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Meet the Beneteau Antares 11

The 36-foot Antares 11 is the largest in the builder's four-model lines, which starts at 21 feet LOA.
The 36-foot Antares 11 is the largest in the builder's four-model lines, which starts at 21 feet LOA.

Beneteau has unveiled the Antares 11, a 36-footer that is the new flagship of the Antares powerboat line.

The Antares 11 was created in collaboration with Sarrazin Design in France. She has a flush deck between the cockpit and helm, and a sunpad for lounging on the foredeck with a Bimini top. In the main cabin space, two of the four glazed roof windows are opening hatches.

A full-beam stateroom aft has opening windows on each side. Overall, there are overnight sleeping spaces for seven people, including a convertible space in the salon.

What kind of power will the Antares 11 have? Twin outboard engines up to 300 horsepower apiece.

For more information, visit: beneteau.fr

New Conquest Models from Boston Whaler

Both the Boston Whaler 325 Conquest and 405 Conquest s enhanced glass sections for better visibility.
Both the Boston Whaler 325 Conquest and 405 Conquest s enhanced glass sections for better visibility. (Courtesy Boston Whaler/)

Boston Whaler used the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show as the stage for the debut of its 325 Conquest and 405 Conquest.

“The 405 Conquest and 325 Conquest mark the next evolution for the series, bringing versatility, comfort and capability to a whole new level,” Boston Whaler President Nick Stickler stated in a press release. “We’re thrilled to introduce the two models together and have already received a tremendous amount of positive feedback.”

The new Conquest models have full-beam windshields and restyled side glass for unobstructed visibility; a dive door with a removable ladder; and a portside companion lounge with a hidden, adjustable table. The 405 also has an adjustable chaise-style lounge at the bow with a personal stereo system.

The Boston Whaler 405 Conquest is the builder's largest in the line, which also includes a 285 Conquest, 315 Conquest, 325 Conquest and 345 Conquest.
The Boston Whaler 405 Conquest is the builder's largest in the line, which also includes a 285 Conquest, 315 Conquest, 325 Conquest and 345 Conquest. (Courtesy Boston Whaler/)

Belowdecks, the 405 has a private stateroom, while the 325 has a convertible V-berth. Both models have 300-hp Mercury Verado engines; there are quads on the 405 and twins on the 325.

Also new at the Lauderdale show: A Boston Whaler 380 Outrage with a quad Mercury Verado engine package.

Take the next step: go to bostonwhaler.com

A 130 Mangusta with Humphree Stabilizers

A 130-foot Mangusta is the first yacht of its size in North America to be fitted with the Humphree USA's quad fin stabilizers and quad interceptors.
A 130-foot Mangusta is the first yacht of its size in North America to be fitted with the Humphree USA's quad fin stabilizers and quad interceptors. (Courtesy Humphree/)

Humphree USA says a 130-foot Mangusta is the first yacht of its size in North America to be fitted with the company's quad fin stabilizers and quad interceptors.

The news comes at the same time Humphree has announced the introduction of fins for yachts in the 80- to 165-foot range.

According to Humphree, the fins on the Mangusta work alone between 0 and 10 knots. As the yacht goes faster, the interceptors kick in and work in conjunction with the fins.

The installation took place during a refit at Fort Lauderdale’s Roscioli Yachting Center of the 2009 build, which originally had different Humphree equipment installed. The yacht now has Humphree’s active ride control, autotrim, autolist and coordinated turn functions that correct for motion in three dimensions, including when turning at high speed.

“The owner was looking for a seamless stabilization system that would decrease rolling motions at anchor and also provide increased stabilization at full speed,” Sean Berrie, president of Humphree USA, stated in a press release. “We were able to offer an easily installed solution that works at speeds from zero to wide-open throttle while automatically adjusting to sea and wind conditions.”

Is the system noisy? According to Humphree, the power source for the fins is electric and has silent low-power operation, including running all night without the need for a genset.

For more information, visit: humphree.com

Wireless Yacht Controllers

Wireless controllers can enhance docking and close-quarters maneuvering.
Wireless controllers can enhance docking and close-quarters maneuvering. (Andrea Muscatello/)

An earnest crosswind piped across the waters off Florida’s Virginia Key, where the Miami International Boat Show was well underway. Victor Avila, Dockmate’s chief technical specialist, handed me a Dockmate wireless device and control of the Topaz 27 center-console—in clear view of several thousand spectators. As a lifelong sailor who’s shy about docking powerboats, I felt mild trepidation, but the system was so intuitive that I quickly got comfortable spinning circles and performing other maneuvers using the controller and, through it, the Topaz’s single screw and bow and stern thrusters.

Crosswinds, currents and skinny margins for error: At its brightest hour, docking is an art form. At its darkest, it’s a public shaming that so often comes with a memorable yard bill or marriage counseling (or, worse still, the hat trick). I had to agree that while wireless vessel controls aren’t mandatory safety equipment, they do make docking easier, safer and more intuitive.

At their core, today’s ­vessel-control systems, including Dockmate and Yacht Controller, consist of a wireless transmitter (the controller), a black-box receiver and a set of connecting cables. This hardware runs on sophisticated software that typically integrates directly with existing engine controls to deliver handheld wireless command of the yacht, so long as the transmitter is within range of the receiver. While each system differs, most wireless ones give operators command over the yacht’s engines or pod drives, bow and stern thrusters, anchor windlass, and horn. Additionally, some systems allow users to control peripheral devices such as passerelles or swimplatform elevators.

“The chief benefit is that boaters [can] leave the helm and have a closer look and still be in control with a transmitter that gives the same response and feel as [their] wired controls,” says Brian Sheehan, Dockmate’s spokesperson. “This is important in tight quarters.”

These systems can deliver fine motor control over a boat, allowing operators to slot a vessel into its berth smoothly, while freeing them to assist with docking duties.

“These aren’t cars: We’ve got wind and tide, and we’re always moving,” says Jerry Berton, president of The Yacht Group, which manufacturers the Yacht Controller. “Yacht Controller enables you to move the boat in any direction in as little as 1 inch at a time.”

Wireless controllers let the helmsman dock a vessel from any spot on board.
Wireless controllers let the helmsman dock a vessel from any spot on board. (Courtesy Dockmate/)

A device’s interface controls typically include buttons, joysticks and/or levers, with joysticks being the newest and most intuitive version. User commands are transmitted to the system’s black-box ­receiver via one or more radio ­frequencies. In turn, the system’s receiver shares the commands with the vessel’s engines and systems.

“We’ve designed cables that are very similar to the manufacturers’ [cables], but we added a Y-splitter cable,” Sheehan says. “One line goes to [the vessel’s] existing controls, and one line goes to our receiver, and [our system] takes it from there, using analog modules and CAN bus interfaces.”

A new system being able to connect to a vessel’s existing controls is key.

“Manufacturers have spent fortunes making electronic processors that control the engines and throttles, and we do not want to bypass these,” Berton says.

Safety is paramount any time mission-critical commands are transmitted over radio frequencies, especially in crowded marinas with competing RF signals. Dockmate operates on the 433 megahertz frequency over five different channels using a military-grade, frequency-­hopping spread spectrum system, and each Dockmate transmitter is coded to match its receiver (think automotive fobs). Conversely, Yacht Controller is a dual-band system alternating between the 433 MHz and 916 MHz frequencies, and derivations thereof, every one-sixteenth of a second.

In addition to integrating with vessel controls, Yacht Controller systems are compatible with Garmin multi-function displays and with Garmin’s OneHelm integration system.
In addition to integrating with vessel controls, Yacht Controller systems are compatible with Garmin multi-function displays and with Garmin’s OneHelm integration system. (Courtesy Yacht Controller/)

While their frequencies and features differ, wireless vessel-control systems work with most single- and twin-screw inboards, as well as pod-style drives and some outboards. Also, these systems generally use incremental throttle controls for inboards, but proportional controls are available for yachts with pod-style drives and/or proportional thrusters.

Engine type aside, wireless vessel control systems untether operators from the helm, allowing them to put eyeballs on the right bits of brine. While this ability adds utility and safety, these systems have narrowly defined onboard roles. ¶ “It’s only for docking,” says Sheehan, adding that the system is also useful for performing other low-speed, high-precision maneuvers such as anchoring, retrieving a man overboard, collecting crab traps or helping an angler land a pelagic prize. “We purposefully dialed back the rpm to a maximum of 30 percent of the engine’s capacity to keep boaters from using it for other means.”

Such authority settings can sometimes be custom-configured, however, Berton offers a cautionary note: “When you start going 5 knots [in a marina], your chances of accidents are high. The majority of the time, you’re going less than 5 knots.”

As with any crucial system, these require yacht owners to set up a sea trial to familiarize themselves and to identify vessel-specific customizations. For example, Sheehan says, Dockmate ­installers can dial down the bow thruster rpm to match the vessel’s stern thruster or modify the throttle governor.

Overall, yacht owners can expect far less ­stressful docking and easier close-quarters maneuvering—and, potentially, the ­ability to do short- or singlehanded cruising.

