting optional 1,400 hp MAN V-12 ­diesels, providing a projected cruise speed of 28 knots and a 32-knot top hop.

Take the next step: ferretti-yachts.com

Style Redux: 1980′s Yacht Design Is Back?

It feels like the 80s all over again.
It feels like the 80s all over again. (Steve Haefele/)

Now what’s the purpose of that damn thing?” my pal Ed groused. That damn thing was a ­100-foot high-speed yacht burping up a rooster tail the size of Niagara Falls as it careened down the waterway.

“The afterdeck is a bed,” he said. “It’s completely ­impractical.”

“It doesn’t matter,” I replied as the Miami Vice theme song echoed in my head.

I penned a high-speed ride nearly as large as that boat in the 1980s and was summarily taunted by my peers for “­going Euro.” European chic was not so popular stateside back then. Members of the Greatest Generation were still moving the market, and they were driving traditional U.S. brands at low velocities.

“Tasteless,” Ed insisted as he considered the yellowed print of my design. “It looks like a suppository.”

“It seems it’s not the design that is dated, my friend. You are,” I scolded.

In fact, had my design made it to the water, she would seem rather common by today’s standards. Her interior specification called for a herd of Italian leather, a flock of ostrich hide, buckets of lacquer, and tightly woven sisal and wool ground cover. Proper yachts had white topsides in the 1980s, but hers were to be bathed with color: an annoying shade of red, as I recall, or was it yellow? She was aggressively rakish. Her design brief demanded that she look as though she were moving at flank speed while tethered alongside trendy dockside drinking holes.

These days, supersize speedboat technology has been pretty well sorted out. Back then, such a design was pushing the envelope. I infused my effort with high-speed, patrol-boat DNA with the help of a D.C. Beltway subcontractor. Her scantlings called for a tough, longitudinally framed aluminum hull and a lightweight, cored ­composite deck and superstructure. A pair of 16-cylinder diesels ­pumping hundreds of gallons per hour would have yielded 50 knots, and ­surface-piercing props would have provided the maximum visual effect.

Designer shades, white-­linen threads and lace leather ­slippers—those were the days.

“What’s old is new, Ed,” I said. “If I enclose the bridge, add a few winglets and a playpen on the afterdeck, and swaddle the lot in tinted glass, this design will be ready for prime time.”​

“A serious yachtsman would never cruise aboard such a boat,” Ed grunted in disgust.

“Cruise? How mundane. There’s much more to it than that,” I insisted. “Today’s savvy, ­style-conscious investor in yachts is a ­patron of the arts and sciences. These forward thinkers are not wafting through their ­retirement aboard a trawler at idle speed. They’re charging ahead, spawning exciting new innovations in design and ­performance. They are making a ­statement.”

“What happened to your patron of the arts and sciences? Did he ever make a statement?” Ed asked.​

“My client had to spend time ashore,” I explained. “The market was different in the 1980s. Fast-boat fans were more likely to be giving statements than making them. You do recall Crockett and Tubbs?”

Reviewed: Tiara 38 LS

The 38 LS’s fine entry and 20-degree transom deadrise proved solid on the salt.
The 38 LS’s fine entry and 20-degree transom deadrise proved solid on the salt. (Courtesy Tiara Sport/)

Just before this year’s boat shows in Miami, I had the chance to run the Tiara Sport 38 LS, part of a new ­series of outboard-powered vessels from the Michigan boatbuilder. The weather was blustery with spattering rainstorms dimpling Biscayne Bay’s gray chop. It wasn’t great boating weather, but it was great conditions for boat testing.

My test vessel was special because it unveiled a new propulsion package representing a partnership between Volvo Penta and Seven Marine. The optional helm-to-prop system combined Volvo Penta’s Electronic Vessel Control (EVC) with Seven Marine’s beastly 527 hp 6.2-liter V-8 outboard ­motors. Seven Marine brings the horses while Volvo Penta offers DuoProp drives and an amalgam of its “Easy Boating” features, including a Glass Cockpit System, joystick control, dynamic positioning and Easy Connect remote connectivity. (Triple outboards from Yamaha and Mercury ranging from 300 to 400 hp apiece are also available.)

The combination of the DuoProp system with the muscular motors is designed to push the ­growing ­series of monster center-consoles ­coming to market with more efficiency at all speeds. The setup also reduces cavitation, further enhancing performance, according to the manufacturers.

Four. That’s the number of engine options offered for the Tiara 38 LS. This vessel can be outfitted with triple Yamaha F300s, triple Yamaha F350s, triple 400 hp Mercury Verados or twin 527 hp Seven Marines.
Four. That’s the number of engine options offered for the Tiara 38 LS. This vessel can be outfitted with triple Yamaha F300s, triple Yamaha F350s, triple 400 hp Mercury Verados or twin 527 hp Seven Marines. (Courtesy Tiara Sport/)

The 38 LS handled the sloppy conditions in Florida well. A hardtop and single- pane windshield provided shelter from the elements, protecting the three bolster-style helm seats as well as the seating at the after end of the console.

I spent most of my wheel time running the 38 LS at her 30-knot cruise speed, where her range is 276 nautical miles. The boat sliced through the confused 2- and 3-footers while gripping tightly to the bay’s surface during S-turns and while turning hard over in about a boat length and change. When I pinned the throttles, the 38 LS shot up to a brisk 46-knot clip, just 2 knots shy of the 48 knots that Tiara Sport says it’s seen her do. It’s a speed that a center-console in today’s market needs to attain to stay competitive.

The 38 LS has a hardtop with a sunroof over the three helm seats. It extends far enough aft to shade the twin seats aft of the console, which flank a sink and a cutting board.
The 38 LS has a hardtop with a sunroof over the three helm seats. It extends far enough aft to shade the twin seats aft of the console, which flank a sink and a cutting board. (Courtesy Tiara Sport/)

The 38 LS also has the requisite amenities expected on today’s large ­center-consoles. The U-shaped dining settee at the transom is a good place for alfresco meals, while lounge ­seating in the bow is an ideal spot to hang out with sundowners. A full head is inside the console, and there’s a full-size berth for ­overnights.

The Tiara Sport 38 LS could function equally well as a dayboat or as a ­mega-yacht tender. She has performance-boat speed, a sharp profile and good looks without being overly trendy. She is ­unlikely to go out of style anytime soon.

Take the next step: tiarasport.com

Yacht Auction Option

Boathouse Auctions aims to eliminate the question of how many days, months or years it will take to sell a yacht.
Boathouse Auctions aims to eliminate the question of how many days, months or years it will take to sell a yacht. (istockphoto/alexandrbognat/)

Jason Dunbar was losing sleep. His friend owned the 106-foot Broward Altitude Adjustment II and wanted Dunbar, a broker with Luke Brown Yachts, to sell it. Dunbar knew the statistics on Browards: One sells, on average, every 66 days in America. Others had already sold for the year. The sale was likely to take longer than his friend wanted.

The factor of time suddenly became key to the sales equation. While some owners make price the key factor in a sale, hanging onto a yacht for years—and paying the carrying costs until they find a buyer—Dunbar’s friend most valued time. That’s why Dunbar became one of the first brokers to work with Boathouse Auctions, an online service that launched in October.

The site’s creator, Jack Mahoney, says he got the idea from a friend who does online auctions of high-end homes. The concept of an upcoming auction date, he says, creates urgency in the minds of buyers sitting on the sidelines, waiting for an owner to drop the price.

“We’re making an event out of something,” he says. “We solve the problem of time.”

The 106-foot Broward <em>Altitude Adjustment II</em>, built in 2006, was one of the first yachts to sign on with Boathouse Auctions.
The 106-foot Broward Altitude Adjustment II, built in 2006, was one of the first yachts to sign on with Boathouse Auctions. (Courtesy Boathouse Auctions/)

For the Broward—a boat that usually finds buyers, and thus makes for a good bet at auction—it worked. Because of the pre-auction buzz, a buyer came forward with an offer ahead of the sale date. Dunbar and Boathouse Auctions each took a commission, and both the buyer and seller, Dunbar says, felt like they got a deal; the owner saved time, and the buyer saved money.