“People can run their boat, and they can tie it up by themselves,” Berton says. “This allows them to enjoy boating without grief, and it can be a marriage saver.”

Eco-Friendly Med Charter

The E&E crew picks up any trash that they find on Mediterranean beaches. They sometimes leave signs behind, encouraging people not to litter.
The E&E crew picks up any trash that they find on Mediterranean beaches. They sometimes leave signs behind, encouraging people not to litter. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons International/Halil Cetin/)

The owner of the 138-foot Cizgi E&E is a longtime ­sailor who thought he was doing his part for the eco-friendly movement. He even went so far as to spend three years planning and building E&E in ways that would keep fuel use low—and this was more than a decade ago, before being eco-friendly became wholly fashionable.

“Because of our sensitivity regarding the environment, we started thinking about these things with the ­design of the boat,” says owner’s representative Sansal Ilgun. “We did the testing in Holland and tried to achieve the best propeller design, the best engine ­power and the ­best-performing hull. The ­result of that is that our engines consume only 130 liters [34 gallons] at 11 knots. We don’t do more than this—because that’s the best. Our top speed is 14 or 15 knots, but it’s senseless. You consume much more.”

And yet, even with that kind of mindfulness taking place, the owner realized the scope of the planet’s problems required much more action. Specifically, he wanted to do more about the trash and plastic making their way into the waters he felt passionate about protecting, both where he cruised in the Mediterranean and beyond.

“He decided to do something on land to minimize waste,” Ilgun says. “All the waste in the sea and the oceans is coming from the land.”

<em>E&E</em> can hit 14 or 15 knots, but the captain keeps the throttles back at 11 knots, where the yacht achieves the best fuel efficiency.
E&E can hit 14 or 15 knots, but the captain keeps the throttles back at 11 knots, where the yacht achieves the best fuel efficiency. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons International/Halil Cetin/)

In 2015, the owner founded the Mind Your Waste Foundation. Based in Turkey, the group does educational and lobbying campaigns that promote recycling and work to eliminate plastic use and littering.

And what better place to show what might be possible than aboard his own yacht?

This past spring, the Yacht Club de Monaco ­awarded E&E its La Belle Class Explorer Award for the program's ­commitment to environmentally mindful cruising and charter operations. The owner still has the yacht running at fuel-efficient speeds and has since worked to ban the use of plastic on board, allowed only biodegradable cleaning products to be used, and applauded his crewmembers not only for picking up litter, but also for posting signs on beaches that encourage people to dispose of trash properly.

“We don’t buy any ­plastic water bottles or drinks,” ­Ilgun says. “We have our own ­water-purifying system. Our guests coming on board, we give them a reusable water bottle with the Mind Your Waste logo on it, and we encourage them to use that bottle all the time, including when they go on shore. If they insist on a certain type of water, like Evian or something, we put it into these bottles so we don’t use any kind of plastic bottles or straws.”

So far, he adds, charter clients have been happy to go along with the program.

Note the large windows on the upper deck: Those are guest staterooms. The crew space is belowdecks, where other yachts typically house guests.
Note the large windows on the upper deck: Those are guest staterooms. The crew space is belowdecks, where other yachts typically house guests. (Courtesy Camper & Nicholsons International/Halil Cetin/)

“Everybody is starting to believe that this world has limited resources,” he says. “There will be the end of clean water and clean air and a clean environment. Everybody respects that and believes that, in the future, we will all be on the same page. We had to start from somewhere, so we started.”

The wide-angle views of the water from on board E&E help to drive home what's at stake. The yacht has an unusual layout, with the master stateroom in the traditional location forward on the main deck but with the other four guest ­staterooms one level up, with larger ­windows than are possible belowdecks. That level on E&E is for crew, including any extra staff a charter client wants to add.

And if they want to pick up trash too, they are welcome to join in. “These things are like the sea star story,” Ilgun says, referring to what Americans call “The Starfish Story,” about every bit contributing toward change. “You have to start somewhere, and one day, it will make a difference. We have made the world very dirty. We have to clean it.”

Viking Yachts 46 Billfish

The Viking 46 Billfish is the new flagship in this series for the New Jersey builder.
The Viking 46 Billfish is the new flagship in this series for the New Jersey builder. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)

Viking yachts' 46 ­Billfish is a vessel that takes owners from the mid-30-foot dayboat category into the traveling, tournament-circuit-ready stage.

The big sister to the 38 ­Billfish, the 46's extra waterline should increase comfort offshore on those choppy days and enhance internal volume, easily accommodating a larger crew or a family when cruising.

To that end, the layout belowdecks has a forepeak master stateroom with a queen island berth and a hanging locker. Aft to port is the second stateroom with two bunks for crew or the kids. There is a single head with a walk-in shower abaft the second stateroom at the foot of the stairs leading from the main deck.

Interior wood is high-gloss teak, and the salon sole is Amtico—a vinyl ­product produced with resin under high pressure, creating a durable, ­low-maintenance surface.

Abaft the master stateroom to starboard is the galley with an L-shaped Corian countertop. The galley is fitted out with a two-burner electric cooktop, ­microwave, catty-cornered sink, and fridge and freezer drawers with an ice maker.

The Palm Beach-style helm has a Release Marine teak chair and an optional companion chair. The 46 Billfish’s black mask helps to visually lower the yacht’s profile. The insulated cockpit fish boxes drain overboard.
The Palm Beach-style helm has a Release Marine teak chair and an optional companion chair. The 46 Billfish’s black mask helps to visually lower the yacht’s profile. The insulated cockpit fish boxes drain overboard. (Courtesy Viking Yachts/)

The homelike ­appointments should keep the owner and crew happy during downtime, but the primary ­mission for most ­Viking owners is chasing big fish. And it starts with the yacht’s business end, a 140-square-foot cockpit with room to mount a fighting chair or a rocket ­launcher into the laminated deck plate. Other angling amenities ­include in-sole fish boxes to port and starboard, a bait freezer, and a transom livewell, which can serve as ­another fish box. Mezzanine seating flanks the centerline steps to the main deck, and this seating should give the crew an unimpeded view of the trolling lanes.

If it gets hot in the cockpit—or the bite slacks off, and it’s time for lunch—the ­main-deck salon has U-shaped seating with a table to port and a bench seat across.

Standard power for the 46 Billfish is twin 715 hp Cummins QSM11 diesels. Twin 800 hp MAN i6-800 diesels are an option. Projected performance data was not ­available at press time. A Seakeeper SK6 gyrostabilizer is available.

Look for the 46 Billfish on display at the fall boat shows.

Take the next step: vikingyachts.com

Bertram Repower

The owner of a vintage Bertram converts his power package to Volvo Penta IPS.
The owner of a vintage Bertram converts his power package to Volvo Penta IPS. (Courtesy Volvo Penta/)

Admittedly, the owner of the 35-foot Bertram Moppie Fiddler says it took him a beat to get used to his boat's new power package and controls after repowering the 1970 build using Volvo Penta IPS600 with D6 435 diesels.

“I’m 54, so I’m a little old-school,” he stated in a press release. “When I put my hand on the joystick, it took a minute—but I got it. Not as quick as my 20-year-old, who picked it up in a second, but I picked it up pretty quick.”

With the repower, handled by Florida Detroit Diesel-Allison, Fiddler moved from a 24-knot top speed to 34 knots, turning her into the more muscular dayboat the owner envisioned.

“Now it’s a picnic boat on steroids,” he says. “It’s bigger, beefier and better looking.”

The 60-knot Tender

The Onda 331 GT can be customized to have interior and exterior aesthetics match her mothership’s.
The Onda 331 GT can be customized to have interior and exterior aesthetics match her mothership’s. (Courtesy Onda Tenders/)

Greece-based Onda Tenders ­partnered with Mannerfelt Design Team in Sweden to produce the 331 Gran Turismo. The ­32-foot-5-inch speedster has a deep-V, ­twin-step hull paired with twin 250 hp ­outboards. ­According to the builder, this combination allows it to sprint across the water at upward of 60 knots with the hammer down.

Whom It's For: This is a ­tender for an owner with a healthy penchant for a little bit of wind and spray, as well as for the needle-sharp performance of a boat imbued with Mannerfelt's racing heritage.   ­

Picture This: You're in the sky lounge of your 180-footer off ­Mykonos when you get a hankering for the best braised octopus this side of Athens. It's served at a shaded little beach bistro about a mile away. Thanks to the 331 GT, you'll be seated there momentarily.

Take the next step: ondatenders.com

Unlimited VSAT Streaming for Yachts

KVH Elite, available in Florida and the Caribbean starting in November 2019, lets users use apps to stream HD movie and TV content, music and more, with no overages or data limits.
KVH Elite, available in Florida and the Caribbean starting in November 2019, lets users use apps to stream HD movie and TV content, music and more, with no overages or data limits. (Courtesy KVH/)

KVH Industries has announced KVH Elite, a premium, unlimited VSAT-streaming service for yachts in certain regions.

As of November 2019, KVH Elite is expected to be available in Florida and the Caribbean. Service is expected to follow in the Mediterranean during 2020.

This service, which is part of KVH’s global mini-VSAT BroadbandSM HTS network, lets users use apps to stream HD movie and TV content, music and more, with no overages or data limits.

The streaming service uses KVH’s VSAT antenna systems. Yachts already using the 60-cm-diameter TracPhone V7-HTS or the 1-meter-diameter TracPhone V11-HTS can activate KVH Elite with no new equipment.

“The yachting market, particularly at the highest level, is seeing an incredible demand for VSAT connectivity,” Mark Woodhead, KVH executive vice president for mobile connectivity, stated in a press release. “When you are on a yacht, you expect to be able to stream movies and other entertainment content just like you do at home. Our new KVH Elite unlimited streaming service is one more example of how KVH’s premium VSAT connectivity can enhance the yachting experience.”

What kind of packages can KVH Elite clients get? Weekly and monthly airtime plans are available.

For more information, visit: kvh.com/unlimitedstreaming

Exotic Yacht Charter

Raja Ampat, Indonesia, is virtually untouched and offers some of the best scuba diving and snorkeling in the world.
Raja Ampat, Indonesia, is virtually untouched and offers some of the best scuba diving and snorkeling in the world. (Courtesy Aqua Expeditions/)

Francesco Galli Zugaro learned about the ­profound effect that a protected, ecologically diverse destination can have on people when he spent six years running a company called Ocean Adventures in the Galapagos Islands. The wildlife, the scenery, the lack of development—all of it made him want to see more of the most untouched parts of the world.

About a decade ago, he launched Aqua Expeditions, a company dedicated to showing people those kinds of destinations aboard luxury ­riverboats. He began with Aqua Amazon in South America and then added Aqua Mekong in China, creating a following of by-the-stateroom customers, along with by-the-boat clients, who had a similar penchant for exploring remote locales in comfort.

Now, Zugaro is adding a superyacht to his charter fleet. In fall 2018, he bought Aqua Blu, a 198-foot Brooke ­Marine previously known in the ­Mediterranean market as Titan. She is finishing a refit and scheduled to reposition around the time you read this, so she can become the first Western-style superyacht to base  year-round for charter in the remote parts of Indonesia.

The only flat land is at the beach on the volcanic islands of Komodo National Park. Elevations rise to more than 2,400 feet above sea level. Komodo National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s home to the Komodo dragon, a lizard that can grow to 200 pounds and 8 feet long. Charter guests can head ashore to see them and hike up for views all around.
The only flat land is at the beach on the volcanic islands of Komodo National Park. Elevations rise to more than 2,400 feet above sea level. Komodo National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site that’s home to the Komodo dragon, a lizard that can grow to 200 pounds and 8 feet long. Charter guests can head ashore to see them and hike up for views all around. (Courtesy Aqua Expeditions/)

“If I’m not working, I’m scouting the world for new destinations,” he says. “My clients have done Galapagos. They’ve done Antarctica. They want to go somewhere new.” ​

His plan is to offer four itineraries aboard Aqua Blu, with about 12 weeks a year kept open for full-yacht bookings of all 15 staterooms at once. Starting this October and November, the yacht will position for two months each year in the Spice Islands. From December through February, she will charter in Raja Ampat before moving to Bali and the area of Komodo National Park from April through ​September. After that, Aqua Blu will start the route over again in the Spice Islands—for as many years, Zugaro says, as clients want to visit.

Itineraries in those three ​destinations will be seven nights apiece, with a fourth, 12-night, shoulder-season option that includes highlights of each.

The spot among them that has most captured Zugaro’s imagination is Ambon, an island in the Spice Islands archipelago that few, if any, crewed charter yachts visit.

Aqua Expeditions is offering four Indonesia itineraries that focus on above-water and underwater nature encounters, along with historical sites.
Aqua Expeditions is offering four Indonesia itineraries that focus on above-water and underwater nature encounters, along with historical sites. (Courtesy Aqua Expeditions/)

“I went there, and I was blown away,” he says. “There were Dutch cannons on the side of the road from the 1700s. It says Dutch East India Company on the walls. And this is also some of the best hammerhead diving in the world.”

That combination of regional history, natural beauty and wildlife—combined with the comforts of a superyacht—is the mix that he’s after, and for which he wants Aqua Expeditions to be known. He also wants to make it predictable, in terms of cost, to charter in such remote places. That’s why Aqua Blu’s weekly rate of $258,000 for 30 guests is inclusive of the yacht’s fuel, as well as food, wine, beer and scuba diving—all things that can be billed as extras aboard charter yachts in the Mediterranean and Caribbean.

And while spa services and crew gratuity are extras, he is able to offer the nearly all-inclusive deal, he says, because he had to price out the costs for things that most guests want anyway, for the weeks that Aqua Blu will take by-the-stateroom bookings.

“But we can get whatever people want,” he says. “If they want U.S.-bottled Coke, they can have it. We’ve done that request. We are in business for the clients, not ‘I’ll charter it when I’m not ​​using it.’”

Aqua Nera: an Aqua Expeditions riverboat due in 2020.
Aqua Nera: an Aqua Expeditions riverboat due in 2020. (Courtesy Aqua Expeditions/)

Zugaro is also trying to ensure that Aqua Blu becomes known as a yacht that is showing off the region while helping to protect it, as well as its indigenous people. He is hiring local rangers to come aboard and take guests into the parks, so the rangers won’t feel like they’re promoting a foreign yacht in their communities. The yacht’s full-time paramedic will go ashore and help local children with medical needs. And Zugaro has organized donation kits that charter guests can purchase, if they choose, to give to the locals. The kits are packed with things such as soap, books, salt and fishing weights.

“That way, we are removing all the plastic and packaging, and we’re giving them things they actually need—books they can actually read,” Zugaro says.

And, given the experience he has had with other Aqua Expeditions vessels, he is limiting the number of charter guests to five per naturalist guide. He plans to hire local guides for those jobs, to help educate clients not only about the flora and fauna they are seeing, but also about the culture of their homeland. Local support will also be brought in for scuba trips, should more than eight guests at a time want to go diving, and researchers studying things like black coral will be welcomed aboard to work while mingling with the crew and guests, offering yet another layer of expertise.

Because there is so little development in Raja Ampat, Indonesia, there is no light pollution to drown out the sparkling stars in the night sky.
Because there is so little development in Raja Ampat, Indonesia, there is no light pollution to drown out the sparkling stars in the night sky. (Courtesy Aqua Expeditions/)

All of that learning should spark some interesting conversations when guests are relaxing in the refurbished interior by Dutch designer Cor D. Rover. Breakfast and lunch will be served in the fo’c’sle, while dinner will be on the main deck at a table that seats 22. Among the items meant to spur conversation are hand-painted, gold-leaf plates that Zugaro had made for the yacht, based on original nature sketches by British explorer Alfred Russel Wallace.

Wallace was a contemporary of Charles Darwin, and both men worked on their own theories of evolution. Darwin did his research in the Galapagos Islands, while Wallace included travels in ­Indonesia.

Which is a fitting tie-in, Zugaro says, to his own path that led him from the Galapagos to here with Aqua Blu.

“This is the Galapagos of Southeast Asia,” he says. “Diving, snorkeling—everything.”

Brokerage: Grand Banks Aleutian 59 RP

The main-deck layout is a split-level salon and helm in an open floor plan. There are three staterooms and three heads.
The main-deck layout is a split-level salon and helm in an open floor plan. There are three staterooms and three heads. (Courtesy Grand Banks/)

The grand banks 59 aleutian rp was the result of a design ­collaboration between the builder and naval-architecture firm Sparkman & Stephens. The 59’s mission was to maintain a traditional Grand Banks trawler aesthetic but offer higher performance.

Hull design is a modified-V shape with prop pockets and a skeg keel. Top speed: about 25 knots.

Construction for the hull is solid fiberglass, while the superstructure has Airex foam coring.

At press time, we found nine Grand Banks 59 Aleutian RPs on the market, ranging from $1.2 million to $1.9 million.

From the Archive

“The 59 is actually a ­25-plus-knot yacht, with two hearty 1,000 hp Caterpillar C18s tucked under the hood. Standard power is a pair of C9s (900 hp). If you want to motor along at 8 knots, you’ll have long legs and good fuel economy. But if something large and red appears on your weather scope, you have the speed to outrun it. Underway, the 59 is ­well-­behaved and predictable.” —Yachting, October 2007

Concept Yachts

The Dynamiq Global 330 would be built in aluminum. The hull form is by Van Oossanen Naval Architects in the Netherlands.
The Dynamiq Global 330 would be built in aluminum. The hull form is by Van Oossanen Naval Architects in the Netherlands. (Courtesy Dynamiq/)

The trend in yacht design is vessels that can explore farther with more creature ­comforts than ever before. While owners used to be content to bob off the south of France in summer and play in the Caribbean come winter, nowadays, the goal is to get where other yachts can’t go—in the highest style possible.