“We sold it for about 5 percent below fair market value,” Dunbar says. “But, he may have eaten that 5 percent up in the normal bell curve of time. So if I look at how long, on average, it takes to sell a boat right now in America, it may have been a wash.”

How the Auction Process Works

  • A sales broker brings the yacht to the attention of Boathouse Auctions. (The auction house will not work directly with yacht owners.)
  • Promotions go online and a date is set for the yacht's sale at auction.
  • Boathouse Auctions takes a 5 percent commission, on top of the broker's commission. If the yacht sells prior to the auction date, then the seller pays the extra 5 percent to the auction house. If the yacht sells at auction, then the buyer pays the extra 5 percent to the auction house.

Sales So Far

As of early May, Boathouse Auctions had listed three yachts for auction. Two of them—a 106-foot Broward and an 86-foot Stephens—generated so much interest that the yachts sold prior to the auctions taking place.

That’ll Keep an Angler Warm and Dry

Gill's Tournament Pro3L FG100 jacket is made with three layers and has kill-cord attachment loops, an adjustable Vortex hood, and reflective accents. The hood is intended to solve several problems that anglers typically face. Retail price is $349.
Gill's Tournament Pro3L FG100 jacket is made with three layers and has kill-cord attachment loops, an adjustable Vortex hood, and reflective accents. The hood is intended to solve several problems that anglers typically face. Retail price is $349. (Courtesy Gill/)

Gill is not being shy about its new Tournament Pro3L FG100 jacket, calling it "the greatest innovation in fishing jacket design in company history."

The jacket is made with three layers and has kill-cord attachment loops, an adjustable Vortex hood, and reflective accents. The hood is intended to solve several problems that anglers typically face.

“Many of them wear a baseball or trucker style cap, hoodie and then the waterproof shell with the hood up,” Matt Clark, product development director, stated in a press release. “Hoods inflate, caps fly off, so, we got to work on developing a solution. The Vortex Hood has a three-channeled construction with air chutes built into the hood itself. One goes over the top of the head and exits at the rear of the collar, and two vent down the side of the hood and out through the collar. You get a slipstream effect, allowing air to enter the front and exit out the back.”

The effect is similar to what happens in aerospace design, he added.

“With an airplane wing, you get the vortex effect when wind travels faster over the top of the curved surface,” he stated. “So, over the top of the Vortex hood, wind speed accelerates and the air is sucked out the back of the hood.”

The three-layer fabric design has an outer face intended to handle scuffing and tough conditions, in addition to being water resistant. The inner layer is breathable and waterproof, and the layer closest to the skin picks up moisture so it will dry quicker.

What colors does the Gill Tournament Pro 3L FG100 come in? graphite and taupe, both of which are new. Retail price is $349.

For more information, visit: gillfishing.com

A ‘Turnkey Condition’ Hargrave

The 97-foot Hargrave <em>Inevitable</em> was built in 2003 and most recently refitted in 2018. Current asking price is $2,295,000.
The 97-foot Hargrave Inevitable was built in 2003 and most recently refitted in 2018. Current asking price is $2,295,000. (Courtesy Northrop & Johnson/)

Sales broker Whit Kirkland at Northrop & Johnson has listed the 97-foot Hargrave Inevitable for sale, at an asking price of $2,295,000.

Built in 2003 and most recently refitted in 2018, Inevitable is being marketed in "turnkey condition." Accommodations are for eight or nine guests in four staterooms, including a full-beam master.

Up on deck, the flybridge has a hardtop for helm protection, along with built-in guest seating and a barbecue. Dining is on the main deck aft.

According to Northrop & Johnson, the twin 1,400-horsepower Caterpillar engines provide a cruising speed of 16 knots.

How many crew does Inevitable accommodate? There's room for five.

Take the next step: northropandjohnson.com

New Kid In Town

The DutchCraft 56 can reach a reported top hop of 40 knots and can reportedly cruise for 500 nautical miles at 25 knots.
The DutchCraft 56 can reach a reported top hop of 40 knots and can reportedly cruise for 500 nautical miles at 25 knots. (Ben Sampson/)

DutchCraft says its 56-footer is all about ease of use.

The Netherlands-based boatbuilder started with replacing standard, high-maintenance teak with composite teak on the yacht’s decks. Whereas the former can slowly degrade without regular attention, DutchCraft says the latter requires only a high-pressure wash to make it look new again.

Additionally, the DutchCraft 56 has a durable, powder-coated metal rub rail. And the fiberglass hull and superstructure are built via sandwich-infusion construction. PVC coring adds strength without extra weight.

The 56 can be tailored for avid anglers, water-sports enthusiasts, cruisers and more.

For fishermen, optional modifications like a fighting chair, a bait well and a fish box can be added. There are also two benches aft with one locker unit each (19.7 x 5.4 feet; 9.8 x 5.4 feet) on the sides of the main deck that are capable of holding up to 16 full diving sets.

DutchCraft touts its newest vessel as a versatile yacht suitable for fishermen, water-sportsmen or socialites.
DutchCraft touts its newest vessel as a versatile yacht suitable for fishermen, water-sportsmen or socialites. (Jeff Brown/)

Hosting a party? This vessel’s beam is 16 feet 7 inches, comfortably accommodating up to 36 people in its Open version and up to 44 people in its Cabin version.

Lounging space can be found on two sun pads, with an optional, third sun pad available. The first one is on the foredeck, accommodates two people and transforms into a bench as well. On the flybridge, the six-seat dining table (Cabin version) transforms into a sun pad that accommodates four guests. The third and optional sun pad is on the aft deck, accommodates four guests and also converts into a bench.

The DutchCraft 56’s Open version has one forward windshield and seats up to 36 people.
The DutchCraft 56’s Open version has one forward windshield and seats up to 36 people. (Jeff Brown/)

Belowdecks are four staterooms, including a full-beam, en suite master with a 70-inch OLED TV, two other heads, a fridge, a freezer and laundry space with a washer and dryer. Headroom in the master stateroom is 6 feet, 4 inches.

The DutchCraft 56 has a reported top speed of 40 knots. The builder says it can cruise at 25 knots for 500 nautical miles or 750 nm, if owners opt for the extra fuel tank. Standard engines are Volvo Penta IPS-600/950, but there is an option for jet propulsion with John Deere 13.5L 1,500 hp and Doen Waterjets DJ152.

The DutchCraft 56 will debut in September at the Cannes Yachting Festival.

For more information, visit: dutchcraft.com

Heesen Delivers 164-Foot Masa

On a recent sea trial, the 164-foot Heesen <em>Masa</em> exceeded its contracted speed of 23 knots.
On a recent sea trial, the 164-foot Heesen Masa exceeded its contracted speed of 23 knots. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)

Heesen Yachts in the Netherlands has delivered the 164-foot Masa, the latest in the builder's 5000 Aluminum Class series.

During two days of trials in the North Sea, according to Heesen, the yacht “largely exceeded” the contractually obligated speed of 23 knots.

Cristiano Gatto handled interior design, which includes silver leaf ceilings, curved furniture and brushed spruce. Masa accommodates 12 guests in six ensuite staterooms, including the owner's space forward on the main deck.

<em>Masa</em>'s exterior was designed by Frank Laupman from Omega Architects.
Masa's exterior was designed by Frank Laupman from Omega Architects. (Courtesy Heesen Yachts/)

Frank Laupman of Omega Architects designed exteriors, and the owner chose a white color scheme by Awlgrip.

How does Heesen describe Masa's bow? The yacht has a pelican beak bow with negative sheer.

For more information, visit: heesenyachts.com

Meet the Leopard 53 PC

The Leopard 53PC is slated to debut at the Miami boat shows in February. She's designed for private use, and as part of The Moorings charter fleet.
The Leopard 53PC is slated to debut at the Miami boat shows in February. She's designed for private use, and as part of The Moorings charter fleet. (Courtesy Leopard Catamarans/)

Leopard Catamarans is preparing to introduce the fourth generation of its power catamarans with the Leopard 53 PC, which is expected to be in the United States in time for the Miami boat shows in February.

The model, which will replace the Leopard 51 PC in the builder’s lineup, will be built for private owners as well as for use in The Moorings fleet of charter boats.

“The Leopard 53 Powercat is not just a replacement of the previous model, but an evolutionary change in the Leopard powercat range,” Franck Bauguil, vice president of yacht sales and product development, stated in a press release. “This completely new boat is designed to please the existing Leopard owners and Leopard fans, but also to appeal to the more traditional motoryacht market with a modern, reimagined interior that offers the comforts of home as well as plenty of outdoor entertaining space. Combining this with the smart and economical advantages of catamaran design, she is easy to maintain and operate, and is up to 50 percent more fuel efficient than her monohull motoryacht counterparts.”

The flybridge has space for al fresco dining and for catching rays.
The flybridge has space for al fresco dining and for catching rays. (Courtesy Leopard Catamarans/)The salon takes full advantage of the yacht's 25-foot-2-inch beam. Note the nearly 360 degrees of glass.
The salon takes full advantage of the yacht's 25-foot-2-inch beam. Note the nearly 360 degrees of glass. (Courtesy Leopard Catamarans/)

Maximum range, according to the builder, is 2,000 miles; top speed is 25 knots, and cruising speed is 17.5 knots.

The flybridge has a fixed solid hardtop and seating that offers panoramic views. One level down, the cockpit has a table and walkaround seating. Owners can add an interior navigation station, and can choose a three- or four-stateroom layout with the option for crew cabins.

Where to charter the Leopard 53 Powercat: look for information with moorings.com and leopardcatamarans.com.

Quick Specs:

  • Length Overall: 53'1'"
  • Maximum Beam: 25'2"
  • Draft: 3'2" (half load)
  • Displacement: 41,070 (light ship)
  • Power: 2/370 mhp Yanmar 8LV370 diesels
  • Fuel Capacity: 562 gal.
  • Freshwater Capacity: 185 gal.
  • Top Speed: 25 knots
  • Cruise Speed: 17.5 knots
  • Range at Top Speed: 342 NM
  • Range at Cruise Speed: 463 NM

Top Fishing Tenders

Builders of today’s center-consoles are finding ways to pack in amenities that used to be available only aboard far larger oceangoing convertibles.
Builders of today’s center-consoles are finding ways to pack in amenities that used to be available only aboard far larger oceangoing convertibles. (Courtesy Boston Whaler/)

Big boats are nice, but ask nearly any yachtsman with a fleet, and he’ll tell you there’s great fun to be had on tenders. With the wind in your hair and a big fish tugging on your line, life doesn’t get much better. Efficient, ­rugged and fun, the fishing tender has come into its own and is now ­available with all kinds of features that used to be the exclusive province of ­larger siblings in the marina. Here are 15 choice picks, new for this season.

Pursuit S 288 Sport
Pursuit S 288 Sport (Courtesy Pursuit Boats/)

The S 288 is now the entry-level model in the builder’s four-hull Sport line, which ranges up to an S 408. At 30 feet length overall, the S 288 has room for many features found on her larger siblings.

  • Thrill of the Chase: With twin 300 hp Yamaha outboards, the S 288 can hit 48 knots. The engine package comes standard with the Yamaha Helm Master steering system and its Set Point feature, which has three modes that let skippers lock in a position, a heading or both.
  • Fully Loaded: Amenities aboard the S 288 include a hullside tuna/dive door, a transom livewell and dual in-sole fish boxes. Seating is aft and up front, so the crew can rest their legs between bouts with gamefish.

Take the next step: pursuitboats.com

Carolina Skiff Sea Chaser 24
Carolina Skiff Sea Chaser 24 (Courtesy Carolina Skiff/)

For more than 30 years, Carolina Skiff has built dependable vessels that are fun to drive and adept at bringing in fish. The builder offers more than 60 models, including its Sea Chaser line, which in itself has four series that range in length from 16 to 27 feet length overall.

  • Multitasker: The Sea Chaser 24 HFC stands out for her versatility; HFC stands for hybrid fish and cruise. She comes standard with features meant to please both types of boaters, including an insulated fish box, fold-down cleats, a stainless-steel anchor chock, LED lighting under the gunwale, a built-in lifting eye, stainless-steel cupholders and more. Capacity is 12 boaters, no ­matter whether they're lounging or wetting lines.

Take the next step: carolinaskiff.com

Edgewater 370cc
Edgewater 370cc (Courtesy Edgewater Boats/)

The Edgewater 370CC butts up against the monster-size center-console class at 37 feet long. The builder categorizes her in her own Yacht class, separate from its Heritage, Center Console and Crossover lines that max out at 32 feet length overall. The 370CC’s horsepower-to-size ratio of 9.2 pounds per horsepower makes her best in her class, according to the builder.

  • Take it to the Edge: The 370CC's options for customization ­include ­multiple hull colors, a 70-gallon in-transom livewell, a Garmin electronics package and a Fusion stereo system.
  • Speed Thrills: With triple 300 hp ­Yamaha outboards, the Edgewater can hit a top-end speed of 56 knots, according to the builder.

Take the next step: ewboats.com

Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence
Ocean Alexander 45 Divergence (Courtesy Ocean Alexander/)

Ocean Alexander has long had a reputation for constructing stout, bluewater-cruising motoryachts. Now the builder is applying that heritage to the center-console market with the 45 Divergence.

  • Divergent Thinking: Fit and finish, and in particular woodwork and leather stitching, are on par with the builder's motoryachts. Owners can customize each hull with more than 400 cosmetic variations.

Take the next step: oceanalexander.com

Grady-White Canyon 456
Grady-White Canyon 456 (Courtesy Grady-White/)

Grady-White has a sizable new flagship: the Canyon 456. The builder says that in designing this boat, it wanted to “reimagine the luxury sport-fishing yacht,” with the widest beam (14 feet) in its class allowing for literal boatloads of amenities and features on board. The 45-foot-long center-console displaces a cool 24,500 pounds sans engines.

  • Great White: The Canyon 456 is fitted out with cockpit boarding doors to port and starboard, a 459-quart insulated freezer box, a Seakeeper 6 gyrostabilizer, cushioned bow seating with ­backrests, and an enclosed head with a sink and shower (inside the console). The galley has Corian countertops and stainless-steel drawers, along with vertical rod stowage. The V-berth converts electromechanically from a bed to seating with a table, near a 32-inch TV and more rod stowage.

Take the next step: gradywhite.com

Scout 530 LXF
Scout 530 LXF (Courtesy Scout Boats/)

The Scout 530 LXF is the builder’s new flagship. Early inquiries left the builder expecting to be sold out for the first year after Hull No. 1 made her debut.

  • Vroom! She can have an array of engine setups, with four, five or six Mercury or Yamaha outboards up to 2,700 total horsepower. The blistering top-end is reportedly 65 knots.
  • Inside and Out: Scout worked with Fort Lauderdale-based Genesis Interiors on the European-style interior, with ideas taken from larger yacht builds. Other interesting touches include electrically raised rocket launchers and double hydraulic swim ­platforms that open to port and starboard. The 530 LXF also comes with a concierge: Company Capt. Josh Slayton delivers each 530 and makes sure each owner is comfortable with the boat.

Take the next step: scoutboats.com

Valhalla v37
Valhalla v37 (Courtesy Valhalla Boatworks/)

It was only a matter of time. Viking Yachts has been a dominant player in the fish-boat market for years, and now has rolled out Valhalla Boatworks, its foray into the burgeoning center-console sector.

  • Hero Status: Viking collaborated with Michael Peters Yacht Design to create this 36-foot-9-inch boat, which has a gently sloped sheerline. The boat can have twin, triple or quadruple outboards up to 1,200 hp. Customized installations of Seakeeper gyrostabilizer systems leave room for stowage, systems and more. A transom livewell, in-sole fish boxes and rod holders help to bolster this vessel's fishing cred, while the stepped hull should provide an airy ride with a firm grip on the sea.

Take the next step: valhallaboatworks.com

Solace 345
Solace 345 (Courtesy Solace Boats/)

Solace is a new boat company whose first model is the 345. Note the vessel’s unorthodox transom, which juts out between the twin Yamaha outboard engines, creating 5-foot flush access that leads to a hydraulically operated dive door. Just forward of there, to port and starboard, are ­folding benches that seat two people apiece. There’s also a three-person ­retractable bench that extends from the ­workstation.