Three ­recently released concept designs epitomize this trend. First is the Dynamiq Global 330, model No. 1 in what’s planned as a ­three-yacht line from 98 to 131 feet. Billed as explorer yachts, the vessels would have shallow drafts to get into harbors that other yachts can’t access. On the 330, the draft would be less than 6 feet.

A 141-foot explorer by designer Tommaso Spadolini.
A 141-foot explorer by designer Tommaso Spadolini. (Courtesy Tommaso Spadolini/)

Also tapping into the go-anywhere zeitgeist is Italian designer Tommaso Spadolini, who drew a ­141-foot exterior for a client who wants two ­transom garages for long-range ­cruising and exploration. The bays would hold twin 18-foot tenders, and ­Spadolini’s office is looking into whether the hull could be built to Ice Class standards.

Rosetti Superyachts has unveiled its concept for a 170-foot supply vessel yacht, ­combining the functionality of a shadow boat with the features and finish of a luxury ­design. The more than 1,500-square-foot aft deck can have a helipad or a swimming pool, and an 860-square-foot space aft can be a tender garage or a beach club.

The Rosetti Superyachts supply vessel yacht concept combines the features of a shadow boat with those of a luxury yacht. Above this beach club is a helipad.
The Rosetti Superyachts supply vessel yacht concept combines the features of a shadow boat with those of a luxury yacht. Above this beach club is a helipad. (Courtesy Rosetti Superyachts/)

All of the concepts have one thing in common: They attempt to satisfy ­growing consumer demand for go-anywhere ­vessels that look and feel more like ­luxury superyachts. As Dynamiq’s CEO put it in a press release: “Following up on client requests, we have been looking at the explorer market for quite a while, and this year, we decided to come into the game with something completely different for our more adventurous owners. Instead of slow, steel-hulled explorers with the typical commercial styling, we drew on our forward-thinking approach to create a fast and modern series of vessels.”

Meet the Sea Ray Sundancer 320 Coupe Outboard

The Sea Ray Sundancer 320 Coupe Outboard is powered with twin 350 hp Mercury Verado outboards.
The Sea Ray Sundancer 320 Coupe Outboard is powered with twin 350 hp Mercury Verado outboards. (Courtesy Sea Ray/)

Sea Ray is putting final touches on its Sundancer 320 Coupe Outboard, which is scheduled to make her premiere at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show.

The Sundancer 320 Coupe Outboard is an evolution of the Sundancer 320. It has a hardtop, a full windshield and side vent windows; a retracting canvas sunroof is an option.

“The Sundancer 320 Coupe Outboard illustrates the most recent enhancements and evolution of the Sundancer line,” Steve Langlais, Sea Ray’s president, stated in a press release. “We first introduced the Sundancer 320 in 2017. Today, our vision for the model continues to expand to blend the values of a cruiser and a bowrider, and now a coupe.”

Twin Mercury 350 Verado outboards are the standard power package. They come with Mercury’s Joystick Piloting at the helm. Also standard is a wet bar in the cockpit with an optional refrigerator and grill; a cabin with overnight accommodations for four people; and a head.

What electronics are at the helm? Dual displays with Mercury VesselView data, Simrad GO9 9-inch touchscreen displays, and Sea Ray Connect smart boat monitoring powered by Nautic-On.

For more information, visit: searay.com

VesselVanguard Partners with Hylas Yachts

Every owner of a new Hylas yacht gets a three-year subscription to VesselVanguard. The VesselVanguard system gives owner notifications and status updates on required maintenance
Every owner of a new Hylas yacht gets a three-year subscription to VesselVanguard. The VesselVanguard system gives owner notifications and status updates on required maintenance (Courtesy Hylas Yachts/)

VesselVanguard and Hylas Yachts have inked a deal to give every owner of a new Hylas yacht a three-year subscription to VesselVanguard.

The VesselVanguard system gives owner notifications and status updates for required maintenance, and establishes a protocol for Hylas’ technical department to remotely monitor maintenance tasks and offer technical assistance. The maintenance history is logged for future reference when the boat goes on the brokerage market.

“Our boats are known for their quality and seaworthiness, but like all boats of this nature, the systems are complex, requiring an equal attention to detail in their maintenance,” Andy Huang, principal at Hylas Yachts, stated in a press release. “In our opinion, VesselVanguard stands alone as the only user-friendly solution that provides necessary detail and unparalleled simplicity.”

What kinds of boats does Hylas build? Based in Taiwan, the company has built upscale sailboats and yachts for more than 45 years in lengths overall from 40 to 70 feet, working with designers such as Sparkman & Stephens, German Frers and Bill Dixon.

For more information about VesselVanguard: go to vesselvanguard.com

"Lady Cope" is Returning to the Bahamas

<em>Lady Cope</em> is well-equipped for charter guests with a penchant for water sports.
Lady Cope is well-equipped for charter guests with a penchant for water sports. (Courtesy Ocean Independence/)

Ocean Independence says the 98-foot Princess motoryacht Lady Cope is on her way south from the New England region, with inquiries now being accepted for the Bahamas this winter.

Built in 2012 and refitted in 2016, Lady Cope accommodates eight guests in four staterooms. She has a contemporary interior décor, and a flybridge with an opening sunroof, hot tub and television.

A custom water slide attaches to the top deck for water-sports fun. In the lazarette are fishing gear, standup paddleboards, WaveRunners and more. Also part of the package: a 30-foot Everglades tender.

What's the lowest weekly base rate to charter Lady Cope? It's $47,000.

How to book a week on board: contact a charter broker at oceanindependence.com

Speedy Sunseeker

Part of the Hawk 38’s performance pedigree is a triple-step hull form.
Part of the Hawk 38’s performance pedigree is a triple-step hull form. (Courtesy Sunseeker/)

These days, the Sunseeker brand is most associated with luxury motoryachts, but serious performance has always been a key DNA strand for the British company. There have been all manner and sizes of 50-knot Sunseeker Predators over the years, as well as various Superhawks and the Renegade 60—and, even further back, Hawks, Mohawks and Thunderhawks. The 39-foot XS 2000 from more than a decade ago is the closest relative to the British builder's new Hawk 38, the first outboard-propelled Sunseeker runabout since the Sportsfisher 37 of the early 2000s.

Owing to a frisky, short chop while I was on board, the Hawk 38 seemed to spend less time afloat than airborne. This boat has an anti-stuff bow, stab tubes and a triple-step hull, along with an optional G-meter for measuring acceleration—all features you’re more likely to find on a race boat than a dayboat. The twin Mercury Verado 400Rs howled as I shunted the metallic-red race throttles back and forth. In flat seas, she should max out at just over 62 knots. In the low 50s and chop, I was getting more than enough excitement for the prevailing conditions, but in the open ocean, I could imagine Evel Knievel using her to jump ferries.

Fabio Buzzi and his Italy-based FB Design deliver high-speed solutions, mostly to navies and coast guards. The company has also designed and built race boats and record-breakers.
Fabio Buzzi and his Italy-based FB Design deliver high-speed solutions, mostly to navies and coast guards. The company has also designed and built race boats and record-breakers. (Courtesy Fabio Buzzi/)

Sunseeker’s design team used computational fluid dynamics to minimize air drag. Reportedly, this boat is the result of around 8,000 in-house design hours. And those hours exclude the development time from Fabio Buzzi’s FB Design team on Lake Como, Italy. That team was responsible for the running platform and lamination of the hulls and decks.

For strength at speed, those hulls and decks are post-cured vinylester, mated together with a technique that involves bonding compounds, longitudinal aluminum extrusions and ­polyurethane closed-cell foam. The result is an ­essentially rattle-free structure ready for the sea. She handled well, and I found it rewarding to trim her manually, although she will autotrim too.

The Sunseeker Hawk 38 has a foredeck sun pad for catching rays. When shade is desired—or required—a sail canopy is optional. Just abaft the sun pad is U-shaped seating and a table.
The Sunseeker Hawk 38 has a foredeck sun pad for catching rays. When shade is desired—or required—a sail canopy is optional. Just abaft the sun pad is U-shaped seating and a table. (Courtesy Sunseeker/)

Her finish is on par with what Sunseeker fans expect, with fit-out at Supermarine Powerboats in the United Kingdom. What you see is what you get in terms of the layout: two-by-two bolster-bucket seats abaft a ­Simrad-dominated dash, with a wingtip carbon-fiber ­hardtop above, a rear bench, ­walk-around Flexiteek decks, and booth seating and a sun pad forward. A head is amidships, and a waterproof locker is in the bow for two Seabobs and chargers (or ­other gear of similar size). Notable options include metallic paint, electronics upgrades and a towing kit.

Look for Hull No. 3 of the Hawk 38 at the Fort ­Lauderdale International Boat Show this fall.

Take the next step: sunseeker.com

Yes, You Can Buy "Happiness"

The 100-foot <em>Happiness</em> was built in 2007 and refit in 2018. Asking price is $3.495 million.
The 100-foot Happiness was built in 2007 and refit in 2018. Asking price is $3.495 million. (Courtesy 26 North Yachts/)

The team at 26 North Yachts sends word that the owner of the 100-foot Cheoy Lee Happiness just dropped his asking price by $495,000. The new asking price is $3.495 million.