  • Bug Out: Owners can choose an ­optional second workstation with a "folding buggy top" for protection from the elements.
  • Big Plans: The Edgewater, Florida, builder has 16 acres of space and plans to roll out a full line of models behind the 345. So get ready to say hi to the new guy.

Take the next step: solaceboats.com

Boston Whaler 210 Montauk
Boston Whaler 210 Montauk (Courtesy Boston Whaler/)

The 210 is the new flagship in Boston Whaler’s Montauk line. Like all Whalers, she’s “unsinkable,” and is also built for hose-and-go use, so owners can maximize their time on the water.

  • Whale of a Time: The 210 Montauk comes standard with a 150 hp Mercury FourStroke outboard and a galvanized-steel trailer with LED lighting and a swing tongue. Fishing options include rod holders, tackle drawers and a 30-gallon livewell; the optional fishing package adds a host of angling amenities.
  • Cruising Cred: Optional bow seating should make for an optimal place during sunset cruises. Five gelcoat colors are available for the hull while a teak package lets owners class up the joint.

Take the next step: bostonwhaler.com

Coastal Craft 33 Express
Coastal Craft 33 Express (Courtesy Coastal Craft/)

The Coastal Craft 33 Express is based on the Pacific Northwest builder’s 33 Profish. Like her sistership, the Express version is trailerable, has about 81 square feet of cockpit space to wet a line, and has two berths for spending the night on the hook in a favorite anchorage.

  • Ready To Run: The 33 Express can cruise at 30 knots for 400 nautical miles and hit 40 on the pins, according to the builder.

Take the next step: coastalcraft.com

Nor-Tech 390 Sport
Nor-Tech 390 Sport (Courtesy Nor-Tech Boats/)

Nor-tech has always toed the line between center-console and pure speedboat, and the 390 Sport is no exception. She has a scorching top-end of 70 knots with triple outboard Mercury 400R racing engines, according to the builder.

  • Fast Fishing: The 390 Sport has two tuna doors, an in-transom livewell and an array of rod holders dotting her gunwales. Garmin is a Nor-tech partner for outfitting helm electronics.
  • Have a Seat: U-shaped forepeak seating and twin lounges are forward of the console, giving guests and crew a place to stretch out in the sun. JL Audio can design the stereo setup of the owner's choice, and Nor-tech works with Lumishore on underwater lighting packages.

Take the next step: nor-techboats.com

World Cat 280DC-X
World Cat 280DC-X (Courtesy World Cat/)

World Cat says it has 80,000 customers aboard its boats worldwide, with the newest model from its 140,000-square-foot facility in North Carolina ­being the dual-console 280DC-X. It’s an ­evolution of the 280CC-X.

  • Cat Fish: With an optional angling package—­including a 20-gallon livewell and five ­hardtop-mounted rocket launchers—the World Cat becomes quite the fishing machine. Top speed for heading to the offshore fishing grounds is just shy of 40 knots, according to the builder.
  • Lounging Around: This catamaran has U-shaped seating in the bow with a filler cushion that creates a sun pad. Transom seating offers some protection if rougher weather begins to kick up.

Take the next step: worldcat.com

Belzona 32CC Tournament
Belzona 32CC Tournament (Courtesy Belzona Boats/)

Belzona bills its 32CC Tournament ­Edition as “the ultimate fishing machine.” The boat has full walkaround space and an army of rod holders. She also can be tricked out with outriggers, a Garmin electronics package and a marlin tower for better sightlines when chasing the big fish that this baby is meant to hunt.

  • Power to the People: The base-model 32CC is offered with twin 300 or 350 hp Mercury Verado outboards (and optional joystick controls). The Tournament ­Edition can jack up the power with a pair of 400 hp outboards.
  • In the Zone: The Belzona 32CC Tournament Edition has a full head with a shower (in the console) and wraparound seating in the forepeak.

Take the next step: belzonaboats.com

SeaVee 290B
SeaVee 290B (Courtesy SeaVee Boats/)

SeaVee constructed the 290B with a composite-cored hull to reduce weight while retaining a stiff, strong and quiet ride. The boat’s relatively small size also gives ­owners the ability to trailer her.

  • Deep-V: The 290B has a deep-V hull with 25 degrees of deadrise at the transom and a fine entry. Speeds range to 60 knots. Draft is just 20 inches, allowing for some ­skinny-water fishing too.

Take the next step: seaveeboats.com

Intrepid 345 Nomad
Intrepid 345 Nomad (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

Intrepid bases many of its designs on customer feedback, and that’s what happened with the 345 Nomad. Its composite T-top has a full-height wraparound glass windshield for protection against sun and spray. Owners can choose from two console options: a side entry with that standard T-top, or a front entry with the builder’s optional, traditional, aluminum T-top. Standard features include an inward-opening dive door, a fold-under swim ladder, an insulated fishbox and an integrated motor bracket for twin or triple outboard-engine configurations. Rod lockers are forward to port and starboard. Fender stowage and transom storage wells are also standard.

  • Go Fish: The 345 Nomad has six rocket launchers on the after end of her hardtop and can be fitted with outriggers.

Take the next step: intrepidpowerboats.com

Big-Game, Big Yacht

The Baglietto 43m Explorer can reach a reported top speed of 15 knots on twin 1,450 hp Caterpillar C32 Acert diesels.
The Baglietto 43m Explorer can reach a reported top speed of 15 knots on twin 1,450 hp Caterpillar C32 Acert diesels. (Courtesy Baglietto/)

Baglietto says its new 43m Explorer is a "sportfishing" mega-yacht.

For the avid angler, who likes comfort when not chasing down dinner, there is room for a 28-foot sportfisherman and a 20-foot tender on the yacht’s upper deck’s after section.

Speaking of the upper deck (and comfort), there is about 645 square feet of real estate here dedicated to the master stateroom with a view forward through three rectangular windows. There’s also a studio, a dressing room and a his-and-her head.

This 140-foot explorer vessel will be built with a steel hull and an aluminum superstructure. Design inspiration comes from a combination of other yachts, work boats and even warships.

The 43m Explorer can be tailored to an owner’s wants and needs, and most of the exterior is built modular, including an outdoor dining area on the upper deck that can be enclosed with sliding glass doors, allowing for an array of layout options.

There is an upper-deck helm with three forward-facing seats, and above this space is a sun deck with a furnished sunbed area, accessible via an external staircase.

The main deck has a full-beam salon and ceiling-high windows.
The main deck has a full-beam salon and ceiling-high windows. (Courtesy Baglietto/)The master stateroom has a forward view through three rectangular windows.
The master stateroom has a forward view through three rectangular windows. (Courtesy Baglietto/)

The main deck has a full-beam salon with ceiling-high windows. Because the tender and sportfisherman reside on the after section of the upper deck, this version of the 43m Explorer replaces its main-deck garage with a shaded conversation space. That space is also connected to the swim platform for easy water access.

Belowdecks, there are four guest staterooms, each with en suite heads, and two cabins for crew. There is also a wine cellar on this deck, and owners can choose its size and capacity. The sportfishing version of this vessel also comes with a cold room for stowing your catch.

Powered with twin 1,450 hp Caterpillar C32 Acert diesels, the 43m Explorer should reach a reported top speed of 15 knots. The builder says the yacht has a 5,000 nautical-mile range at 11 knots and 5,500 nm at 10 knots on its 13,200-gallon fuel tank.

For more information, visit: baglietto.com

Oceanco Delivers 295-Foot Yacht

<em>DreAMBoat</em> has accommodations for 23 guests and 33 crew. There is a nearly 20-foot-long swimming pool on the main deck aft, and there's an outdoor cinema space. There is also a private hot tub on the owner's deck, a spa on the bridge deck aft, and a custom-built diving board.
DreAMBoat has accommodations for 23 guests and 33 crew. There is a nearly 20-foot-long swimming pool on the main deck aft, and there's an outdoor cinema space. There is also a private hot tub on the owner's deck, a spa on the bridge deck aft, and a custom-built diving board. (Courtesy Oceanco/)

Oceanco in the Netherlands has delivered the 295-foot DreAMBoat, with exteriors by Espen Øino and interior design by Terence Disdale, marking the first time the two renowned designers have collaborated.

The owner purchased the yacht after the hull and superstructure were completed—timing that allowed delivery within 18 months of the purchase.

DreAMBoat has what Oceanco calls "generous overhangs" from the superstructure. She also has bulwark cutouts, and a carbon canopy mast house and mast.

“The exterior design was intended to be understated and timeless,” Øino stated in a press release. “At the launch, she came out of the facilities looking strong and proud with a lot of presence. The exterior deck areas flow seamlessly into the interior spaces, maintaining continuity and consistency. The external decks offer a variety of living spaces and experiences, with the sun deck probably being the biggest in its class with ample space for entertainment and lounging both in the shade and in the sun.”

At 2,950 gross tons, the yacht’s volume allows accommodations for 23 guests and 33 crew. Guests can use a nearly 20-foot-long swimming pool on the main deck aft, and there’s an outdoor cinema space. There is also a private hot tub on the owner’s deck, a spa on the bridge deck aft, and a custom-built diving board.

Inside are bespoke surfaces, natural wood, limestone soles, semiprecious stones, parchment, leather and mother-of-pearl.

"We always strive to avoid the big wow factor that soon becomes boring," Disdale stated in the press release. "We believe that DreAMBoat, with her quietly sophisticated interior, is indeed a future classic."

What is DreAMBoat's ECO-IHM designation? It stands for inventory of hazardous materials and means there's a commitment to eco-friendly operations, beyond complying with regulations.

For more information, visit: builtbyoceanco.com

$5 Million Price Drop on Recently Refitted Yacht

The 136-foot Lagniappe has a reported 2,200-nautical-mile range at 10 knots. Top speed: 16 knots.
The 136-foot Lagniappe has a reported 2,200-nautical-mile range at 10 knots. Top speed: 16 knots. (Denison Yacht Sales/)

Broker Chris Daves at Denison Yachting says the owner of the 136-foot Intermarine Lagniappe has dropped his asking price by $5 million, and is now offering the yacht at $6.9 million.

Lagniappe is a 1999 build that had what the brokerage firm calls an "extensive refit" in 2018. A 20-year ABS survey was just completed, the engines are rebuilt, and she has received a full paint job along with updated electronics and interior soft goods.

According to the brokerage firm, Lagniappe has a cruising speed of 13 knots and a top hop of 16 knots. At 10 knots, her range is reportedly 2,200 nautical miles.

Where is Lagniappe lying? The yacht is in Fort Lauderdale.

For more information, visit: denisonyachtsales.com

Can of Curves

The fastest way to a finished yacht is a straight line.
The fastest way to a finished yacht is a straight line. (Steve Haefele/)

The builder claims wipers for the curved windshield are very expensive,” Bill’s email read. “What do you think?” He had CC’d his informal and unpaid advisory team, of which I am apparently a member.

Bill has invested quite a bit in his new build, and having failed at talking him out of it, I figured I could still help him save a buck. I had survived a career wandering shipyards as a yacht designer by avoiding the use of my prized set of Copenhagen ship curves, which came by the dozens for drawing lines just so. It was a time when curved surfaces on yachts were more common below the waterline than above it, if only because yards wanted to save time and cash.

I understood Bill’s builder’s message perfectly. You like curves? Send more money, or else! I made a crude adjustment to Bill’s windshield design on my computer screen, sponging away the cylindrical section of the windshield and replacing it with a simple, optically superior glazing solution: a line segment. I explained that a flat piece of glass would cost less and improve the view.

Bill insisted that fussing with an important styling cue could compromise the design.

I had worked for such a man as a young designer. Shapely profiles were, in fact, his “designer’s signature.” To him, the simple, dimensional drawings that were typically provided so that a builder could cobble a superstructure were inadequate. His complex creations often required a lines drawing and lofting to full size, the same method used for designing and building the vessel’s hull. I’d suggest to him that builders would likely ignore our complicated drawings and cut corners. “It’s a matter of principle,” he’d insist.

My suspicions were confirmed when I eventually hung my own shingle and took on a builder of large motoryachts as a client. In those days, yacht designers had 56 Copenhagen ship curves and weighted splines to create complication. Before I put ink to paper, the builder made it clear that if I wished to keep the account and wander the production floor safely, I would adopt the yard’s ­standard. A bit of shape in the sheer and stem were considered a necessary expense, but the ­preferred drawing tool was the straightedge. I hid my ship curves.

Read More: Tell Tales

Ironically, it is likely that Copenhagen ship curves evolved from the full-size templates early builders had used. In the design office, they were used for shaping and ­fairing hull sections and stems. Weighted splines were used for fairing waterlines and buttocks lines and for shaping sensible sheer lines. Given the nature of the sea and the complications of hydrostatics and hydrodynamics, most builders deferred to the designer’s judgment on such matters. At the time, yacht designers were responsible for more than creating styling cues.

Until yacht imagineers can burp up a 3D-printed yacht, ­today’s CNC routers and ­plasma cutters can speed up construction—but curves still add complication and, in turn, cost.

Bill knows this, but he is a man of principle. We will have to see how much principle he’s willing to exhaust on his cylindrical windshield and custom wipers.

Brokerage: Mochi Craft Dolphin 44

We saw 29.5 knots on the pins, with a dirty hull bottom. With a clean hull, Mochi Craft reported a 32-knot top speed.
We saw 29.5 knots on the pins, with a dirty hull bottom. With a clean hull, Mochi Craft reported a 32-knot top speed. (Courtesy Ferretti Group/)

Mochi Craft took on a big challenge when it reimagined an American tradition: the lobster boat. It did so with style, creating a yacht with ­radius curves, flowing lines and eye-catching hull colors.

Our test 44, the smallest of five Mochi models from 44 to 74 feet in length, had twin 575 hp Volvo Penta diesels.

There were two staterooms, including an amidships master, and two heads.

At press time, seven Mochi Craft Dolphin 44s were on the brokerage market, ranging from $319,400 for a 2006 model to $437,072 for a 2008 version.

The Lure of Success

Sport fishermen turn to Kauai’s John “Bird” Miner for handcrafted lures and rods.
Sport fishermen turn to Kauai’s John “Bird” Miner for handcrafted lures and rods. (Kristin Baird Rattini/)

John “bird” miner, founder of Hawaiian Sea Lures and Hawaiian ­Custom Rods, flips through fish photos on his phone with the same button-busting pride as a new parent. “This was the biggest ahi in Hawaii in 2018, caught on one of my lures,” he says. “This catch was from the Blue Marlin World Cup Championship.”

Since launching his handcrafted lure line in 1990, Miner has developed a devoted following among big-game anglers, with customers from Australia to Gabon to the Northern ­Mariana Islands. His vivid lures—with equally colorful names such as “Ice Man” and “Dirty Man”—are a fixture at Bisbee’s Black & Blue marlin tournament and other major cups.

He doesn’t have to look far for inspiration for his new creations. From his home studio in Hanapepe, Kauai, he can watch the ­Pacific waves roll in on the island’s southwest shore. At night, he can sometimes be found in those same waters, scooping up mullet that he dries and encases in some of his best-selling lures.

Read More: Island Icon

“When it comes out of the mold, a lure looks rough,” he says. “But once I sand and polish to bring out that shine and luster, and I add the skirt, it’s a wow moment.”

How did you get the nickname "Bird"? I grew up in Rhode Island. As a kid, when I'd say my last name, it sounded like "myna," like the bird. It stuck. I now name a lot of my lures after different birds.

How did you get into lures? A friend wouldn't lend me his lure, so I decided to make my own, and they sold. I've always been good with my hands, and my dad was an artist, so I like to think I got some of my talent from him.

What do you ­enjoy about your work? I'm a creator. I'm putting something in the sea that seems so natural that fish can't tell the difference. That's thrilling.