Happiness is a 2007 build that was refitted in 2018. According to the brokerage firm: "After acquiring Happiness last year, her owner addressed every single item that came up on her pre-purchase survey; then he opted to refresh and update virtually every facet of the yacht. The vast majority of this work was completed between July and October 2018, though notable work has taken place through May 2019."

The engine room houses twin 1,650-horsepower Caterpillar C32s showing 4,459 hours apiece. Top speed, according to the brokerage firm, is 22 knots, with a cruising speed of 18 knots. Range is listed as nearly 1,800 nautical miles.

For fishing fans, the cockpit has a live well and rod holders. Inside, the master stateroom is on the main deck with three additional guest staterooms belowdecks. The sky lounge has a raised observation area for views out over the bow.

What work was done in the most recent refit periods? The list is several pages long. It includes everything from new VHF radio antennas to new carpeting and the installation of LED lighting.

Take the next step: contact a sales broker at 26northyachts.com

Royal Huisman Turns "Phi's" Hull

Royal Huisman recently flipped the hull on its 180-foot superyacht <em>Phi</em>.
Royal Huisman recently flipped the hull on its 180-foot superyacht Phi. (Guy Booth/)

Royal Huisman in the Netherlands has rolled the hull of the motoryacht Phi out of the construction shed, used four cranes to turn her upright, and brought her back inside to continue with construction and outfitting.

Phi, which will be more than 180 feet long, has exteriors by Cor D. Rover, interiors by Lawson Robb and naval architecture by Van Oossanen. The Van Oossanen Fast Displacement XL hull form will allow the yacht to come in at less than 500 gross tons, according to Royal Huisman.

The plan is for Phi to be delivered in 2021, so she can begin cruising alongside a 118-foot shadow vessel. That boat also is a collaboration between Rover and Van Oossanen, and is being built now in Asia.

The Van Oossanen Fast Displacement XL hull form allows the yacht to come in at less than 500 gross tons.
The Van Oossanen Fast Displacement XL hull form allows the yacht to come in at less than 500 gross tons. (Guy Booth/)

What does Phi mean? It's a mathematics term for when two quantities are in "the golden ratio," also sometimes known as the "golden mean."

Follow the construction of Phi: visit royalhuisman.com

Technohull Launches Two Grand Sport 38s

The 38's projected top speed is 103 knots.
The 38's projected top speed is 103 knots. (Courtesy Technohull/)

Technohull in Greece has launched the first two hulls of its Grand Sport 38. Based on model testing last year, they're expected to hit speeds around 103 knots.

The boats have what the builder calls a Dynastream hull, which has three steps and a deep-V form. Technohull’s designers developed the hull during a five-year research period with the Davidson Laboratory at the Stevens Institute of Technology in New Jersey.

Finish on the first two hulls is meant to complement superyachts, with the Grand Sport 38s being used as tenders. The standard twin-engine Mercury Verado 300XL version has solid teak decking and orange Spradling upholstery that's diamond-stitched. The sport version of the boat, with triple Mercury Verado 450s, has crimson upholstery inlaid with black and gray stripes intended to be reminiscent of carbon fiber.

The Technohull 38 is shallow-water friendly.
The Technohull 38 is shallow-water friendly. (Courtesy Technohull/)

Both versions have LED courtesy lighting, a swim ladder with push-button control, and the option of hardtops.

What's the range on a boat that goes so fast? According to Technohull, it's 200 nautical miles with the standard propulsion.

Take the next step: visit technohull.com

Philippe Briand Unveils Perfect 60 Concept

The Perfect 60 is a ketch with a carbon fiber mast and rig, and an inverted bow.
The Perfect 60 is a ketch with a carbon fiber mast and rig, and an inverted bow. (Courtesy Phillipe Briand/)

Longtime yacht designer Philippe Briand has unveiled the Perfect 60, a concept yacht that is a smaller sibling to the 300-foot SY 100 that he released this past spring.

The Perfect 60 is a ketch with a carbon fiber mast and rig, and an inverted bow. It is intended to combine motoryacht features with sailing yacht performance that’s strong enough to take line honors at regattas.

Briand says the design also is intended to reduce environmental impact. Underwater turbines are built into the concept, to harness power that would charge the onboard batteries.

How many Philippe Briand designs have been built? About 12,000, according to the firm. His company's current projects range from 19 to 344 feet length overall.

Take the next step: visit philippebriand.com

Intrepid Plans Three Debuts for Fort Lauderdale

The 477 Evolution is the lead's the builders Sport Yacht series, which also includes the 410 Evolution, 430 Sport Yacht and 475 Sport Yacht.
The 477 Evolution is the lead's the builders Sport Yacht series, which also includes the 410 Evolution, 430 Sport Yacht and 475 Sport Yacht. (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

Intrepid Powerboats is planning the premiere for three models at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show: the 477 Evolution, 407 Nomad and 345 Walkaround.

The 477 Evolution will be the new flagship in Intrepid’s Sport series. It will have a feature that hasn’t appeared on any other Intrepids: hull-side openings on both the port and starboard sides. A dive door is to starboard, with a hydraulic fold-down platform to port with a recessed swim ladder.

The 407 Nomad is the third boat, and the largest, in the Florida builder's walkaround series.
The 407 Nomad is the third boat, and the largest, in the Florida builder's walkaround series. (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

The 407 Nomad has a 700-gallon fuel tank, and is available with two console configurations. The SE has side entry to the head, while the FE has front entry to the head.

The 345 Walkaround is intended to pack some bigger-boat features into a smaller hull. It has a galley, a head with a shower, and a forward area whose U-shape seating and table convert to a berth.

The 345 has a 34'5
The 345 has a 34'5" LOA, a 10'6" beam and a 320-gallon fuel capacity. (Courtesy Intrepid Powerboats/)

Each boat can be customized: Intrepid offers numerous options that owners can choose for the new models.

Take the next step: go to intrepidpowerboats.com

Reviewed: Monte Carlo Yachts 66

The Portuguese bridge is one of many DNA traits inherent to Monte Carlo Yachts. Note the teak cap rail that helps to define the MCY 66’s sheer line.
The Portuguese bridge is one of many DNA traits inherent to Monte Carlo Yachts. Note the teak cap rail that helps to define the MCY 66’s sheer line. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

When I first saw the Monte Carlo Yachts 66, I thought back to my dad's 1956 Thunderbird. He spent the better part of a decade restoring his beloved two-seat convertible. The look of the '56 was unmistakable. There were its trademark short fins. A hardtop with porthole windows, and a soft top. Electric seats and power windows, both features almost unheard of in 1956. Whitewall tires. And chrome everywhere.

The look was so aligned with the Thunderbird brand, and so ingrained in the psyche of American motorheads, everyone knew her the minute they saw her cruising down the road, and the car always got a thumbs-up when people passed by.

The same sensation those drivers got seeing my dad’s car hit me when I saw the Monte Carlo Yachts 66 sitting quayside in Portopiccolo, Italy. ­Taking in her profile, it was ­immediately ­evident that Monte Carlo Yachts’ brand DNA is strong. And purposeful.

Light-tone fabrics and glass create a sense of openness.
Light-tone fabrics and glass create a sense of openness. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

For example, the yacht’s porthole windows amidships, flanking the full-beam master stateroom, are an MCY hallmark. My eyes moved from there to the ­carbon- fiber retractable hardtop shading almost the entire flybridge. There was the metallic hull paint. Finally, I gazed at the sweeping superstructure that flowed in the shape of a curious brow from the flybridge down toward the teak cockpit.

It’s because of these DNA traits, among others, that when MCY ­created its three 2019 models—a 70-footer has also launched, and a 76-footer is on its way—the builder chose not to make radical design changes but rather take an evolutionary approach.

Side decks are 15 inches wide.
Side decks are 15 inches wide. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

So what are the changes to the MCY 66 compared with her 65-foot ­predecessor? An extra foot of length, for sure. But there is more: The amidships portholes maintain the same shape as those on the 65, but they increased in size by about 20 percent, letting in more light and enhancing views. There is also about a foot of additional floor space in the new master. The builder repositioned the entrance to the stateroom and repositioned the shower to get those 12 inches.

Additionally, there are 45-inch-long rectangular windows with inset portholes flanking the forepeak VIP stateroom, which has an en suite head. (The MCY 65 just had portholes.) The rectangular windows are 13 inches at their widest point and 10 inches at their narrowest. They look black from the exterior and appear to lower the yacht’s profile. Headroom in the VIP is 6 feet, 5 inches. These attributes help create a sense of airiness.

A third stateroom is abaft the VIP to starboard with twin berths and access to a third head, which also serves as the day-head. There is a crew cabin for two all the way aft.