BVI Bliss

The author’s chartered Aquila 44 approaches Sandy Spit, a sandbar just off Jost Van Dyke.
The author’s chartered Aquila 44 approaches Sandy Spit, a sandbar just off Jost Van Dyke. (Zach Stovall/)

I have showered open-airon the stern at daybreak. I have seen gleaming white yachts in sizes ranging from humble to mega; some with sails, some without, and some on which sails could be put, but the owner couldn’t be bothered to do so. I have seen clouds alight in a Pantone guide’s worth, only to be mirrored by a metallic, ­shimmering sea.

My quartet of shipmates from Tennessee and I have taken a weeklong hiatus from our day jobs to live out the lyrics of any country song involving boats and sand here in the British Virgin Islands. On this sunny, 83-degree day—as every day ­promises to be here—our Caribs are going down cold and the radio is cranked on the flybridge of Jewel Box, a brawny, three-stateroom Aquila 44 powercat from MarineMax Vacations.

She’s pointed toward Virgin Gorda while on our circuitous route through green hills that rise forth from turquoise waters.

From Left: The 3-foot-3-inch draft (top) helps in skinny water and the is 44 easy for a couple to handle (bottom). The Baths are a BVI must-do.
From Left: The 3-foot-3-inch draft (top) helps in skinny water and the is 44 easy for a couple to handle (bottom). The Baths are a BVI must-do. (Zach Stovall/)

At the helm sits Parker, a distinguished man who would not look out of place with epaulets on his shirt. His wife, Karen, is our resident snorkel goddess, and he is flanked by Matt and Milka, a couple contractually obligated to blend pina coladas to perfection. I am the fifth wheel, pressed into service as first-assistant buoy wrangler.

We tie up outside Spanish Town, teeing us up to be the first at daybreak to grab a coveted mooring ball at The Baths, the country's most recognizable natural wonder. We then celebrate our orientation aboard Jewel Box and first full day of BVI bareboating with sundowners at CocoMaya, a chic South Beach-inspired restaurant on the sand, and a must-see on any BVI cruise.

The next morning, I awake to Jewel Box's twin Volvo Pentas cranking all 520 horses, propelling us past the Club Med 2, a boutique cruise ship that just anchored, determined to inundate languorous beaches with acres of sun-seeking tourists. We quickly ready our snorkeling gear and dry bags, intent to swim ashore and have the granite grottoes mostly to ourselves. The boulders, rounded like giant river rocks, are piled at the edge of the sea. The experience of ­exploring their intimate passages is majestic, especially before the rest of the day's sightseer rush begins.

Clockwise from top left: Fresh Anegada lobster. Hiking in The Baths. Snorkeling at Norman Island. Pina Coladas on the hook. Cruising off Jost Van Dyke.
Clockwise from top left: Fresh Anegada lobster. Hiking in The Baths. Snorkeling at Norman Island. Pina Coladas on the hook. Cruising off Jost Van Dyke. (Zach Stovall/)

Our next stop is Anegada, where, looking to beat the tour groups on land too, we rent a Suzuki at the Anegada Beach Club. “Drive on the left. Keep it under 30. We have wild cows, wild sheep, wild donkeys and wild people. They all roam freely,” club owner Lawrence Wheatley says.

Regarded by some as the British Virgin Islands’ sleepy stepsister, Anegada’s an outlier not only for its physical distance from the chain, but also for its flat, featureless silhouette on the horizon. The 15-mile run from our overnight spot at Leverick Bay took an hour and 40 minutes, by Parker’s count.

After navigating the ship-swallowing reef that ­encircles the island, we’re hungry for a lobster lunch, which was promised to Matt and Milka long before we set foot in the BVI. Passing more cows than cars, we land at Big Bamboo on Loblolly Bay, a 10-mile ribbon of gleaming white sand fronted by the reef where our lunch once lived. As we wait for the lobsters to grill, we occupy ourselves with chilled Caribs and swing in woven chairs hung from seagrape trees.

Alas, even in paradise, we eventually have to press onward.

The view from Norman Island overlooking The Bight in the British Virgin Islands.
The view from Norman Island overlooking The Bight in the British Virgin Islands. (Zach Stovall/)

Next is Jost Van Dyke, where Matt, Parker and I stare at the last mooring ball, which is missing part of its pennant. Matt and I call “not it” to swim to the buoy and secure the boat. We surely have ­onlookers: A flotilla is anchored stern-to the sand, with skippers as eager to enjoy White Bay Beach as we are. A string of bars known for rum punch and cornhole is just above the high-water mark. There’s Seddy’s One Love, Ivan’s Stress-Free Bar and, of course, the Soggy Dollar, where Painkillers (the cocktail, not the pills) have eased seafarers’ ails for decades.

Our time sipping Painkillers under the palms is short, but effective, as Parker notes many other charters have cut and run for Peter Island's Great Harbour, a protected overnight anchorage minutes away. We follow suit, having a New York-style pizza on the beach, and later listening to a chorus of cocktail-inspired karaoke drift across from Foxy's Tamarind Bar while we watch shooting stars flash over Jewel Box's bow.

Clockwise from top left: Cocktails at Big Bamboo Bar on Anegada. Hiking on Norman Island. Rum punch at Corsair’s Beach Bar on Jost Van Dyke.
Clockwise from top left: Cocktails at Big Bamboo Bar on Anegada. Hiking on Norman Island. Rum punch at Corsair’s Beach Bar on Jost Van Dyke. (Zach Stovall/)

Come daylight, I take the wheel from Jost to Norman Island for a snorkeling excursion. The afternoon involves welcomed laziness, followed by a hike up the spine of the island, where we admire a red sun sinking behind the rolling hills of St. John’s. The next morning we end our week at The Indians: four pinnacles of rock, like icebergs, hiding more below the surface than above. Karen leads us on our most epic snorkel yet, along a healthy reef teeming with blue tangs, sergeant majors, parrotfish and coral.

Afterward, we end our carefree week of breathe-easy British Virgin Islands cruising and cocktail-infusion ­therapy at the base back in Tortola, and we thank ­Jewel Box for giving us an up-close look at this ­seafarer's paradise. Happily tired, sandy and ­sunburned, I think, Sometimes it's good to be the fifth wheel.

Getting There

Connecting to the MarineMax Vacations base on Tortola’s Beef Island is easiest via puddle jumper, like those from San Juan, Puerto Rico, aboard Cape Air or Seaborne Airlines. An alternative route through St. Thomas in the U.S. Virgin Islands, with a connecting ferry to Road Town on Tortola, is less expensive, but expect long lines at Customs and Immigration.

The Fine Print

MarineMax offers several power catamarans from its BVI base for bareboat, captained or crewed charter. One option is all-inclusive (with a captain, chef/deckhand, food, snacks, drinks, spirits, kayaks, a stand-up paddleboard, mooring-ball fees, taxes and insurance). Another is a la carte with a captain and chef. Or take the boat yourself, like we did. The vessels range from a two-stateroom 36-footer to a four-stateroom 48-footer. Bareboats charters like ours start at $1,287 and go up to $1,785 per night ($429 to $595 per stateroom).

Room to Breathe

The Aquila 44 is one of five power catamarans in the builder’s line, ranging from 32 to 48 feet length overall. Our version had three staterooms and three heads, making her a good option for couples who want to share the charter without anyone feeling like he’s stuck in a kiddie cabin. The master stateroom’s berth measures 71 inches wide by 79 inches long, or about the size of a queen; guest stateroom berths are 59 inches wide by 79 inches long. The salon’s seating converts into a single berth. A smart feature is the hinged window that opens the galley to the cockpit bar, to serve guests easily inside and outside.

If this Hull Could Talk

Her hold is laden with dark rum and darker secrets of those who have stayed long after sunset. The Willy T is the floating bar of Caribbean lore, but adrift for permanent anchorage because of a government dispute after her grounding in Hurricane Irma. Temporarily in Peter Island's Great Harbour, her stern bar still serves up stories to remember.


Take the next step: marinemax.com/vacations

New Flagship for Columbus Yachts

<em>Dragon</em>'s twin 3,000-horsepower MTU engines reportedly produce a maximum speed of 17 knots. The builder says that at 12 knots, the yacht has a 6,200 nautical-mile range.
Dragon's twin 3,000-horsepower MTU engines reportedly produce a maximum speed of 17 knots. The builder says that at 12 knots, the yacht has a 6,200 nautical-mile range. (Alberto Cocchi/)

Columbus Yachts, a division of Palumbo Superyachts in Italy, is planning for the world premiere of the new Columbus flagship, Dragon, at the Monaco Yacht Show in September.