MCY reduced the thickness of the fiberglass superstructure versus the 65’s, increasing the glass that surrounds the 66’s salon. When combined with low-back furniture, the result is more light and a better connection between the interior and exterior spaces, not to mention the sense of openness on board.

The foredeck lounge can seat 10 people.
The foredeck lounge can seat 10 people. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

One measurable change from the MCY 65 is found on the MCY 66’s flybridge. Floor space here increased by about 40 square feet. What was once an L-shaped settee to port across from the helm is now U-shaped. There is also an L-shaped settee with a teak table abaft the helm bench seat. The retractable hardtop opens almost the entire flybridge to the sun.

One thing that remains the same is the yacht’s high freeboard and aggressive entry, reminiscent of the look found on sport-fishing yachts but not overdone. Her appearance says that she is willing to go head-to-head with the sea should it get into a snit.

Supporting the MCY 66’s take-on-the-salt aesthetic is a vacuum-infused fiberglass hull with foam coring. MCY says this build process optimizes the fiberglass-to-resin ratio and reduces overall weight. Internal aluminum supports further enhance strength. The yacht displaces 72,000 pounds (dry weight).

Fiberglass parts are post-cured in a three-stage process inside the builder’s 10,760-square-foot painting shed, which also functions as an oven. The room heats up to about 149 degrees Fahrenheit, and the stabilization process takes about 14 hours. The temperature then drops during the next 10-plus hours. This method reduces emissions while allowing for polymerization, which strengthens the fiberglass’s physical properties and should ensure long life for the hull paint.

Three staterooms and three heads is the standard layout on the Monte Carlo Yachts 66. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships.
Three staterooms and three heads is the standard layout on the Monte Carlo Yachts 66. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

MCY uses a modular build system to enhance construction efficiency. The hull, interior and superstructure are built in parallel. A one-piece interior module is completed in a jig, where workers can run wiring and glove-fit internal bulkheads, furnishings and the like. This setup allows staff to work both above and below the deck simultaneously, further expediting construction time. The process also helps keep build tolerances to within about 1 millimeter. Build time for an MCY 66, from the infusion to launch, is about four months.

The same level of organization applied to the MCY 66’s construction process is found in the yacht’s main-deck layout. Glass cockpit doors open to an ­unimpeded walkway on centerline from the ­cockpit to the helm forward. The galley is aft with Miele appliances, including a four-burner electric cooktop and ­­microwave/­convection oven. There’s also a full-height refrigerator.

When the sun gets high, drop in carbon-fiber poles and shade the foredeck lounge. In the evening, turn on the pop-up lights.
When the sun gets high, drop in carbon-fiber poles and shade the foredeck lounge. In the evening, turn on the pop-up lights. (Courtesy Monte Carlo Yachts/)

It’s one step up into the salon, which has an L-shaped settee to port and benches across. Light-tone furnishings, glossy white-and-gray marble, a gray oak sole, and lacquered Tanganyika wood work in concert, ­­creating a modern yet inviting space. The clean look could be defined as simple, but as designer Dan Lenard says, “Minimalism requires more work than opulence.”

The evolutionary design plan seems to work well for the Monte Carlo Yachts 66, and I’m sure that many yachtsmen will be giving her the thumbs-up as she passes by on the water.  Maybe even two.

Take the next step: montecarloyachts.it

New Year’s Yacht Charter in the Bahamas

The 125-foot Cheoy Lee <em>Nicole Evelyn</em> is available for New Year's in the Bahamas. The yacht accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms.
The 125-foot Cheoy Lee Nicole Evelyn is available for New Year's in the Bahamas. The yacht accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms. (Courtesy Ocean Independence/)

Ocean Independence says the 125-foot Cheoy Lee Nicole Evelyn is open for a New Year's booking of at least one week in the Bahamas.

Nicole Evelyn accommodates 10 guests in five staterooms. Four of the staterooms, including the main-deck master, are doubles. The final stateroom has twin berths, making the yacht an option for families chartering with children.

A hot tub is on the bridge deck in addition to the guest area on the sundeck, providing two open-air relaxation spots.

What's the lowest weekly base rate to charter Nicole Evelyn? It's $89,500. For the New Year's holiday, a premium may apply.

Take the next step: Contact a charter broker at oceanindependence.com

Lexus Launches 65-Foot Yacht

The LY 650 can reach a reported top hop of 33 knots and cruises at 217 knots for 321 nautical miles on a pair of optional Volvo Penta IPS 1350 diesels.
The LY 650 can reach a reported top hop of 33 knots and cruises at 217 knots for 321 nautical miles on a pair of optional Volvo Penta IPS 1350 diesels. (Courtesy Lexus/)

The luxury Japanese-car company enters the marine marketplace with the debut of its LY 650 sport yacht.

Lexus partnered with Italian yacht-design studio Nuvolari Lenard for the 65-footer's interiors and Wisconsin-based Marquis Yachts for its construction. The LY 650 recently made its debut in Boca Raton, Florida. The Lexus Sport Yacht Concept was first introduced in January 2017.

“The LY 650 symbolizes the challenges taken by Lexus, which aspires to be a true luxury lifestyle brand, to venture beyond the automobile,” Toyota President Akio Toyoda said. “A collaborative team between Toyota and Marquis Yachts introduced the Toyota Production System to the boat manufacturing facility to improve productivity and quality.

“I am truly looking forward to seeing the advanced, high-quality LY 650 display its beauty on the oceans and around the globe. As a mobility company, we are pursuing new possibilities for mobility, even on the sea.”

Lexus' 65-foot yacht comes standard with twin Volvo Penta IPS 1050 diesels.
Lexus' 65-foot yacht comes standard with twin Volvo Penta IPS 1050 diesels. (Courtesy Lexus/)

The LY 650’s construction is a combination of carbon fiber-reinforced plastic and glass-fiber reinforced plastic, creating a relatively lightweight, yet strong structure. The bulkheads are constructed of plywood and cork sandwich construction to help with sound attenuation. Deck lamination also has a foam-cork core for the same reason.

This Lexus yacht comes with LY-Link, software accessible by a mobile device that can monitor the LY 650 and send notifications via text message. LY-Link also allows owners to manage simple functions like the yacht’s air conditioning and lights.

Other technologies on the LY 650 include three 17-inch Garmin touchscreen displays at each helm (there’s one on the main deck with dual captain’s seats forward and on the starboard side and one on the flybridge). Yachtsmen, who are also audiophiles, can add a Mark Levinson surround-sound system with subwoofers.

Separated by a three-panel sliding door, the salon is set up with sofas and a galley aft. A 49-inch TV with 5.1 surround sound in the salon is also a standard feature with the LY 650. There is a lower helm forward with two seats.

The LY 650's master stateroom is full-beam amidships.
The LY 650's master stateroom is full-beam amidships. (Courtesy Lexus/)

Three staterooms are belowdecks, each with en suite head. The master stateroom is full-beam amidships.

Standard power for the LY 650 is twin Volvo Penta IPS 1050 diesels, but upgrades include twin IPS 1200s or IPS 1350s. Fuel capacity is 1,060 gallons. Lexus says the LY 650 can reach a top hop of 33 knots and cruises at 27 knots for 321 nautical miles with the largest engine option.

Other notable optional features include a hydraulic swim platform, anti-roll stabilizer, teak decking, a hardtop, a cockpit wet bar with a grill and ice maker, underwater lighting and cockpit joystick control.

For more information, visit: lexusyachts.com

Baglietto’s 213-Foot Concept Yacht Evolves

Note the superyacht's extensive hull-side glass.
Note the superyacht's extensive hull-side glass. (Courtesy Baglietto/)

The Baglietto shipyard in Italy has announced an update to its 213-foot concept yacht that was conceived in partnership with designer Francesco Paszkowski.

Shown for the first time last year, the concept yacht has darkened windows, an upper-deck pool with a transparent sole, and a “winter garden” that connects the indoor and outdoor spaces.

This 213-footer is designed with a pool on the upper deck.
This 213-footer is designed with a pool on the upper deck. (Courtesy Baglietto/)

The floodable garage can house a 33-foot tender, and an after area with side doors can become a beach club, gymnasium or pool when the tender is launched. Nearby are a sauna, hammam and other spa spaces.

How many guests could stay aboard? The layout has overnight accommodations for 12.

Where to learn more: visit baglietto.com

Experience the Tiara Sport 43 LS

The third model in the Tiara Sport LS Series, the 43LS, combines the aesthetic of sport styling with the luxurious amenities and details synonymous with the Tiara Sport brand.

The Cost of Dream Yachts

"He gave it another go, but this time the engine went to pieces. There was no need to push the red stop button."
"He gave it another go, but this time the engine went to pieces. There was no need to push the red stop button." (Steve Haefele/)

As I studied the images from the other side of the planet, I thought of my last chat with my pal Bill. “It’s a milestone. There are important decisions to be made. I must go,” he insisted prior to embarking on a 24-hour flight to the shipyard responsible for his new build.

“It’s like attending a school play,” I joked. (I knew better.)