The 262-foot Dragon was built in 27 months. Engineering is by Hydro Tec Studio, which also handled exterior design. Interiors are by Francesco Guida.

Twin 3,000-horsepower MTU engines reportedly produce a maximum speed of 17 knots. At 12 knots, range is more than 6,200 nautical miles, according to Columbus.

The yacht's beach club measures 2,150 square feet and has a bar, sauna and Turkish bath.
The yacht's beach club measures 2,150 square feet and has a bar, sauna and Turkish bath. (Alberto Cocchi/)

An elevator serves five of the six decks. The décor includes light woods, and bronze as well as what Columbus calls “satin gold” inserts. The fourth deck is reserved for the owner, with a nearly 1,200-square-foot stateroom, a sauna, a 14-seat dining table on deck aft, and forward access to the helipad.

Dragon carries two tenders: one that's 23 feet long, and another, built by Columbus, that's 31 feet length overall. They're housed on the lower deck along with a 2,150-square-foot beach club that has a bar, sauna, Turkish bath and guest seating in the glow of three backlit blue agate panels.

What else is on board Dragon? Windows that are 16 feet long by 6½ feet high, a bridge-deck wellness area with a massage parlor, a Videoworks home automation and entertainment system, and a 23-foot-long pool on the sun deck.

For more information, visit: palumbosuperyachts.com

Tested: Viking 58C

Powered with optional 1,600 hp MTU diesels, the Viking 58C that we got aboard hit 42.5 knots on the pins.
Powered with optional 1,600 hp MTU diesels, the Viking 58C that we got aboard hit 42.5 knots on the pins. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)

When it launched in 1991, the Viking Yachts 58 Convertible was the New Jersey builder's largest model to date. From 1991 to 2000, Viking built and sold 110 of the 58-footers, dubbed Gen I. That's a tough act to follow. But Viking is once again aiming for star status, having just raised the curtain on its second-generation 58 Convertible.

The new 58C has a 17-foot-9-inch beam, which is the same width as the builder's 55-footer, but with a different length-to-beam ratio for enhanced performance. The new hull form also repositions and changes the angle of strakes so water will break behind the house windshield, for a soft, dry and efficient ride.

For big-game battles, the 58C's cockpit has 165 square feet of teak-covered, fish-fighting space. There's also a transom livewell, a laminated in-deck backing plate for a fighting chair or a rocket launcher, an in-deck fish box and livewell, and a gaff/mop locker. The teak rocket launcher on Hull No. 1 of the 58C has 11 rod holders, two cup holders and a bait-prep area. Crew can watch trolled baits from the mezzanine seating. A Seakeeper SK9 gyrostabilizer is mounted under the cockpit sole.

Viking Yachts subsidiary Atlantic Marine Electronics can assist owners with outfitting a yacht’s helm.
Viking Yachts subsidiary Atlantic Marine Electronics can assist owners with outfitting a yacht’s helm. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)The 58C falls in the middle of Viking’s 10-model open-bridge line, ranging from 44 feet to 92 feet length overall.
The 58C falls in the middle of Viking’s 10-model open-bridge line, ranging from 44 feet to 92 feet length overall. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)

For post-battle rest and relaxation, the salon has an L-shaped settee to port with rod stowage underneath. Just forward is the galley, with two stools for breakfast before the lines hit the salt. The U-shaped galley has four Sub-Zero fridge/freezer (with ice ­maker) drawers, a four-burner Miele electric cooktop, a Sharp ­microwave/convection oven, a stainless-steel sink with a ­satin-nickel faucet, and ­cabinets above and below the countertops. A dinette is across from the galley, and a C-shaped settee for six flanks a high-gloss burl pedestal table.

Interior bulkheads and cabinetry are finished in high-gloss teak (walnut is optional), with a mappa-burl cocktail table, an Amtico sole at the salon entrance and galley, padded carpeting, and a Majilite headliner. There is also a Bose home-theater system with a retractable 50-inch ­flat-screen TV. While in the salon and ­g­alley, anglers can keep eyes on the lines through the aft window. ​

With a three-­stateroom, two-head layout, the Viking 58C has room for the ­tournament crew or the family. The master is amidships to port and has a walkaround queen berth set athwartships with stowage below. Two closets are here, and headroom is 6 feet, 7 inches. The shower stall has 6 feet, 10 inches of headroom.

The forepeak VIP has a centerline walkaround queen berth (split upper-lower crossovers are optional), a maple-lined locker, and an overhead hatch for fresh air and natural light. A starboard guest stateroom abaft the VIP has side-by-side berths, with one tucked under the companionway staircase. The two guest heads have Amtico soles, Dometic electric toilets, faux-stone countertops and separate shower stalls. Access to the bow thruster and tube is via a sole hatch in the VIP stateroom. Other hatches allow owner-operator access to a lower machinery space that’s fitted with plumbing, wire runs and pumps.

The Viking 58C has three staterooms; the master is amidships with an athwartships queen berth. Note the height of the closets. Headroom is 6 feet, 7 inches
The Viking 58C has three staterooms; the master is amidships with an athwartships queen berth. Note the height of the closets. Headroom is 6 feet, 7 inches (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)The balsa-cored hull and fiberglass fuel and holding tanks are all resin-infused. Bulkheads are also resin-infused with a composite core. The result is a relatively lightweight, strong hull.
The balsa-cored hull and fiberglass fuel and holding tanks are all resin-infused. Bulkheads are also resin-infused with a composite core. The result is a relatively lightweight, strong hull. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)Viking subsidiary Palm Beach Towers can build everything from hardtops to tuna towers to electronics boxes.
Viking subsidiary Palm Beach Towers can build everything from hardtops to tuna towers to electronics boxes. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)Several engine options from MAN and MTU are available. The engine room offers unobstructed access to regular maintenance items such as oil filters and fuel-water separators.
Several engine options from MAN and MTU are available. The engine room offers unobstructed access to regular maintenance items such as oil filters and fuel-water separators. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)The companionway leading belowdecks is purposefully set off centerline.
The companionway leading belowdecks is purposefully set off centerline. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)

To add to the interior living space, Viking pulled some space out of the engine room, which can be accessed via a door in the mezzanine seating. Headroom measures 5 feet, 10 inches, and there’s space to work around the twin 1,600 hp MTU diesels. The air conditioning units and 700-gallon-per-day watermaker filters are a cozier fit, and a 21.5-kW Onan generator is mounted abaft the engines, on a platform over the portside drive shaft. Viking finishes the 58C’s engine room like a laboratory, in bright white Awlgrip for spotting spills.

From fishability to fit and finish, Viking’s second-­generation 58 Convertible has the feet to fill the big shoes that the first-generation ­model left behind. Star status may, indeed, be on the horizon.

Speed Demon

Tricked out with optional twin 1,600 hp MTU 10V 2000 engines, the Viking 58 Convertible rocketed to a top-end speed of 42.5 knots during our time aboard in calm seas, with about a one-third fuel load (around 495 gallons), full water (207 gallons) and three people on board.

Twin 1,400 hp MAN diesels are standard, and options include 1,550 and 1,900 hp MAN diesels. Cruising at 36.5 knots with the diesels consuming 129 gallons per hour yields a 424-nautical-mile range. At her 42.5-knot wide-open velocity, fuel burn jumps to 176 gph for a range of 326 nautical miles.

The 58C holds 1,502 gallons of diesel, and there’s an option to increase the capacity to 1,741 gallons.

Command and Control

The Viking 58 Convertible is commanded from a center-console-style flybridge helm. There is full walkaround access to the helm pod (which is available in teak as an option), and visibility fore and aft is clean from the twin helm seats. Guests can sit on dual bench seats with backrests and on a forward-facing seat built into the helm pod. All seats have vinyl-covered foam cushions. For snacks and sodas, a refrigerated drink box is forward to starboard and a freezer box is to port.

Electronics are housed in recessed boxes that flank the helm with split console covers, and a center recessed console box houses multifunction displays and engine monitors. A drop-down box above can house additional electronics.

Take the next step: vikingyachts.com

Tested: The Hatteras GT59

The Hatteras GT59 is built for blue water with a solid-fiberglass hull bottom and an 89,000-pound displacement.
The Hatteras GT59 is built for blue water with a solid-fiberglass hull bottom and an 89,000-pound displacement. (Courtesy Hatteras Yachts/)

It's been more than a decade since Hatteras Yachts launched its GT line, lending new style to the North Carolina builder's long-respected ability to construct fishing battlewagons.

Today, the GT range includes open and flybridge models from 45 to 70 feet length overall, with the GT59 being the newest addition to the fleet.

Like her siblings, the GT59 is built to suit serious anglers, with 156 square feet of dance floor where owners can mount a leaning post/rocket launcher combination stand, or an offset fighting chair for chasing Hemingway-­worthy marlin. Adding to her fishy nature, there’s an in-transom livewell and a tackle center in the cockpit’s forward starboard corner, under the flybridge ladder and insulated in-deck fish boxes. Teak adds a rich look not only in the cockpit, but also in the coaming boards, and air conditioning vents in the back of the mezzanine seats make watching the trolling action feel, well, ultra cool.

Inside, the Hatteras GT59 has a single-level salon and galley. An L-shaped settee with a coffee table is to port and along the after bulkhead. To starboard is an entertainment unit with a built-in flat-screen TV. The layout allows room for an island galley with four fixed stools, a four-burner Miele electric cooktop, a Franke stainless-steel sink, an in-cabinet Sharp microwave, and four fridge/freezer drawers. High-gloss teak is used throughout the space, which also has a wood-grain vinyl sole and light-tone Silestone countertops—inviting and easy on maintenance.

Top speed: 40.1 knots
Top speed: 40.1 knots (Courtesy Hatteras Yachts/)The Hatteras GT59’s 156-square-foot cockpit provides room for anglers to move and fight their fish wherever it may run.
The Hatteras GT59’s 156-square-foot cockpit provides room for anglers to move and fight their fish wherever it may run. (Courtesy Hatteras Yachts/)

Belowdecks, Hatteras offers three layouts. The standard one has an en suite master stateroom to port (with 6-foot-5-inch headroom), a forward VIP with a queen berth and a head that also serves as the day head, and a starboard guest stateroom with upper-lower berths. In one optional layout, the forward VIP changes to 60-40 split berths. The third layout adds a day head abaft the starboard guest stateroom, swapping out the space from the standard utility room.

In all the layouts, there is a stand-up rod locker in the companionway. Door frames to the staterooms have rounded headers, adding to the high-end ambience that runs throughout the guest spaces.

Truly hardcore anglers may consider what’s dubbed the optional Hatteras Integrated Tackle Storage space. It converts the standard utility space into a tackle center with custom cabinets and lockers for rods, reels and supplies. In this space on the GT59 that I was aboard, I counted 27 rods (sans reels) in one locker alone. In-counter stowage holds larger reels such as Penn Internationals.

The engine room is designed for owner-operators, and it has one feature in particular that surprised me. When entering via a hatch in the mezzanine seating, I needed to step over the lower bulwark—and at first, I thought this setup was awkward. Soon, I realized that having the bulwark there likely eliminates seawater from entering the engine room, especially when backing down. I have seen decks get absolutely flooded with the amount of water that can wash over the transom, so this is a good idea.

The optional tuna tower creates the optimal vantage point for spotting inbound billfish. Black piping reduces sun glare.
The optional tuna tower creates the optimal vantage point for spotting inbound billfish. Black piping reduces sun glare. (Courtesy Hatteras Yachts/)The galley cabinetry is high-gloss teak, and the salon sole is wood-grain vinyl. Countertops are Silestone.
The galley cabinetry is high-gloss teak, and the salon sole is wood-grain vinyl. Countertops are Silestone. (Courtesy Hatteras Yachts/)

Headroom in the engine room is just over 5 feet, and I felt like I would have had plenty of room to move around and complete regular maintenance on the optional 1,900 hp Caterpillar C32A diesel engines (1,600 or 1,800 hp diesels are also available). A 1,200-gallon-per-day watermaker and a second 21.5-kW Onan generator can be added to the standard engine-room machinery. An optional Seakeeper 16 ­gyrostabilizer should keep the ride comfy.

But much of the GT59’s fun, of course, is to be had topsides. There are two helm setups: one on the flybridge and one in the tuna tower. The flybridge layout has a high-gloss teak pod with single-lever controls on centerline, twin helm seats and 360-degree ­visibility. The helm’s dash can house three Garmin multifunction displays, in varying sizes. Covered cabinets conceal the trim tabs controller, bow thruster joystick, Optimus rudder angle display and more. Overhead is a drop-down console with the Cat engine display monitor, autopilot, VHF radio and speed log.

Performance? Check. Fishability? Check. Luxury appointments? Check. In the GT59, Hatteras Yachts has built a sport-fisherman with solid speed, admirable range and myriad angling amenities. About the only thing left to do is to fill the fish boxes.

Time Well Spent

Hatteras Yachts says construction time for the GT59 is about eight months. The hull is built of solid fiberglass below the waterline, with a stringer system that is laid in during hull production. Divinycell sandwiched foam coring is used above the waterline. A sharp entry and variable-degree deadrise hull form allow for lift and fuel efficiency. Hull tunnels mean flatter shaft angles and allow for the yacht’s 4-foot-9-inch draft.

Peak Performance

A pair of optional 1,900 hp Caterpillar C32A diesels propelled my test GT59 to 40.1 knots at 2,300 rpm. The engines burned 204 gallons per hour at the yacht’s top hop. Dialed back to 1,800 rpm, she cruised at 29.8 knots while consuming 124 gph. At that speed, the GT59’s range is 379 nautical miles with a 10 percent fuel reserve. Dropping back to 21.8 knots and 1,500 rpm, range extended to 415 nautical miles with a fuel burn of 83 gph.

Take the next step: hatterasyachts.com

Cruising Maryland

The boating life is the beating heart of Oxford, Maryland.
The boating life is the beating heart of Oxford, Maryland. (Mark Sandlin/)

The first time I visited Oxford, Maryland, in 2004, I wrote that the place was like “a fly trapped in amber with a fistful of sawdust.” Walking through the town’s streets felt like strolling through some of the coolest pages in the history of boatbuilding. The population was only about 650 souls, and seasoned shipyard characters seemed to be around every corner. Some had hands callused from years of working in wood, or thick glasses from decades spent staring at lines plans. Big brands such as Hinckley had a presence, alongside places like the Cutts & Case Shipyard, which dates to 1965.

When I was there, Eddie Cutts Sr. was still in charge; we talked for a spell about how he'd spent two years restoring Foto, the 33-foot cedar chase boat that Morris and Stanley Rosenfeld used to photograph America's Cup yachts in the Golden Age of Yachting. Today, the yard is run by Ronnie Cutts and Eddie Cutts Jr., keeping the family legacy—and the ­boatbuilding legacy—alive as Oxford gentrifies into a more tourism-friendly place.

Rick Gordon welcomes customers with a smile at Dockside Boat Rentals, just up the street from Oxford’s ferry landing. Bicycles, ­paddleboards, kayaks and more are available for rent or purchase.
Rick Gordon welcomes customers with a smile at Dockside Boat Rentals, just up the street from Oxford’s ferry landing. Bicycles, ­paddleboards, kayaks and more are available for rent or purchase. (Mark Sandlin/)

“Instead of a true, honest-to-God working waterfront, now you have flowerbed competitions in the middle of town, festivals here, festivals there,” Cutts Jr. says. “It’s a fun little town with ice cream and good restaurants and all that kind of stuff. The boatbuilding and the ­marinas are all thriving and doing well.”

To visiting cruisers, he says, the place feels upgraded from 15 years ago.

“Everybody here is fierce about the place not changing too much,” he says. “I don’t think there will ever be a McDonald’s in the middle of Oxford. It’s a cool little town. I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.”

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