Milestone moments in yachting, like the one Bill was attending, do not mark feats of technical innovation or give honorable mentions for the fastest, longest or most expensive hulls. They are, instead, a series of celebratory moments during a yacht’s construction when the owner agrees to write a check. They’re typically spelled out in a contract and are anticipated much like the birth of a child. At least by the builder.

“I wanna see what I’m paying for, in person,” Bill said, arguing the other side.

I’ve attended such milestones as a designer, and I admit that I often went to collect a check. However, on occasion, I served an owner as a witness. Fiberglass hulls burped from tooling. Aluminum hulls rolled from their bellies to their bottoms. The delivery of engines. The mating of hulls and superstructures. I’ve seen it all—mostly all good; however, when things sour, standing between a payment and a yacht builder can be unpleasant.

In the 1980s, I was asked to observe the testing of a custom-built, 16-cylinder diesel in a seedy industrial area the owner did not wish to visit. My mission was to confirm that the engine produced the horsepower claimed. A dynamometer would offer proof, and a check would follow. The engine was bolted to the “dyno” (basically a large, hydraulic brake) and prepped for blastoff with fuel, water, air and exhaust plumbing.

Hiding in a control room behind a bulletproof-glass barrier, the builder pushed a green start button, and then nervously applied throttle and load. A clock-size gauge on the wall shot upward: 200 hp short. He gave it another go, but this time the engine went to pieces. There was no need to push the red stop button. The builder and I looked at the remains, and then at each other. It was an uncomfortable moment. I recall feeling sorry for him, but then again, I was suffering the onset of Stockholm syndrome.

I thought of the experience as I reviewed a shot of Bill’s hull swaddled in a cradle on the shop floor. The superstructure sat nearby.

“What do ya think, Coyle? Looks great, doesn’t she?” Bill gushed.

“Her sheer sweep is perfect and not a freckle. Wonderful,” I offered.

In truth, new construction shots are like baby pictures. I have yet to see one quite as perfect as the ones penned on Gerber baby-chow jars.

But, at Bill’s insistence, I considered the last image: the head compartment still on the shop floor. Bill was sitting on a box where the water closet would be plumbed, to offer scale.

“Ahhh…plenty of ventilation?” I quipped.

“Don’t BS me, Coyle. What do you really think?” he asked.

“OK,” I said. “In my opinion, the builder wants a check.”

Invictus Yacht Shows Scope at Cannes

Invictus Yacht's GT370 has a stern cabin that can accommodate two single berths or a combined one for couples, and a third berth can be placed in the forepeak.
Invictus Yacht's GT370 has a stern cabin that can accommodate two single berths or a combined one for couples, and a third berth can be placed in the forepeak. (Invictus Yachts/)

Invictus Yacht presented its full-model range from its X series and T series at this year’s Cannes Yachting Festival.

The CX270 and the GT280S, an outboard configuration of the GT280, made global debuts. Other yachts on display included the CX250, the GT320, the GT370, the FX200 and the FX240.

The CX270 was one of two Invictus yachts to make its global debut at Cannes. It has a reported top speed of 43 knots.
The CX270 was one of two Invictus yachts to make its global debut at Cannes. It has a reported top speed of 43 knots. (Courtesy Invictus Yacht/)

At 26 feet LOA, the CX270 was designed with ergonomics in mind. Its stowaway anchor allows for extra space on the main deck. The hull and superstructure is fiberglass construction. A teak swim platform is optional.

There is a foredeck sun bed measuring 6.5 feet by 7 feet. Belowdecks is a cabin that fits a 5-foot, 10-inch by 4-foot, 11-inch berth. Salon headroom is 5 feet 10 inches. Power is single or twin outboards up to a total of 400 horsepower. The builder says top speed with a single 350 hp Suzuki outboard is 43 knots.

Also making its global debut was the GT280S, enhancing the original GT280 with two outboard engines that total 500 hp. It has a reverse bow like its “big sisters” of the range, the GT320 and the GT370, which are both equipped with sterndrive motors.

The GT280S improves upon the original GT280 model with two outboard engines that total 500 hp.
The GT280S improves upon the original GT280 model with two outboard engines that total 500 hp. (Courtesy Invictus Yacht/)

The 320 has a centrally located, L-shaped dinette facing an outdoor galley equipped with a fridge, an ice maker and a grill. Invictus Yacht’s GT370 has a stern cabin accommodating two single berths or one larger berth for a couple. A third berth can be placed in the forepeak.

Invictus Yacht’s outboard range was rounded off by its FX240 and FX200 models. The 240 is available in cruising and fishing options. Some options include a hardtop in either fiberglass or fabric, a livewell to replace the stern seating and removing the sun bed for more fishing space.

The CX240 can reach a reported top-end speed of 36 knots with a single Honda 250CV outboard. Cruising speed is reportedly 22 knots.

For more information, visit: invictusyacht.com

Yacht Charter in Alaska

A yacht charter in Alaska is a breathtaking experience.
A yacht charter in Alaska is a breathtaking experience. (Unsplash/Darrin Henein/)

Chris fagan made his first trip to Alaska aboard the 130-foot Westport Serengeti in 2014. Back then, he was the mate; this summer, he's doing his fourth season on the yacht as captain.

The place never gets old.

“It’s the best nature and wildlife ­cruising ground that there is,” he says. “Just given the vastness of the wilderness and the abundance of gigantic wildlife, it’s a reminder of what the world is capable of. It doesn’t matter who goes with us, whether they’ve chartered all over the world or it’s their first time: Everyone leaves with their minds blown.”

The good news for charter clients, he says, is that even ­despite the grandeur to be explored, precious few yachts with ­professional crew make the run to Alaska each summer. A lot of times, ­Serengeti has had an anchorage all to herself.

The bad news for charter clients, Fagan says, is that given the small number of available yachts and the short season, primarily from June through August, the best boats tend to book up fast. As of early May, Serengeti already had nine charters scheduled for this summer.

“I would say a year out is when you start getting the first bookings, and it’s wise to book six months in advance,” he says, “especially if you want a prime date.”

Clients wanting to book any boat in Alaska, he says, should look not only for an experienced crew, but also for a boat that's outfitted for the area. Serengeti, for instance, has Isinglass on the main and top decks, allowing wide views without cold winds.

And it’s the views that count—especially given the realities of climate change.

“Of course, the glaciers are slowly receding, but they’re still there,” he says. “Who knows? A hundred years from now, some of them may be backed up farther than we can get to in a boat, but anybody who goes up now can experience that beauty.”

This 130-foot Westport, part of the Northrop & Johnson fleet, is among a handful of crewed charter yachts that visit Alaska every summer. The crew have figured out ­everything from onshore provisioners to ­onboard Wi-Fi. The yacht
is a 2002 build that was refitted in 2014 and was in the yard for annual maintenance as of early May. Tenders include a 34-foot Regulator that can be rigged for fishing, as well as an 18-foot Novurania for zipping in and out of ports from Juneau to Sitka. The lowest weekly base rate is $120,000 for 10 to 12 guests.
This 130-foot Westport, part of the Northrop & Johnson fleet, is among a handful of crewed charter yachts that visit Alaska every summer. The crew have figured out ­everything from onshore provisioners to ­onboard Wi-Fi. The yacht is a 2002 build that was refitted in 2014 and was in the yard for annual maintenance as of early May. Tenders include a 34-foot Regulator that can be rigged for fishing, as well as an 18-foot Novurania for zipping in and out of ports from Juneau to Sitka. The lowest weekly base rate is $120,000 for 10 to 12 guests. (Courtesy Northrop & Johnson/)Part of the Infinity Yacht Charters fleet, this 105-foot Broward also bases in Alaska each year, giving the crew advantages—compared with yachts visiting for just one season—when it comes to planning itineraries and experiences. She’s a 1982 build that, since 2012, has had more than $1.4 million in refit work. Most recently, in 2018, a new northern-lights generator was added. ­Accommodations are for six guests in three staterooms, and the weekly rate of $59,000 includes meals, fuel and some additional expenses that other yachts charge as add-ons.
Part of the Infinity Yacht Charters fleet, this 105-foot Broward also bases in Alaska each year, giving the crew advantages—compared with yachts visiting for just one season—when it comes to planning itineraries and experiences. She’s a 1982 build that, since 2012, has had more than $1.4 million in refit work. Most recently, in 2018, a new northern-lights generator was added. ­Accommodations are for six guests in three staterooms, and the weekly rate of $59,000 includes meals, fuel and some additional expenses that other yachts charge as add-ons. (Courtesy Infinity Yacht Charters/)

What to expect in Alaska

  • Charter Itineraries typically take place between Juneau, Alaska's capital, and Sitka, in the southeast part of the state that borders Canada.
  • The sounds of the glaciers as they calve, cracking off chunks and dropping them into the sea, is as loud as the roar of lions or a low-flying plane.
  • Whales, bears, bald eagles and other wildlife are all around, so have a camera ready, ideally with a long lens.
  • Try the candied salmon, which is eaten as a stick, kind of like beef jerky.

Nordhavn 100: The Global Angler

<em>Serenity</em> on the Pacific Northwest's sometimes fog-shrouded waters.
Serenity on the Pacific Northwest's sometimes fog-shrouded waters. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

When most yachtsmen think of sport-fishing yachts, they likely conjure up images of long waterlines, flared bow sections, skyscraper tuna towers and planing-friendly undercarriages. Expedition-grade trawlers do not come to mind.

And for good reason. Expedition vessels are built for itineraries measured in days or weeks, not in the number of hours it takes to zip out to the canyons. Most expedition yachts struggle to crack the 15-knot barrier, a speed deficiency that most anglers cannot abide.

With Serenity, a heavily customized Nordhavn 100, the longtime builder of world-class expedition yachts sought to break those stereotypes. Serenity's owner worked with the California-based builder to create an expedition-grade sport-fishing yacht that's as adept at wrangling pelagic species as she is at hosting elegant dinners.

Interior design work is by Destry Darr Designs.
Interior design work is by Destry Darr Designs. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

I first spied her proud silhouette dominating the western skyline of Seattle's Elliott Bay Marina last fall, but I didn't fully appreciate her capabilities until I stepped into her steering room with Capt. Zach Gallagher. There, on the bulkhead, hung 30-plus custom-made fishing rods, each slightly different than the next but each painted the exact same Alexseal "Stars and Stripes" blue—perfectly matching Serenity's custom-painted topsides—and handsomely engraved with the superyacht's moniker. Gallagher also showed off dozens of reels, including serious-looking hydraulic setups, gaffs and fishing tackle, all organized and stowed in custom-built cabinets.

“If you think this is cool, wait until you see the fishing cockpit,” he says with a knowing smile.

Serenity is a stretched version of Nordhavn's N96, which itself is based on the N86's hull, adding a 10-foot extension to the "California deck" (­Nordhavn ­parlance for the outdoor space abaft the salon). Serenity's owner evolved this long-range cruising design for his angling ambitions by requesting an additional, low-freeboard aft fishing deck and swim step. Additionally, the owner worked with Destry Darr Designs to create five en suite staterooms and an enlarged galley with seating for four guests around an island.

<em>Serenity's</em> salon has seating for 10 guests and a drop-down screen for entertainment and news.
Serenity's salon has seating for 10 guests and a drop-down screen for entertainment and news. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

“The owner wants to introduce his family to a full international cultural experience,” Gallagher says as we walk from the galley to the salon, which has a table with seating for 10 and a drop-down screen. The table’s after end leads to a carpeted seating area that spills out onto the California deck.

Climbing the spiral ladder and stepping into the pilothouse, I see a helm with a marble dash, two white leather Stidd seats, four Furuno touchscreens, and a combination of Furuno, Simrad, FLIR and KVH equipment for long-range navigation and security, as well as satellite communications and entertainment. Suffice it to say, this yacht can cruise far while staying in touch.

<em>Serenity</em> is a stretched version of Nordhavn's N96, which itself is based on the N86's hull but with a 10-foot extension to the
Serenity is a stretched version of Nordhavn's N96, which itself is based on the N86's hull but with a 10-foot extension to the "California deck." (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Serenity's propulsion comes from twin 600 hp Caterpillar C18 Acert engines sitting atop vibration-absorbing mounts and spinning dual 48-inch propellers. DC power comes from dual Caterpillar C4.4 generators. An ABT-Trac stabilization system should enhance ride quality, while a pair of 50 hp bow and stern thrusters are installed for docking maneuvers.

Serenity is also equipped with four fuel tanks collectively holding 7,000 gallons of diesel, plus a 500-gallon centerline tank that serves as her day-use dromedary, and 100 gallons of gasoline for her tender. All told, Serenity has a 3,000-nautical-mile ­cruising range at 10 knots. She also carries a U.S. Coast Guard-­approved TidalWave HMX waste-management system, allowing her crew to discharge safely and legally, further facilitating the owner's off-the-grid ambitions.

"The N96s carry 900 gallons of fresh water, but we have 1,000 gallons," Gallagher says, adding that Serenity's two Dometic Sea Xchange watermakers each generate 1,800 gallons of potable water every 24 hours. "We have no daily water ration. We just carry extra filters."

The yacht carries an enlarged galley with seating for four guests around a center island.
The yacht carries an enlarged galley with seating for four guests around a center island. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Serenity also carries a quiver of toys, including eight sets of dive gear, a dive-tank air compressor and an 18-foot aluminum-bottom RIB that's hoisted via a Nautical Structures crane rated to 3,500 pounds. Additionally, Serenity sails with four surfboards, four stand-up paddleboards and two Jet Skis.

Gallagher guides me through Serenity's master stateroom, just abaft the bridge, noting the custom Miele coffee maker and the room's wraparound views. Stepping onto the owner's deck, Gallagher lights the yacht's fire pit, which is protected by a glass shroud and flanked by two deck chairs. I notice a box fitted to the starboard quarter rail and walk over to inspect a set of rudder, throttle and thruster controls.

“It was the owner’s idea,” Gallagher says. “All of [these] controls are mounted backwards because you’re facing aft when you’re using them.”

The flybridge has a table with a leaf and seating for 10, plus a Wolf gas grill, a Miele grill, a sink, fresh water, refrigerators and ice makers.
The flybridge has a table with a leaf and seating for 10, plus a Wolf gas grill, a Miele grill, a sink, fresh water, refrigerators and ice makers. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Next, he leads me to the flybridge, which has a second helm and a table with a leaf and seating for 10. “We’ve got a Wolf gas grill, a Miele teppanyaki grill, a sink, fresh water, refrigerators and ice makers here,” Gallagher says. “We can cook the whole meal up here.”

Abaft the flybridge’s protective coachroof sits a Jacuzzi with a custom awning and cushions. I glance over the rail at the water below, guesstimating the drop to be a solid 20 feet. Gallagher reads my mind. “The owner’s kids and I jumped from up here when we were down in the Sea of Cortez on the boat’s shakedown cruise,” he says, with a been-there-done-that smile. “They’re up for anything.”

The fishing deck is our final stop, and I can tell that Gallagher is keen to show off his boss’s brainchild.

“The owner is an experienced boater and is really drawn to fishing,” Gallagher says as we admire the side deck’s 30-foot teak runs. “Take an avid fisherman and multiply by 10, and that’s the boss man.”

The owner worked with Destry Darr Designs to create an accommodations plan with five en suite staterooms.
The owner worked with Destry Darr Designs to create an accommodations plan with five en suite staterooms. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

This much becomes obvious as we step onto the open fishing deck. Gallagher points out the 10 inset fishing-rod holders mounted around the teak rail, as well as the receptacle that accommodates the yacht’s Bluewater Large Marlin fighting chair.

“The chair’s got a three-axis mount and a 360-degree swivel, an offset swivel, and 11 rod holders,” he says. “We have handheld and hanging scales for weighing fish, and we’re hoping to catch one that’s big enough to need to hang from the crane.”

The fishing deck also has portable livewells, along with tackle boxes and floodlights for nighttime work. Gallagher says landed fish quickly graduate from the rod to the kill box to the fillet table to the vacuum sealer to the custom cockpit freezer. Once frozen, the fillets are transferred to one of Serenity's two deep freezers.

“I try to take all of the family’s interests into account when planning itineraries,” Gallagher says, adding that nonfishing activities have included paddling around icebergs, spotting grizzly bears and whales, and visiting mountain hot springs. “If it’s a guys’ fishing trip, the boat will be set up ­differently than if it’s a family cruise.”

<em>Serenity's</em> fishing deck has portable livewells, along with tackle boxes and and floodlights for nighttime work. After they're landed, fish graduate to the vacuum sealer and then, once frozen and filleted, to one of the yacht's two deep freezers.
Serenity's fishing deck has portable livewells, along with tackle boxes and and floodlights for nighttime work. After they're landed, fish graduate to the vacuum sealer and then, once frozen and filleted, to one of the yacht's two deep freezers. (Courtesy Nordhavn/)

Serenity's owner took delivery in Dana Point, California, in June 2018, following a three-year build. He immediately started voyaging. There was a shakedown cruise to the Sea of Cortez that was followed by a cruise to Canada's Desolation Sound and then a more ambitious third trip that took the boat from Campbell River, British Columbia, to Alaska's Glacier Bay as well as Admiralty, Baranof and Chichagof islands before ending in Juneau.

These passages have been 10 to 14 days in length, but Gallagher says the boat is spec'd for world cruising. "Serenity can carry 13 ­people on board for 11 days without taking on provisions," he says.

Granted, that's not running at 30 knots, but Serenity—as her name suggests—offers the ability to cruise, fish and ­explore in style and comfort, sans the usual durational and ­latitudinal limitations. Most important, she's equipped to ­cater to her owner's love of hunting pelagic species and enjoying quiet, far-removed anchorages.

“The owner wanted to go anywhere and fish the whole time,” Gallagher says. “When he’s aboard, we spend zero time at the dock.”

Amen.

Take the next step: nordhavn.com

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